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How to handle rejected dairy products?


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#1 Piyush0680

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:40 AM

Gents,

I want to draft a procedure on how to handle the rejected dairy products for my company? Right now, we are providing the rejected packs to Government authority for proper dumping but last month we found some rejected product in the market. We are thinking for some ways to tighten the procedure and make sure that no rejected products can be used.

Do anyone have the best practice procedure or guideline for handling or dumping of rejected food products?

Regards,

Piyush


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#2 Suzuki

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Posted 19 October 2008 - 02:16 PM

Re-entry of NC product into trade undoubtedly has tremendous adverse impact on public health including product branding. Someone in your government department had been very naughty.

Before loosing control of the NC product disposal to "responsible party" for subsequent disposal, the procedure(s) may involve destroying the primary packaging identity and or prior to disposal - partially destroy the NC product values by crushing/dyeing/etc . IMO, visual sighting of actual disposal of the NC product as evidence of disposal should put the issue to rest. Its a highly potential scenario for any company and I hope this has helped.


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#3 a_andhika

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Posted 20 October 2008 - 11:07 AM

Dear Piyush,

In our place, our procedures to handle the rejected products/stocks are:

1. QC/QA issuing a report which verify the products/stocks are rejected. The analysis result should be attached.
2. Distribute the Report to relevant Department, in our case: Warehouse, PPIC, and Production. But sometimes we also distribute it into Purchasing and R&D.
3. The Warehouse then conducting a Monthly Disposal Report which based on QC Report. It must be signed by related Dept. Head (including accounting), the GM, and the Director.
4. Warehouse then scheduling the disposal time.
5. At the D-Day, the representative from: QC, Warehouse, and Accounting MUST be witnessing the disposal activities. They have to ensure the items and the quantities are the same as attached in Monthly Disposal Report. And they MUST ensure, that all of the items were disposed properly (burned, soaked, etc.), so it wont be able to used again. Plus, they have to documenting (took a picture) all of items and disposal activities.

You may pointing external party to do the disposal stuffs, but the important thing is you have to present and witnessing the whole disposal activities, and document it. As someone always said: to make sure it goes right, you have to do it by your own...


Regards,


Arya


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#4 Ayayay

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Posted 20 October 2008 - 06:38 PM

Hi All,

European comunity has several Regulations ( http://eur-lex.europ...N:PDF)regarding animal by-products not intended for human consumption.I think they will be very useful for you even if you are not in Europe. http://eur-lex.europ...013:0017:EN:PDF
This lin will give you some ideas regarding marking and transporting milk products. There are several ways to do it:
1. You can mark the packaging one by one that the products are not intended for human consumption.
2. The other way is to empty the packages in a bulk container, which is intened only for rejected products and transport and dispose them in a proper way.
And of course very important is to keep Arya's procedure to be sure that the whole rejected quantity moves from market back to you and to be disposed properly afterwards.


Regards: Ayayay


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#5 GMO

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Posted 25 October 2008 - 04:34 PM

Defacing the packs is definitely worth considering. Just dumping some dye on etc might be enough.


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#6 Piyush0680

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Posted 26 October 2008 - 12:35 PM

Thanks all for all your input related to handling of rejected products. I am believe the same that defacing the packs is the best method to make sure that the products are not re-used and disposed effectively.

Do anyone have or developed a procedure on handling of rejected products?

Cheers,

Piyush Mishra


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 05:37 AM

Dear Piyush,

Presumably, the precise sensitivity may be somewhat related to the reason for rejection ? And the quantity ?

It is not quite clear to me if you are confident that no rejected product had already entered the market or not ? Traceability ?

If not, Arya's / Suzuki's visual procedure seemed quite reasonable to me. You should hopefully be able to trust yr own representative?

The concept of chemical defacing seems rather environmentally questionable.

Rgds / Charles.C


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#8 Piyush0680

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Posted 27 October 2008 - 07:53 AM

Charles,

U r right, the traceability and its disposal is quite weak in our quality management system and that's where I am focusing currently. Defacing could lead to some environmental concerns but then what other procedures do we have for cent percent of disposal of rejected products.

That's why, I was looking for a best practice or some procedure guidance.

Regards,

Piyush


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#9 cazyncymru

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Posted 28 January 2009 - 07:53 PM

Gents,

I want to draft a procedure on how to handle the rejected dairy products for my company? Right now, we are providing the rejected packs to Government authority for proper dumping but last month we found some rejected product in the market. We are thinking for some ways to tighten the procedure and make sure that no rejected products can be used.

Do anyone have the best practice procedure or guideline for handling or dumping of rejected food products?

Regards,

Piyush


In the UK we have to abide by the Animal By-Products legislation. This means that we , as a dairy that produces waste, has to be registered with both DEFRA and the EHO as a handler of animal waste . the waste that is suitable for animal feed has to go with a "category note" as set out in legislation, to a registered farm. the category note, a copy of which we retain, must say that it is " not fit for human consumption"

Waste that is not fit for animal consumption must be destroyed by an approved registered disposal company, and a category note stating "not fit for animal consumption" must accompany the load.

Milk that has been contaminated by, say, antibiotics, must be destroyed by rendering and a category note, with "for disposal only"

hope this helps

c x
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