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Prerequisite Programs (PRP) v Operational Prerequisite Programs (OPRP)


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#1 mind over matter

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 03:23 AM

What I know is that both are considered control measure.


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#2 Bill@Kelosika

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Posted 12 January 2011 - 02:05 PM

What I know is that both are considered control measure.


My understanding is that normal prerequisite programs, which might include things like pest control in your overall premises, are designed to eliminate environmental factors that might lead to a breach in food safety but are not directly tied to the processes you use on the food itself. An operational PRP might be the regular cleaning or disenfecting of equipment or surfaces that come into direct contact with the food during processing. The program is still designed to eliminate environmental factors, and not something to do with the food itself per se, but is directly related to your processing operations.
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#3 Jomy Abraham

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Posted 14 January 2011 - 09:26 PM

CCP, OPRP and PRPs are basically deferentiating during the hazard analysis and in one word we can say that, these are the outputs of hazard analysis. Based on the severity of risk, we can classify CCP, OPRP and PRP. Mostly OPRPs are temperature controls like chiller temperature, freezer temperatures, thawing temperatures, Hot holding temperatures, cold holding temperatures blast chilling/freezing temperatures etc. and PRPs are pest control programes, personaly hygiene programs, maintenace requirements, calibrations, cleaning programmes etc. CCPs can be explained in HACCP plans and OPRPs can be explained in OPRP plan and all PRPs are basically to provide a hygiene and safe atmosphere to esnure the safe production/consumption of processed foods.

Regards
Jomy Abraham

My understanding is that normal prerequisite programs, which might include things like pest control in your overall premises, are designed to eliminate environmental factors that might lead to a breach in food safety but are not directly tied to the processes you use on the food itself. An operational PRP might be the regular cleaning or disenfecting of equipment or surfaces that come into direct contact with the food during processing. The program is still designed to eliminate environmental factors, and not something to do with the food itself per se, but is directly related to your processing operations.


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#4 Kobson

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Posted 17 January 2011 - 01:30 PM

This is a perfect explanation of the words.

Regards

Kobe

CCP, OPRP and PRPs are basically deferentiating during the hazard analysis and in one word we can say that, these are the outputs of hazard analysis. Based on the severity of risk, we can classify CCP, OPRP and PRP. Mostly OPRPs are temperature controls like chiller temperature, freezer temperatures, thawing temperatures, Hot holding temperatures, cold holding temperatures blast chilling/freezing temperatures etc. and PRPs are pest control programes, personaly hygiene programs, maintenace requirements, calibrations, cleaning programmes etc. CCPs can be explained in HACCP plans and OPRPs can be explained in OPRP plan and all PRPs are basically to provide a hygiene and safe atmosphere to esnure the safe production/consumption of processed foods.

Regards
Jomy Abraham



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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 02:43 AM

Based on the severity of risk, we can classify CCP, OPRP and PRP. Mostly OPRPs are temperature controls like chiller temperature, freezer temperatures, thawing temperatures

,

Regret that IMHO, the above statement does not concur with the concept / some published results / text of ISO 22000. It's true that considerable subjectivity is implied (and utilised) by the 00/04 standard(s) textual ambiguities but large simplifications are preferably spelled out.

Although not specifically incorrect, use of the phrase "severity of risk" is also awkward since "severity" is popularly also used to estimate the "potential consequence" component of many risk definitions, eg see ISO 22000 def.3.3, note 2.

I suggest some further examination of the many threads here on this topic.

Rgds / Charles.C
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#6 Simon

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Posted 28 January 2011 - 07:40 PM

What do you think of the answers Mind Over Matter?


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#7 mind over matter

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 05:28 AM

What do you think of the answers Mind Over Matter?

This is my understanding on the replies. Let say we have plants located at different sites and I was assigned in the head office. The PRP’s can be written even without knowing processes of all the plantsby simply addressing the following areas:



a) Construction & lay- out of buildings and associated utilities

b) Lay- out of premises, including work space and employee facilities

c) Supplies of air, water, energy and other utilities

d) Supporting services, including sewage and disposal

e) Suitability of equipment and accessibility for cleaning, maintenance and preventive maintenance

f) Management of purchased materials and handling of products

g) Measures of prevention of cross contamination

h) Cleaning and sanitizing

i) Pest control

j) Personnel hygiene





For example, I can write a general cleaning procedure dealing how to clean. This procedure (PRP) will apply to all plants while OPRP’s we cannot write without knowing the processes. Please advice if I understood it right.


Sure, I will do further examination of the many threads here on this topic.


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#8 Simon

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 08:19 AM

MOM I don’t know if you are a food manufacturing business, but if you are you may want to consider FSSC 22000 Certification as opposed to ISO 22000 as FSSC 22000 has GFSI approval.

The reason being the FSSC 22000 standard is designed for food manufacturers who supply or plan to supply their products to major food retailers or major branded food companies and combines the ISO 22000 Food Safety Management standard with the Publicly Available Specification (PAS) 220 and other additional requirements.

BSI PAS 220 (ISO/TS 22002-1) was developed specifically to define prerequisite programmes for manufacturing operations to support ISO 22000 and ensure that the FSSC 22000 scheme met the GFSI requirements.

The requirements of ISO/TS 22002-1 and PAS220 are identical and so the FSSC Board accepts ISO/TS 22002-1 equally with PAS220. PAS 220 & ISO/TS 22002-1:2009 specify detailed requirements to be specifically considered in relation to ISO 22000:2005, 7.2.3. In addition, they add other aspects which are considered relevant to manufacturing operations: 1) rework; 2) product recall procedures; 3) warehousing; 4) product information and consumer awareness; 5) food defence, biovigilance, and bioterrorism.

You can read the full article here: FSSC 22000 set to become the Global FSMS Standard

I think it is important to get a copy of one of the above specifications to use with ISO 22000.

By the way you may be able to get a combined ISO 22000 (FSSC 22000) and ISO 9001 audit, I am checking with SGS and will let you know.

Regards,
Simon


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#9 Charles.C

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 05:37 PM

Dear MOM,

For example, I can write a general cleaning procedure dealing how to clean


With no details of the product/process ?

Yes you can do it but it will be a book. :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C
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#10 Jomy Abraham

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Posted 01 February 2011 - 06:16 PM

Dear MOM

Suppose if you are writing a PRP of cleaning and sanitization procedure without visiting the unit, how do you judge the control measure. for example,

1. if the unit has a Butchery machine and if your imagination of meat cutting process is manual ( just imagine quantity is very less and hence manual cutting is sufficient), how do you define the cleaning and sanitization process of meat cutting machine.
2. If the unit is using moving trolleys to move processed food within the unit and suppose grease or mineral oil or similar chemical is used to smoothen the running condition of trolley, how do you define control measure to prevent this chemical hazard...

so in general, its must to deifne the process flow first, secondly conduct the hazard anlayis of each steps defined in the process flows which will help to define the 1. potential hazard
2. potential sources
3. Risk level ( based on the incident happend in your units. If its happened several times, risk level should be high)
4. Decision ( here you need to define whether its CCP, OPRP or PRP based on your decision tree and decisions)
5. Define Control measures of each potential sources/hazard
6. Justify the decision.

If you sit in HO and define, there is a chance to miss lot of POTENTIAL SOURCES.
Its always better to understand each and every process, equipments and all related sources to define the CCP, OPRP and PRP and this will support you to develop strong sytems in your units.

Regards
Jomy Abraham


This is my understanding on the replies. Let say we have plants located at different sites and I was assigned in the head office. The PRP’s can be written even without knowing processes of all the plantsby simply addressing the following areas:



a) Construction & lay- out of buildings and associated utilities

b) Lay- out of premises, including work space and employee facilities

c) Supplies of air, water, energy and other utilities

d) Supporting services, including sewage and disposal

e) Suitability of equipment and accessibility for cleaning, maintenance and preventive maintenance

f) Management of purchased materials and handling of products

g) Measures of prevention of cross contamination

h) Cleaning and sanitizing

i) Pest control

j) Personnel hygiene





For example, I can write a general cleaning procedure dealing how to clean. This procedure (PRP) will apply to all plants while OPRP’s we cannot write without knowing the processes. Please advice if I understood it right.


Sure, I will do further examination of the many threads here on this topic.



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#11 mind over matter

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 04:46 AM

Dear MOM

Suppose if you are writing a PRP of cleaning and sanitization procedure without visiting the unit, how do you judge the control measure. for example,

1. if the unit has a Butchery machine and if your imagination of meat cutting process is manual ( just imagine quantity is very less and hence manual cutting is sufficient), how do you define the cleaning and sanitization process of meat cutting machine.
2. If the unit is using moving trolleys to move processed food within the unit and suppose grease or mineral oil or similar chemical is used to smoothen the running condition of trolley, how do you define control measure to prevent this chemical hazard...

so in general, its must to deifne the process flow first, secondly conduct the hazard anlayis of each steps defined in the process flows which will help to define the 1. potential hazard
2. potential sources
3. Risk level ( based on the incident happend in your units. If its happened several times, risk level should be high)
4. Decision ( here you need to define whether its CCP, OPRP or PRP based on your decision tree and decisions)
5. Define Control measures of each potential sources/hazard
6. Justify the decision.

If you sit in HO and define, there is a chance to miss lot of POTENTIAL SOURCES.
Its always better to understand each and every process, equipments and all related sources to define the CCP, OPRP and PRP and this will support you to develop strong sytems in your units.

Regards
Jomy Abraham



Hi Jomy Abraham,
Thank you for your excellent reply. How about the idea of request them to send me their process flow and/or results of hazard analysis (if any), a list of equipments and go from there.

Do you think I can evaluate at that point what has to be done? Or should I leave writing procedures, PRP’s and OPRP’s later, till I arrived at there plant?





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#12 Jomy Abraham

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Posted 02 February 2011 - 05:39 AM

Thanks MOM

My suggestions ( if you want to restrict your visit to one time)
1. Intruct plant team to prepare a process flow chart and sent to you
2. You just review from your ideas,experiences, discussion with your colleagues in plant
3. conduct hazard analysis
4. Prepare an idea of CCP, OPRP and PRP or you can prepare it
5. Sent all the process flows and other Procedures related to PRPs etc to the HODs of each section in the plant ot other units.
6. Communicate your date of visit in the plants and review with each HOD ( be specific in time)
7. Have a primary audit along with each HODs
8. Conduct the review meeting to finalize their own specific SOPs
9. Consolidate all feedbacks and finalize the total SOPs of the org
10. Conduct a Food Safety executive team meeting for final approval of all sops, prps, oprps, ccps etc....

IF someone cand add more, please...

Regards
Jomy Abraham

Hi Jomy Abraham,
Thank you for your excellent reply. How about the idea of request them to send me their process flow and/or results of hazard analysis (if any), a list of equipments and go from there.

Do you think I can evaluate at that point what has to be done? Or should I leave writing procedures, PRP’s and OPRP’s later, till I arrived at there plant?










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