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What is the difference between Withdrawal & Recall?


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#1 jeniffer

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 04:19 AM

Dear All:

Can anobody tell me what is the diffrrence between withdrawal and recall?

Thanks in advance


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#2 Zeeshan

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 11:40 AM

Dear All:

Can anobody tell me what is the diffrrence between withdrawal and recall?

Thanks in advance



It depends on the standard(s) to which your system is compliant (ISO 22000, BRC, ....) and your own practices. However, Withdrawl and Recall are generally defined as:

1- Withdrawal is the process of retrieving the suspected product from the distributor end.

2- Recall is the process of of retrieving the suspected product from the consumer end.

But as I said, these definitions are not standard definitions, AFAIK. ISO 22000 considers both withdrawal and recall as interchangeable terms.

Regards:
M.Zeeshan.

Edited by Zeeshan, 02 July 2010 - 11:42 AM.

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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 02 July 2010 - 10:47 PM

Dear jeniffer,

A few more previously posted thoughts here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ndpost__p__6392

and here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__15864

Rgds / Charles.C

BTW Welcome to the forum! :welcome:


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 V.R. Reddy

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Posted 07 July 2010 - 07:43 AM

It depends on the standard(s) to which your system is compliant (ISO 22000, BRC, ....) and your own practices. However, Withdrawl and Recall are generally defined as:

1- Withdrawal is the process of retrieving the suspected product from the distributor end.

2- Recall is the process of of retrieving the suspected product from the consumer end.

But as I said, these definitions are not standard definitions, AFAIK. ISO 22000 considers both withdrawal and recall as interchangeable terms.

Regards:
M.Zeeshan.



Dear Zeeshan,

I was under the impression that the word "Recall" is used when there is food safety issue is involved where as "withdrawal” for other issues not related to food safety for example : differences in weight or colour etc.

Or I could be wrong.

Regards

V.R. Reddy
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#5 GMO

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 11:46 AM

Dear Zeeshan,

I was under the impression that the word "Recall" is used when there is food safety issue is involved where as "withdrawal” for other issues not related to food safety for example : differences in weight or colour etc.

Or I could be wrong.

Regards

V.R. Reddy



Well it often is recall = food safety because a food safety issue will require a recall from the consumer if the product has made it that far; however, if a food safety issue has not made it to the consumer and is still in the distribution chain, I would call that a withdrawal and likewise there have been quality, not food safety related recalls in the past, they are less common though. Likewise a withdrawal can happen without a full public recall even if the product has made it to the consumer but it depends upon the risks.

As with all of food safety, deciding on whether it should be a recall or withdrawal depends upon the old chestnut; risk assessment / likelihood matrix Posted Image

High risk of consumer illness (ie food safety issue) but 100% certain it's not made it to consumer yet? = withdrawal (but you have to be 100% certain that no product has made it through, it will depend upon the size of the issue and who is in control of the stock on whether you can be sure of that I would argue.)
High risk of consumer illness (ie food safety issue) and a chance it's made it to the consumer? = recall
Low risk of consumer illness (ie quality issue) but 100% certain it's not made it to consumer yet? = withdrawal
Low risk of consumer illness (ie quality issue) and a chance it's made it to the consumer? = dependent on what the risks are, amount and (to be honest) the ethos / culture in your company (sad but true!)

Remember folks in the EU, as soon as you think you might have a food safety issue which might be on sale to consumers, you should inform the competent authorities (who may help you make the above decision lol!) In the UK this will be your EHO.
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#6 Mária

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Posted 15 November 2010 - 06:23 AM

See please Directive 2001/95/ES. Mária


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#7 Charles Chew

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 03:32 AM

Confusing terms but have the same objectives with differing reasons. Why not just call it product recovery and state the reasons for doing so. I guess its just like traceability - are we referring to the "front" or 'back" but objective is the same (tracing / tracking) however the reason on doing so is different again. No need to loose sleep over this!


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Cheers,
Charles Chew
www.naturalmajor.com

#8 GMO

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Posted 29 November 2010 - 01:18 PM

Confusing terms but have the same objectives with differing reasons. Why not just call it product recovery and state the reasons for doing so. I guess its just like traceability - are we referring to the "front" or 'back" but objective is the same (tracing / tracking) however the reason on doing so is different again. No need to loose sleep over this!



Yes and no. It's political in the UK anyway. A withdrawal is bad news, a fine from the retailers etc but a recall is public news (ie even worse) and definitely talking to regulatory authorities. That's why the two terms have come into existance. It's basically "how much of a spanking am I going to get on this one?!" :whistle:
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#9 Marinaqa

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Posted 24 November 2016 - 12:07 PM

Good morning all.

 

if you read the article 19 of R178/2002, you will see how clear it is written:

"Responsibilities for food: food business operators 1. If a food business operator considers or has reason to believe that a food which it has imported, produced, processed, manufactured or distributed is not in compliance with the food safety requirements, it shall immediately initiate procedures to withdraw the food in question from the market where the food has left the immediate control of that initial food business operator and inform the competent authorities thereof. Where the product may have reached the consumer, the operator shall effectively and accurately inform the consumers of the reason for its withdrawal, and if necessary, recall from consumers products already supplied to them when other measures are not sufficient to achieve a high level of health protection."

 

withdrawal=the process of retrieving product from the distribuitor end

recall=the process of retrieving product from the consumer end.

 

Hope its clear and helps

 

Bye, 

Marina

 

 


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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 04:55 AM

Good morning all.

 

if you read the article 19 of R178/2002, you will see how clear it is written:

"Responsibilities for food: food business operators 1. If a food business operator considers or has reason to believe that a food which it has imported, produced, processed, manufactured or distributed is not in compliance with the food safety requirements, it shall immediately initiate procedures to withdraw the food in question from the market where the food has left the immediate control of that initial food business operator and inform the competent authorities thereof. Where the product may have reached the consumer, the operator shall effectively and accurately inform the consumers of the reason for its withdrawal, and if necessary, recall from consumers products already supplied to them when other measures are not sufficient to achieve a high level of health protection."

 

withdrawal=the process of retrieving product from the distribuitor end

recall=the process of retrieving product from the consumer end.

 

Hope its clear and helps

 

Bye, 

Marina

Hi Marina,

 

Welcome to the Forum ! :welcome:

 

Thks for yr quote which I guess is taken from this -

 

Attached File  CELEX_32002R0178_EN_TXT.pdf   222.87KB   19 downloads

 

But do note that the Regulation is actually  (EC) No 178/2002

 

The reality is that the interpretation of such terminologies varies with location, etc. And possibly even within the EC (Pre/Post-Brexit) due Sovereign Rights.

 

Unfortunately the OP's location was unknown.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#11 YSJ

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Posted 09 January 2017 - 06:54 AM

(response to quite an old post, though!) from US FDA website  http://www.fda.gov/S...s/ucm165546.htm Background and Definitions

 

Recalls are actions taken by a firm to remove a product from the market. Recalls may be conducted on a firm's own initiative, by FDA request, or by FDA order under statutory authority.

  • Class I recall: a situation in which there is a reasonable probability that the use of or exposure to a violative product will cause serious adverse health consequences or death.
     
  • Class II recall: a situation in which use of or exposure to a violative product may cause temporary or medically reversible adverse health consequences or where the probability of serious adverse health consequences is remote.
     
  • Class III recall: a situation in which use of or exposure to a violative product is not likely to cause adverse health consequences.
     
  • Market withdrawal: occurs when a product has a minor violation that would not be subject to FDA legal action. The firm removes the product from the market or corrects the violation. For example, a product removed from the market due to tampering, without evidence of manufacturing or distribution problems, would be a market withdrawal.

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