Jump to content

278Online Users

  •  
Photo
- - - - -

Is it OK to eat Sweet and Sour Chicken the next day?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 9,239 posts
  • 494 thanks
74
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Work, Sport, The Internet, Food, Sleeping and lot's of other things...

Posted 06 August 2009 - 09:10 AM

On Tuesday the cooker broke for the third time in 14 months for the same reason. :helpplease: Anyway if you’ve ever tried feeding a family without an oven or hob you quickly come to appreciate domestic cooking appliances; when they work. The service company can come to fix it next Monday. Sorry they can come and look at it next Monday and then they will go away for a week or so to get a part and then come back to fix it. I told them the part number for the switch from the previous paperwork, but either they didn’t believe me or they like wasting time. Anyway we will be without our beloved cooker for a couple of weeks.

Whenever I’m faced with a problem such as this I don’t get angry or panic I try to find new ways of not starving…

Last night on my home I called at the Chinese takeaway and this is the point of my post. I purchased two portions of fried rice a portion of chicken and black bean sauce and a portion of sweet and sour chicken. They chucked in a bag of prawn crackers for free. :smile: I got the kids jumbo sausage and chips form the chippy next door.

Anyway we ate everything except the portion of sweet and sour chicken and it was all very tasty.

Now I left the sweet and sour chicken on the kitchen worktop in its container with a lid on top and then put it into the refrigerator an hour or so later. It has remained there nicely chilled all night.

My question is will the sweet and sour chicken be OK to reheat and eat later today?

It was my first visit to this Chinese takeaway but it looked clean and the server seemed clean and tidy and the food itself was delicious.

I think this forum is making me paranoid - what do you think? :dunno:

Regards,
Simon


  • 0

Kind Regards,
Simon Timperley
The IFSQN Admin
 
Register Here + Upgrade Membership Helpful Info + Contact Us + Advertising + Store
 
Introductory video on the IFSQN Supply Food Safety Management System Implementation Packages we have available for the major GFSI Benchmarked schemes including FSSC 22000, SQF Code, BRC and IFS. Watch Video Now >>

 

This video shows how to download and access the FSMS package and provides an overview of the extensive documentation, records templates, training, checklists and project implementation tools. Watch Video Now >>
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.


#2 wombat

wombat

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 9 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 06 August 2009 - 03:58 PM

Definitely paranoid!

Eat it, you only die once!! Seriously, should be fine. I've got three day old curry for dinner tonight, and I'm on immunosuppresants! :doh:


  • 0

#3 MRios

MRios

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 157 posts
  • 10 thanks
1
Neutral

  • Guatemala
    Guatemala

Posted 06 August 2009 - 05:08 PM

In Guatemala (and Mexico, I´ve heard) we have a "Leftovers Day". All the leftovers from the week are eaten on that day. Beans are made in large quantities to last for a week, too. And we´re talking tropics here...
Like I saw in a movie: I laugh with all my mouth at eating day old Chinese takeout!!!
Which makes me think: whenever we have Chinese, since portions are so big, we always have the leftovers the next day. Except for terrible thirst (too much MSG), I haven´t seen anything strange happen.


  • 0

#4 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,906 posts
  • 372 thanks
47
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, scuba diving and skiing

Posted 06 August 2009 - 05:26 PM

Well Simon based on Food Hygiene Regulations 2006 then provided you followed the following rules you food should be fine:

Maximum time for hot food in danger zone (8 - 63°C) 2 hours

Store chilled less than 8 °C

When reheating heat to a minimum temperature of 63°C

I just hope it wasn't battered sweet and sour as it will be pretty soggy.

Regards,

Tony :rolleyes:


  • 0

#5 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,799 posts
  • 1395 thanks
105
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 06 August 2009 - 10:59 PM

Dear Simon,

Well, I regularly divide my occasional food deliveries (nutritious macs, pizzas et) into 2 for next 1-2 day eating but then i minimise the thickness of the balance where possible to boost the chilling speed (as suggested in an earlier thread :thumbup: . ) I always try to reheat in an oven though rather than microwave and I do hv a few qualms where salads are involved (only use name brands) and other more notorious items like shrimps. So far the only "disappointments" hv come from salads, particularly (I suspect) where constituents such as chopped cabbage are involved (large surface area and probably large initial load and maybe inadequate washing or xcontam. etc).
> 2day delay involves consideration of deep freeze !

The practical question is assessing the parameters as per Tony's post which demands a (presumably mental) evaluation of yr technique and yr refrigerator / oven / microwave whatever. Not to mention the sharing aspect. Perhaps a consensus vote is required in yr case?

Rgds / Charles.C

PS I don't think I would do this if i thought my refrigerator wasroutinely running at 8degC, I target 6max but look for <=5. I also target to reheat considerably more than 63degC (rule of thumb from chemistry titration is 60degC is typically just too hot to hold :smile: )

PPS in contrast, i tend to (often unintentionally) ignore the 2 hr theory but depending on the item again.

P3S of course, small restaurants are undoubtedly experts on this subject, particularly on slow days :smile:


  • 0

#6 Sirius

Sirius

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 17 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Australia
    Australia

Posted 07 August 2009 - 01:11 AM

If you followed the 2 hour/4 hour rule and make sure you reheat over 65C and you should be good.

Personally, I LOVE cold pizza. LOL


  • 0

#7 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,906 posts
  • 372 thanks
47
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, scuba diving and skiing

Posted 07 August 2009 - 03:48 AM

I also target to reheat considerably more than 63degC

:thumbup:

I agree Charles for example: temperature control measures in Scotland do differ significantly from those applying elsewhere in the UK in that food reheated must reach a temperature of 82°C.

Regards,

Tony :smile:
  • 0

#8 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 9,239 posts
  • 494 thanks
74
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Work, Sport, The Internet, Food, Sleeping and lot's of other things...

Posted 07 August 2009 - 10:14 AM

Thanks for the advice, but I had already eaten it long before I got any replies. :rolleyes:

The good news is I’m still alive and well. :thumbup: It was actually delicious as is often the case with next day reheated food – why? :dunno:

I think I complied with the rules and it was battered sweet and sour but not too soggy.

Maximum time for hot food in danger zone (8 - 63°C) 2 hours
Store chilled less than 8 °C
When reheating heat to a minimum temperature of 63°C
I just hope it wasn't battered sweet and sour as it will be pretty soggy.

I reheated in the microwave and the sauce was bubbling so I think I would have even satisfied the Scots.

Just for interest what bacteria could I have been exposed to? There was chicken in batter, some kind of sauce, peppers, onions, and I think some fruit like pineapple.

Regards,
Simon
  • 0

Kind Regards,
Simon Timperley
The IFSQN Admin
 
Register Here + Upgrade Membership Helpful Info + Contact Us + Advertising + Store
 
Introductory video on the IFSQN Supply Food Safety Management System Implementation Packages we have available for the major GFSI Benchmarked schemes including FSSC 22000, SQF Code, BRC and IFS. Watch Video Now >>

 

This video shows how to download and access the FSMS package and provides an overview of the extensive documentation, records templates, training, checklists and project implementation tools. Watch Video Now >>
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.


#9 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 6,799 posts
  • 1395 thanks
105
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 07 August 2009 - 01:54 PM

Dear Simon,

I was going to say everything bar marine species but then I noticed the prawn crackers so congratulations, full house. :smarty: (as against a running flush ;) )

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

#10 Tony-C

Tony-C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,906 posts
  • 372 thanks
47
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Koh Samui
  • Interests:My main interests are sports particularly football, scuba diving and skiing

Posted 09 August 2009 - 03:22 AM

Just for interest what bacteria could I have been exposed to?
Regards,
Simon


Hi Simon

Biggest risk would have been if you had some left over rice - Bacillus cereus toxin

Regards,

Tony
  • 0

#11 Simon

Simon

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Admin
  • 9,239 posts
  • 494 thanks
74
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Manchester
  • Interests:Life, Family, Work, Sport, The Internet, Food, Sleeping and lot's of other things...

Posted 13 August 2009 - 06:57 AM

Hi Simon

Biggest risk would have been if you had some left over rice - Bacillus cereus toxin

Regards,

Tony

Thanks Tony - no rice was left over, but in my mind I always knew rice could be quite hazardous. I rememeber a wedding once where rice was on the buffet and it had been out a long time and caused carnage amongst the guests.

Regards,
Simon
  • 0

Kind Regards,
Simon Timperley
The IFSQN Admin
 
Register Here + Upgrade Membership Helpful Info + Contact Us + Advertising + Store
 
Introductory video on the IFSQN Supply Food Safety Management System Implementation Packages we have available for the major GFSI Benchmarked schemes including FSSC 22000, SQF Code, BRC and IFS. Watch Video Now >>

 

This video shows how to download and access the FSMS package and provides an overview of the extensive documentation, records templates, training, checklists and project implementation tools. Watch Video Now >>
 
hand-pointing-down.gif

Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users