Jump to content

262Online Users

  •  
Photo
- - - - -

Restaurant HACCP plans


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Cathy

Cathy

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 238 posts
  • 24 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Louisiana

Posted 18 July 2008 - 02:54 PM

Can anyone direct me to sample HACCP plans for restaurants? Thanks in advance!


  • 0
Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

#2 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,785 posts
  • 1393 thanks
104
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 18 July 2008 - 03:35 PM

Dear Cathy,

My guess is you know the USFDA material on retail HACCP already -

http://www.cfsan.fda...m/haccpoth.html

Probably similar comment regarding this "famous" website with a rather strange name -

http://www.hi-tm.com/

Also this thread which I briefly started but haven't yet expanded -

http://www.ifsqn.com...showtopic=10034

A more specific answer may depend on the type of restaurant ??

There are several catering-type people on this forum who can probably offer more personally knowledgeable suggestions, hopefully shortly.

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

#3 Cathy

Cathy

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 238 posts
  • 24 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Louisiana

Posted 18 July 2008 - 03:55 PM

Thanks Charles. Ah yes - the famous Peter Snyder.... I liked the 3rd link best. I've not had an opportunity to write a plan for a restaurant before, and now I need to learn. The regulatory environment is so different from the FSIS production plants I'm used to - and that impacts the plan a bit.


  • 0
Cathy Crawford, HACCP Consulting Group
http://haccpcg.com/

#4 Angus

Angus

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 24 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 19 July 2008 - 02:24 AM

Cathy,

This link maybe useful -> http://www.health.vi...s/templates.htm

Toni


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:

#5 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,785 posts
  • 1393 thanks
104
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 19 July 2008 - 09:06 AM

Dear Toni,

Many thanks for this link. Fascinating resource containing a wealth of recommendations / procedures etc. I guess it has similar objectives to the SFBB project in UK. I noticed that use of the term HACCP is not frequent.

To produce a generalised document such as the offered Food Safety Template is surely a very demanding project. I only had a quick look so I may hv misunderstood however I did find some of the “technical” statements rather questionable.

Eg -

(1)

*HIGH RISK FOOD INCLUDES meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, and smallgoods,
and foods which contain these foods, for example: quiches, sandwiches and prepared salads.
Other foods become high risk food when they are cooked, like rice and pasta.

I think I understand their intention but I don’t think HACCP would totally agree the above, eg if one is considering raw foods like seafood designated as to be cooked by the consumer. I also couldn’t see any classification for items considered to be low or medium risk.

In contrast I noticed elsewhere -

Potentially Hazardous Foods including meats, dairy, poultry, fish, cooked rice, coleslaws
and prepared salad (and any product that includes these), both in raw or ready to eat
forms must be stored at the correct temperature.



(2)

Frozen deliveries need to be hard frozen.

I understand the estimation problem but I don’t think HACCP would accept this.

(3)

• Check that the food is thoroughly cooked or the centre of the cooked food has
reached 75°C, using a thermometer. When cooking solid pieces (cutlets, steaks and
roasts) of red meat and oily fish, the internal temperature does not need to reach
75°C, but can be cooked to preference.


I didn’t understand the meaning of the second sentence in the context of food safety.

(4)

The ‘Two hour/four hour’ Rule:
If any ready-to-eat high risk food has been at a temperature of between 5°C and 60°C:
• For a total time of less than 2 hours, it must be refrigerated or used immediately.
• For a total of longer than 2 hours but less than 4 hours, it must be used immediately.
or
• For a total of 4 hours or longer, it must be thrown out.


Any idea of the microbiological basis for this rule, am not in the retail area and hadn’t seen it before.?

Despite my (few) reservations as above (open to comment of course :smile: ), this is undoubtedly an extremely useful source of (multilingual) information and procedures. I also noted the generous collection of dwl SOP monitoring forms (more like HACCP style) plus the external food catering event checklists.

Rgds / Charles.C

PS @ Cathy, :oops:, apologies for slightly hijacking yr thread, my curiosity got the better of me
  • 0

#6 Angus

Angus

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 24 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Earth
    Earth

Posted 22 July 2008 - 03:40 AM

Charles.C,

Thx for your comments and queries.

(1) I didn't quite follow this point, could you please expand on it.

(2) This checking if something is still frozen solid I believe has its roots in the Codex CAC/RCP - 8 "Recommended International Code of Practice for the Handling of Quick Frozen Foods" "5.2 Stepwise approach to temp control." It basically says to 1) visually inspect to verify the condition of the foods (eg for signs of damage, abuse, defrosting). 2) Examination of air temp monitoring records - if no irregularities no further action needs to be taken. There are steps 3) & 4) if there are irregularities.
So re the template in my original post it does look like that the visual inspection on its own does not go far enough.

(3) Micro contamination occurs on the surface or exposed parts of meat. So the process of mincing can introduce bacteria into the centre of a meat product. Therefore it needs to be cooked thoroughly. On the other hand a solid piece of meat will not be contaminated internally so can be cooked as desired.

(4) The 2hour/4hour rule is in the ANZFA Guidelines 3.2.2. http://www.foodstand...ralia2nd519.cfm I have requested the scientific data and will post it when received.

Hope this makes sense,

Thx
Toni


  • 0

#7 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,785 posts
  • 1393 thanks
104
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 22 July 2008 - 10:11 PM

Dear Toni,

Very good of you to respond and many thks for yr link to a huge and brillliant document. Was a bit puzzled that seemingly no revisions since 2001 (?) but must hv been the result of an enormous amount of highly expert input. Very impressive. There are a few things that maybe BRC wouldn’t like, hair-pins for example and jewelry options but such is life.
Re yr comments,
(1) I had assumed that the Victoria guide was a “simplified’ version of the full national standards similar to SFBB in UK being designed to offer a route to enable “small businesses” to comply with the current EU food requirements. IMO it is not that easy to simplify HACCP and “borrowing” terms like High Risk requires some care. The link above discusses this topic much more satisfactorily IMO, eg on pgs 44-48, but it’s all about space I guess.
(2) I did notice that elsewhere in Victoria document, frozen was interpreted as below -15degC (also below 0degC in one place, typo presumably). I hv also seen it interpreted as below -12degC in some UK documents and by inspectors controlling loading of frozen cargo. Both validations unknown to me.
(3) OK. I should hv spotted that this related to the (well-done vs otherwise) scenario for steak lovers. The phrasing is a bit casual for a semi-scientific document. There is an absolute encyclopedia on Google over this topic, > 90 pct supporting the “no-risk” camp and a few resisters, one notable seemed to be the USFDA (and US restaurants having a “eating rare steak here is at yr own risk” declaration .) I also noticed the official NZFA website has a “in general” added in to their safe steak procedure. Maybe New Zealanders are more cautious than Australians.
(4) Actually the appendix of yr above linked document has a ref. on this, apparently half to US Food Code 1999 and half to a UK guidance of similar date. I tried to trace them back but gave up. Snyder (hi-tm website) also discusses the US 4hr bit but the text is rather confusing (to me anyway).

Rgds / Charles.C (and apologies once more to Cathy :smile: )


  • 0

#8 taurai

taurai

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 1 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Zimbabwe
    Zimbabwe

Posted 06 March 2009 - 11:04 AM

hi

thanks a lot for the supplied website. i am into food safety consultancy and i have had expirience with manufacturing concerns and the the application for the hospitality sector is a different ball game all together. i am starting on a couple of projects with a number of hotels and the information acquired will definately get in in good stead.

thanx a lot guys

taurai


  • 0

#9 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,785 posts
  • 1393 thanks
104
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 06 March 2009 - 12:52 PM

Dear taurai,

You're welcome and also welcome to the forum ! :welcome:


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users