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#26 Esther

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 06:30 PM

Guidance to the use of the ISO 22000 standard indicates that Top Management should ensure that the org. establishes and maintain procedures to identify potential for and respond to potential accidents, emergency situations and incidents.

The Org. is also expected to review and / or revise where necessary its prepareness and response procedures after the occurence of an actual accident or emergency situation.

How far should we cover and in the case of BRC-Food where we address emergency incidents supported perhaps by contamination incident procedures, ISO 22000 appears to be very implicative particularly on potential situations such as bio-terrorism issues.

What are the programs, procedures and response models that we need to put in place under this requirement.

As ISO 22000 is expected to be formally published soon, it is inevitable that we need to take view of this impending standard some what seriously and hold a good grip of it to keep. This is the only forum that I am aware of that has so far make a decent effort in keeping the public in touch with this standard.

Regards
Charles Chew


Hello Charles
It has been very interesting to read the discussion between you and Simon. I was looking forward to giving my opinion when I reach the end but...jamesgibb spoke first.

I agree with him.
How is it possible to control something that is unknow ? Example: Encefalopatia Spongiform Bovine, nobody will never imagine this could happen by the use of animal protein on animal feed products. Legislation, control measures....have come behing scientific studies which, I think, will occur with many others hazards.

On the other hand, other situations you talked about such as fire, huracanes..... I think those should be covered by the Health and Safety system on place.

According to jamesgibb`s opinion, It seems that " emergency and preparedness procedures " referred to what you do in case of and food poisoning or any incident regarding food safety ( an error on the label ): investigation, recall product procedure, how serious the problem is ( for example if the people at risk is elderly people, children.. ).............to sum up, all the work that the official authorities do in these cases.

But..all those interestings things you has pointed out on one of the latest responses may have sense. What the result would be if you analysed them on the table : PROBABILITY and SEVERITY ( attention: severity for human health not for business )

Regards
Esther
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#27 Charles Chew

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:02 AM

Hi Esther,

I am glad you have enjoyed the discussion on this subject.

Most of the situations that are regarded as "food alerts" (as you have mentioned) are already under the watchdog of the respective authorities. Unknown situations are reall what they mean - "unknown"

But if we know that there is a likelihood on any of these potential events happening, then what ISO 22000 is suggesting is - why are we not prepared for a potential incident however remote it is versus some thing that is impossible to occur like a "tsunami occuring in inland Berlin, Germany?

As a matter of fact, I have already put up a "pandemic bird flu plan" as an emergency and response program as it is a highly potential and probable event. This satisfied the requirements under ISO 22K for "Emergency Preparedness and Response", "System Upgrade", "External & Internal Communications" and "Customer's Needs" etc....dont' you think so :beer: For the QMS aspect of ISO 9K in ISO 22K- there should in fact view business continuity program as a priority issue.

ISO 22000 is one hell of a FSMS :clap:


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Cheers,
Charles Chew
www.naturalmajor.com

#28 Esther

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 04:26 PM

Hi Esther,

I am glad you have enjoyed the discussion on this subject.

Most of the situations that are regarded as "food alerts" (as you have mentioned) are already under the watchdog of the respective authorities. Unknown situations are reall what they mean - "unknown"

But if we know that there is a likelihood on any of these potential events happening, then what ISO 22000 is suggesting is - why are we not prepared for a potential incident however remote it is versus some thing that is impossible to occur like a "tsunami occuring in inland Berlin, Germany?

As a matter of fact, I have already put up a "pandemic bird flu plan" as an emergency and response program as it is a highly potential and probable event. This satisfied the requirements under ISO 22K for "Emergency Preparedness and Response", "System Upgrade", "External & Internal Communications" and "Customer's Needs" etc....dont' you think so :beer: For the QMS aspect of ISO 9K in ISO 22K- there should in fact view business continuity program as a priority issue.

ISO 22000 is one hell of a FSMS :clap:


Hello Charles

Very good! Pandemic bird flu plan ! We all know about the severity but regarding probability.....let`s wait what happen. The worry on scientifics` mind is about the tranfer of the virus from person to person, that is the way it will become a pandemic situaction ( and not from food as the main via )
I am interesting about the opinion of the auditor at the moment of the certification audit regarding this plan.
I will be waiting for your comment.

Regards
Esther
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#29 Charles Chew

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 05:14 PM

Esther,

A potential tsunami event or a bird flu outbreak are similar in many ways as they do not directly or necessarily create food risks from food to humans but what ISO 22K wants you to do is to engage a preparation response plan in case these events do occur and ultimately has direct or indirect bearings on the facilities that produce foods for humans.

FYI, the auditor took a copy of the plan and had it submitted together with his audit report for UKAS review so I think it must be a good thing.


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Cheers,
Charles Chew
www.naturalmajor.com

#30 Simon

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Posted 25 January 2006 - 09:24 PM

Esther,
FYI, the auditor took a copy of the plan and had it submitted together with his audit report for UKAS review so I think it must be a good thing.


:king: Charles you have just been crowned ISO 22000:2005 guru. :clap:
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Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
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#31 bibi

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 04:03 PM

:king: Charles you have just been crowned ISO 22000:2005 guru. :clap:

:thumbup: I add my voice to Simon :clap:
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#32 Franco

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 07:56 AM

You know what I mean


Emergency handbook for food managers could be an example ?
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An ancient Chinese proverb teaches that the person who waits for a roast duck to fly into their mouth must wait a very long time.

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#33 Phillip Huff

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 05:40 AM

We are in the process now of developing our ISO 22000 system. For this section we have broken down the topic into three sections:

(1) Emerg. Resp. requiring plant evacuation
(2) Emerg. Resp. requiring product recall
(3) Business Continuity

The first 2 are the easier to cover.

Point 1 covers off fire, flood, extreme snow storms (a real problem where I am from), extreme cold (ie. people can't go outside to run the equipment), accidental spills, etc. We have evacuation and cleanup procedures in place to cover these off.

Point 2 covers our HACCP product recall/withdrawal for all recalls including finished product and raw materials/packaging.

Point 3 is the more difficult. Our procedures (in development) need to cover off employee pandamic (flu), strikes, loss of ingredient supply (a big problem if you only have one supplier of a major ingredient), or the loss of a key employee. In this case we will have to list all of the key employees who will have to have their duties covered off in the 'hit by the bus' scenario. We are also actively locating duplicate suppliers of all of our ingredients (and getting QA to approve them all).

The most important point that any auditor will ask is: "Have you tested your procedures?" If you haven't tested them, then they are basically useless because they may not work.


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#34 joyfranks

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 11:58 AM

Hi All,

Ive been away a while at the CIES conferance and GFSI technical meetings as well as developing an ISO 22000 training course for my visit to Kazakstan !!. ISO 22000 is truly going global.

:thumbup:

Anyway back to this subject. I dont know if you are aware that British Standards have released BS25999 which is a continuity management code of practice. This has been released and the part 2 - specification is due to be released this year. It fits very well with ISO 22000 and once the specification comes out can also be 3rd party audited. If you want any more information let me know :)

Joy


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Joy Elizabeth Franks

#35 Simon

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 08:50 AM

Anyway back to this subject. I dont know if you are aware that British Standards have released BS25999 which is a continuity management code of practice. This has been released and the part 2 - specification is due to be released this year. It fits very well with ISO 22000 and once the specification comes out can also be 3rd party audited. If you want any more information let me know :)

Hi Joy, do you have a contents list and any other information for BS 25999 that you could post.

Would something like the above be useful to you members?

Regards,
Simon
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#36 cazyncymru

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Posted 05 February 2007 - 07:53 PM

We are in the process now of developing our ISO 22000 system. For this section we have broken down the topic into three sections:

(1) Emerg. Resp. requiring plant evacuation
(2) Emerg. Resp. requiring product recall
(3) Business Continuity

The first 2 are the easier to cover.

Point 1 covers off fire, flood, extreme snow storms (a real problem where I am from), extreme cold (ie. people can't go outside to run the equipment), accidental spills, etc. We have evacuation and cleanup procedures in place to cover these off.

Point 2 covers our HACCP product recall/withdrawal for all recalls including finished product and raw materials/packaging.

Point 3 is the more difficult. Our procedures (in development) need to cover off employee pandamic (flu), strikes, loss of ingredient supply (a big problem if you only have one supplier of a major ingredient), or the loss of a key employee. In this case we will have to list all of the key employees who will have to have their duties covered off in the 'hit by the bus' scenario. We are also actively locating duplicate suppliers of all of our ingredients (and getting QA to approve them all).

The most important point that any auditor will ask is: "Have you tested your procedures?" If you haven't tested them, then they are basically useless because they may not work.



Hi Phil

You might like to add emergency response due to an external factor such as bird flu or foot and mouth, where you would have to introduce stricter bio security measures.

caz x
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#37 Phillip Huff

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 03:24 AM

We have included all related business interuptions into our 3rd category - Business Continuity. Our primary concern is pandemic flus and other illnesses that would affect our labour however others such as bird flu are also on the list.

Thanks,
Phil :smile:


Edited by Phillip Huff, 06 February 2007 - 03:26 AM.

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#38 tery

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 10:10 AM

Simon,
This plan appears to be more suited for ISO 9K. Emergencies are more towards "unknown hazards" that needed suitable responses within a desirable time frame.

Have a look at attachment on one of the responses under ISO 22K

Charles Chew

I could not download the attachment, please help?

 

Thank you


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