Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
* * * * - 1 votes

Anyone using Per Acetic Acid as Sanitiser - Please share experience


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Gourav

Gourav

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 71 posts
  • 17 thanks

  • India
    India
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Delhi

Posted 13 May 2011 - 12:14 PM

Hi,
Just got introduced to per acetic acid to be used as sanitiser.
We have using Chlorine in difefrent concentration.

Anybody using peracetic acid already. Appreciate if you can share the experience.

Thanks

Warm Regards

Gourav


  • 0

#2 Naamfon

Naamfon

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 66 posts
  • 46 thanks

  • Thailand
    Thailand
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Searching , Finding & learning new knowledge and other language (still fair in english..lol). create good friends, Travel , share good thing , eat and eating.

Posted 13 May 2011 - 06:45 PM

Dear Gourav ,

My company used PAA for high care products of Japan customer . It's good forused :thumbup: but expensive than chlorine a bit.
PAA (Peracetic Acid)is anti-microbial agent same likechlorine, it is equilibrium mixture of acetic acid, water,hydrogen peroxide andperacetic acid


CH3COOH + H2O2 forword CH3COOOH + H2O
Acetic acid +Hydrogen peroxide reverse Peracetic acid (PAA) + water



FDA approved for Direct Food Contact

- 21CFR 173.135 (Fruits, Vegetables)

- 21CFR 173.370 (Meat, Poultry, Seafood)

FDA approved as Sanitizer on Food Contact Surface

-21 CFR 178.1010

EPA approved as pesticide

- EPA # 65402-1

- EPA # 65402-3

You can choose for used depened on cost , customer , your products . :biggrin:


Regards,

Naamfon



Edited by Naamfon, 13 May 2011 - 06:48 PM.

  • 0

Thanked by 2 Members:
George Howlett , Zeeshan

#3 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 2,032 posts
  • 395 thanks

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 14 May 2011 - 04:31 PM

The big benefit to peracetic acid is as the PP said, it reacts to form acetic acid (constituent of vinegar) so there isn't that much of a risk to product apart from a small taint risk.

One thing to be very careful of though is if you have any chlorine containing chemicals on site e.g. hypochlorite tablets in drains as you may then end up with chlorine gas and dead employees. Not good. Posted Image

I think I might have used it in one site as a fogging agent but I didn't manage the process, sorry!


  • 0

#4 Naamfon

Naamfon

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 66 posts
  • 46 thanks

  • Thailand
    Thailand
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Searching , Finding & learning new knowledge and other language (still fair in english..lol). create good friends, Travel , share good thing , eat and eating.

Posted 15 May 2011 - 10:11 AM

Yes I agree with GMO .
Many factory used Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for sanitising processing equipment , water purification. It is used on a large scale for surface purification, bleaching, odor removal and water disinfection.
My company diluted
Sodium hypochlorite solution (10% ) to 100 ppm for cleaning processing equipment .
Advantages
It can easily and be stored and transported when it is produced on-site. Transport and storage of sodium hypochlorite are safe. Sodium hypochlorite is as effective as chlorine gas for disinfection. Sodium hypochlorite produces residual disinfectant.
Disadvantages
Sodium hypochlorite is a dangerous and corrosive substance. Sodium hypochlorite should not come in contact with air, because that will cause it to disintegrate.



Edited by Naamfon, 15 May 2011 - 05:59 PM.

  • 0

#5 George Howlett

George Howlett

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • Corporate Sponsor
  • 374 posts
  • 286 thanks

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ireland and USA

Posted 15 May 2011 - 10:52 AM

Peracetic acid has been used for many years in the Dairy and Beverage industries because of its beneficial properties. Since it breaks down in to relatively harmless substances over a short time it can be ideal for Cleaning in Place (CIP) systems as a final stage sanitizer.

From my experience, lines and machines can be purged with the chemical and left overnight. Something that can't be done with chlorine based chemicals which are more corrosive and cause damage to rubber seals etc. It can then be rinsed through with cold water before starting production. This has significant benefits for productivity and quality control and can often out-weigh the high cost of the chemical.

Another common application for peracetic acid is in the pre-rinsing of various containers (e.g. PET) prior to filling and packing. It can be added to the water used for rinsing containers at the jet wash stage before entering the filling and packing stage. Again depending on the product, the application will not impact on the product while reducing any microbial load within the container.

As mentioned in previous posts make sure you review your COSHH data and OHS risk assessment before using it. If your chemical supplier is good they will work with you on this and confirm the chemical is suitable and approved for your business and the intended use of the chemical.


  • 0

#6 Dr Ajay Shah

Dr Ajay Shah

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 318 posts
  • 105 thanks

  • Australia
    Australia
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 15 May 2011 - 12:41 PM

Hi Gourav,

I am very familiar with Peracetic acid (PAA) in the fruit and vegetable processing industry. Ecolab are very good at providing this product as Tsunami 100 0r 200 and I am sure you will have a representative of Ecolab in your country to give you more information. you can look up Tsunami 100 on Google and you will get plenty of information. In the fruit and vegetable industry you use it at 60 - 80 ppm for a non rinse application and above 80 ppm you will need a potable rinse.


As GMO rightly points out that you must store all chlorinated cleaning agents away from peracetic acid as it reacts to give off Chlorine gas.



Please be ware that Peractic acid is also a corrosive substance. Tsunami 100 is comprised of other chemicals including Hydrogen Peroxide and Peroxyactic acid as well. Sometimes if you use it to sanitise onions then the natural sulphites in onions will neutralise the acidic component and the peroxide is the biocide which will still be active so you may have to monitor the peroxide by titration or test strips.


If you are not aware of COSHH it is a chemical risk that is being assesses in UK (including ireland). Other countries may have something similar.


  • 0

#7 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 11,313 posts
  • 2767 thanks

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 16 May 2011 - 05:05 AM

Dear All,

I hv no direct experience on peracetic acid so i can only offer hearsay.

From my own experience, handling 10% Na hypochlorite solution is a very unpleasant job due to the fumes and corrosive capabilities (eg it will transform blue trousers to purple instantaneously :biggrin: ). Ca hypochlorite powder approx 70% is arguably even worse due particularly to conc.level / skin corrosiveness / airborne fume characteristics / fire-generative properties.

Both should be handled exclusively in a separate, designated, well-ventilated area and by appropriately trained personnel. Unfortunately these requirements are frequently by-passed IMEX.

I previously enquired to a supplier regarding peracetic acid and was informed that handling was more difficult than above items. End of story in my case.

Of course, a specific process may necessitate specific requirements but i suspect that in general Na hypochlorite is probably still the No.1 used item (obviously cost is also a related factor, rightly or wrongly).
(I daresay users of CIP systems will hv different opinions to above ?)

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

#8 earthworminmysoup

earthworminmysoup

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 11 posts
  • 3 thanks

  • Poland
    Poland

Posted 16 May 2011 - 03:16 PM

Just a footnote really. PAA shouldn't be used as a sanitiser as it doesn't perform any detergent action. So using PAA on or in a soiled area will have little effect.

Peracetic should be used as a terminal steriliant to reduce microbial loading after a detergent cycle of say Sodium Hydroxide to remove dirt.


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:
Charles.C

#9 bala_s

bala_s

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 11 posts
  • 4 thanks

  • India
    India
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 May 2011 - 01:54 PM

dear memebrs,

recently one of the PAA supplier came and given all the product details and had given fogging demonstration.
like charles said, sodium hypochloride is very effective and less priced sanitizing agent when compred to PAA and chlorine dioxide.
my aim is to use PAA in final rince or mix in chilling water. also fumigating dry food handling area including microbioloigal lab.
the supplier came and had given fooging demonstration in dry room with 0.2% PAA solution. he had told us that peopel can stand in front of fogg and it is saff.
but not much difference in TPC after fogging. even table rincing with 2% PAA had not given much difference in TPC.

now i had asked them to send some sample for my validaiton study purpose.
i can post my experience, after my study.


regards/bala


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:
Charles.C

#10 agwanda

agwanda

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 81 posts
  • 8 thanks

  • Kenya
    Kenya
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Nairobi, Kenya
  • Interests:Quality Management Systems, Food Safety (ISO 22000:2005) HACCP, Microbiology, Food Processing and Packaging

Posted 10 June 2011 - 04:35 PM

Hi Gourav,

I have been Paracetic acid for atleast the last 6 months as a terminal sanitizer. The catch has been that at temperature >40C, it dissociates and therefore its efficacy is reduced.

I can attest to the fact that if well used in cold sterilization and other cleaning and fumigation processes.

I hope it helps.

Agwanda


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:
Charles.C

#11 SpiceGenius

SpiceGenius

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 17 posts
  • 3 thanks

  • Canada
    Canada

Posted 06 July 2011 - 05:20 PM

We have been using Paracetic acid for almost 2 years and it works great. We test with ATP after and get very low reading.

Out plant is a powder/dry plant but we also process meat and the paracetic acid is used in our meat processing equipment with a high success rate.

SpiceGenius.


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:
Charles.C

#12 mikysya

mikysya

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 15 posts
  • 1 thanks

  • Ukraine
    Ukraine
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Chicago, IL

Posted 12 July 2011 - 07:39 PM

We have been using PAA in a fog tunnel for tomatoes. Moreover, we had around 200 ppm and that concentration worked fine. I think it's great for produce as alternative for chlorine wash


  • 0

#13 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 11,313 posts
  • 2767 thanks

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 13 July 2011 - 03:46 AM

Dear mikysya,

Thks for the comment but it would be nice if "works fine" had some quantitative validation as well. :smile: (eg APC levels in/out, Salmonella / E.coli O157 etc)

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

#14 VicCherikoff

VicCherikoff

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 24 posts
  • 2 thanks

  • Australia
    Australia

Posted 14 July 2011 - 11:47 PM

I agree with you Charles. Not a lot of information in 'works fine'. The issues with peroxyacetic are the chance of free chlorine and worker safety and limited efficacy (my natural antimicrobial used as a spray or dip drops the microbial load 7-log which is a safety margin over the population found on food). PA might decay to acetic acid and water and who needs the acid around food but before it does it is pretty noxious for workers and hard on equipment.

As a food sanitizer, Herbal-Active is effective, pleasant to use and doesn't need to be rinsed off. It won't corrode equipment nor present a problem if combined with hyper-chlorinated water along the process. Strength can be monitored with a refractometer and no resistance can be acquired by target organisms.

Why wouldn't you go natural?


  • 0

#15 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 11,313 posts
  • 2767 thanks

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 15 July 2011 - 05:48 AM

Dear VicCherikoff,

Thks for the comments.

Regarding the last paragraphs, have to repeat my previous post - "Quantitative validation".

Plus meaningful approval for food systems of course, ie in addition to "natural". :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C


  • 0

#16 bsv

bsv

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 7 posts
  • 1 thanks

  • India
    India

Posted 27 July 2011 - 03:49 AM

We have been using per-acetic actid but the odour of per acetic acid is somewhat unacceptable...... there is a type of vinegar smell coming after sanitizing, so if anyone have idea to solve the odour problem, that is more appreciating

Regards

BS


  • 0

#17 noahchris97

noahchris97

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 36 posts
  • 2 thanks

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Buffalo, NY
  • Interests:Classic/ Vintage coin-op restorer of pinballs & juke boxes.
    Model ship builder.

Posted 17 October 2015 - 07:58 AM

bsv,

            The strong odor you are experincing, might be the concentration level might be to high.... At my dairy facility we are currently at 2240ppm ( Vortexx- eco lab) The acceptable range is 1300-2600ppm. anything higher might produce a odor plus it would need to be rinsed if on equipment....

 

Hope this helps


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users