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#1 Jarve

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:08 AM

We have been looking at a product for a major brand but kept hitting a "high salt level" when our product was analysed. We copied exactly the recipe that we were given and using nutricalc we calculated that their declared salt level was lower than we would expect. After bouncing e-mails backwards and forwards we have now found out that they have been analysing chloride levels whereas we have been working off Sodium levels and sodium is being picked up not just in salt as an ingredient but also in baking powder which is giving us a higher "salt" content.

All food information seems to relate to sodium levels related to salt, but we are being told that the chloride level is being calculated into a "salt" level. Is this legally acceptable?


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#2 GMO

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 10:37 AM

I've never seen it and I would be suspicious. The point of going off sodium levels is that for a start the sodium and chloride ions will have little to do with each other if they're in solution and secondly it's sodium which is identified as having a deleterious health effect not the chloride.

There must surely be an accredited method which labs use? Have you tried talking to the lab doing your analysis to ask their opinion?


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#3 poppysnoss

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 11:11 AM

Indeed it is acceptable.

A standard method in many lab is BS 4401-6:1996, ISO 1841-1:1996. This is determination of chloride content (Volhard method) in meat and meat products, which salt can subsequently be calculated from.

What products are you having analysed?

Pops


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#4 Jarve

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 02:38 PM

Dumplings, going into ready meals in cans.


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#5 GMO

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 06:57 PM

It just seems crazy to me. Determination of salt in a recipe product by only considering the chloride element ignores the rest of the sodium in the meal. If it's common practice, I think it's misleading to the consumer, especially if they have been instructed to reduce their sodium intake for health reasons.

Heres a review document talking about the effects of sodium on health:
http://www.ific.org/...ws/sodiumir.cfm

With the chloride method, does that mean you could add other sodium salts, e.g. MSG but be able to claim on pack "low salt"?


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 26 May 2009 - 07:30 PM

Dear GMO,

I can assure you it is very common practice indeed although it obviously has specific chemical limitations. The simplicity, cost and (usually) accuracy are also attractive. :smile:

Typically people who supply samples requiring "salt" analysis are asked if they know of other interfering possibilities but the standard answer is "no idea, that's why I'm paying you to do it." :biggrin:

The other route via Na additionally has significant measurement problems IMEX, things like AA lamp stability and the like.

Nonetheless, in respect to yr valid fears, if someone asked specifically for a "sodium" measurement, it would not normally be done via chloride titration IMEX unless the sample was specifically known to have no interferences.

Perhaps it's easier to follow the FSA limits on number of tsp of added salt per day.

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 GMO

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Posted 27 May 2009 - 02:30 PM

I'll just make all the products containing only MSG and claim "salt free" then! :lol: Seriously, this is why I love this place, I learn so much new stuff. There's so many things that go on in the food industry (especially with claims) that I find dubious on a moral / scientific ground but I keep being proved wrong.

On an aside, with all the changes to 'clean dec' storecupboard ingredients from the major UK retailers obviously they would not be keen to use MSG as an ingredient but I remember when I was growing up buying ve-tsin from a Chinese supermarket and using it in cooking so MSG was in my storecupboard! Made mushrooms taste great btw! :biggrin:


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#8 Jarve

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Posted 01 June 2009 - 04:13 PM

I have been looking around for a day or two now on this matter but hitting the usual FSA "vagueness".

Does anyone have it clearly stated in black and white that chloride analysis is an acceptable method for salt determination in foods?

Thanks


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#9 AS NUR

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 12:57 AM

you can use titration(with AgNO3 as Titrant).. that procedure based on presipate formation when Chloride react with Ag.. Black sediment is the end point of that method.


Edited by AS NUR, 02 June 2009 - 12:57 AM.

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#10 Hongyun

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Posted 02 June 2009 - 05:11 AM

I have been looking around for a day or two now on this matter but hitting the usual FSA "vagueness".

Does anyone have it clearly stated in black and white that chloride analysis is an acceptable method for salt determination in foods?

Thanks


Sorry Jarve,

No help on the black and white. But I used to do similar titration for salt test, based on chloride content.

The whole idea of checking salt content, IMO, is to identify how "salty" the product is, not on the Sodium content.

Savory seasonings can sometime go over 10% and marinades, sometimes over 30% high.

The other stuffs from the link provided by GMO does contribute to Na content, but does not provide the "salty" taste. Neither are they commonly used in large quantities (e.g. Na Benzoate, Na bicarbonate, Na alginate, etc...) --> and these items will jerk up your "salt" content if you are checking for Na.

So, maybe you should ask your customer on what specific result are they looking for. If they want to know how salty is the product, a measument of Cl value is good enough. But if they want to know overall Na salt content, then another test might be required.

Hope this helps.

Edited by Hongyun, 02 June 2009 - 05:12 AM.

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#11 wijit

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Posted 18 July 2009 - 11:23 PM

Call me old fashioned, but I would always go down the titration using Siver nitrate and see what the salt content actually is method, my humble self!


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#12 Abdul Qudoos

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 12:21 PM

Determine the salt content in your product: Determining the salt content of foods

How is your final product?
- A piece of dough - sweetened and or filled, baked, cooked / deep fried and in liquid such as water or soup.


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