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Classify PRP, OPRP, and CCP


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#1 huynh cong tai

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:07 PM

Hi

Can any one help to explain the differences among PRP, OPRP, and CCP

Thanks


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#2 KDuf

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:44 PM

Hey,

I know this has been discussed multiple times on here, so I quickly search "oprp" in the search bar and came up with a number of responses:

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__54273


http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__57197


Practical example (specific question asked by another member):

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__57440


Note 1: Notice that all links were to specific posts by Charles C. He'll probably end up adding a thoughtful response to this topic, but I figured some light reading could get you going!

Note 2: If you tried searching PRP, you probably didn't get much. That's because the search bar only searches words longer than 3 characters. I guess it's to weed out things like "an" and "the" but it can be annoying when searching... oh... I don't know... PRP for example! :whistle:


Best of luck,

KDuf


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#3 Zeeshan

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:22 AM

Hi

Can any one help to explain the differences among PRP, OPRP, and CCP

Thanks


Without going into the detail and practical example, I would like to share my thinking which I have made simplified for myself.

PRP = General GMP's applicable to any food organization irrespective of its specific field. For example Pest control. A program for pest control is equally essential for a confectionery industry and a restaurant.

OPRP = Specific GMP's applicable to a food organization with respect to its specific operations. This will be identified after systematic hazard analysis performed on specific industry. OPRP's as identified for a confectionery industry are not necessarily be same as identified for a restaurant.

CCP = Critical controls measures applicable to critical points of a specific organization. This will also be identified by systematic hazard analysis performed on specific industry.

Considering them with another perspective, lets imagine them as three security walls against food safety hazards. The outer most wall is PRP and inner most is CCP and middle one is OPRP. Breaking of the PRP wall is not as severe as of OPRP. And same analogy will be applied for PRP-CCP and OPRP-CCP combinations. This consideration would results to assess the extents of controls to be applied to all the identified food safety hazards in a simple and straight forward manner.

Regards:
Muhammad Zeeshan Zaki.
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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:14 PM

Hi

Can any one help to explain the differences among PRP, OPRP, and CCP

Thanks

Dear huynh cong tai,

I assume yr post is directed to ISO22000 (or FSSC22000).

Basically all 3 categories are control measures (CM) / programs although "CCP" usually references a location / step of application. The particular focus on using such validated/verified control measures within an enlarged (ie + OPRP) HACCP system for food safety purposes is a driving force behind the structure of ISO22000.

PRP, CCP are both defined in the ISO22000 standard and are basically the same as in most current HACCP textbooks / Codex standards respectively which i expect you are already familiar with. More specifically and conveniently, PAS220 (or ISO equivalent) specifies in great (and very readable) detail the scope for PRPs in ISO22000. This pioneering text illustrates how wide the scope of "PRP" has become so that it represents a proxy CCP in much modern usage.

OPRP was invented by ISO for the ISO22000 standard in an attempt to highlight certain CMs which although not readily risk classifiable as CCP/CMs within the traditional HACCP process analysis were nonetheless considered to be of particular importance with respect to controlling certain other (perceived significant) hazards, eg environmental. Originally the terminology seems to have been oriented more towards certain "Operational" types of (traditional) PRP but was later re-invented within the published standard so as to cover a wider conceptual range of applicable control measures. For example, in addition to "elevated" PRPs, it can include non-traditional PRP types of activity, eg filtration. The increased (unlimited?) scope is suggested in the probabilistically vague ISO definition, eg "likelihood".

There are numerous qualitative/quantitative interpretations of OPRP in the literature, eg (a) a CM of CCP "status" but which cannot be monitored continuously, (b) a control measure for a "significant" hazard but which has no readily monitorable (or perhaps definable) critical limits, © a control measure for a "significant" hazard but which does not conform to the requirements of a CCP as per the traditional Codex Decision Tree (or other trees), (d) a control measure for a "significant" hazard which fails to achieve an appropriate cumulative ("CCP") score when evaluated against the standards requirements (eg 7.4.4 a-g). Some CMs are almost defined as implemented at CCPs such as cooking but often, as implied in ISO22004, the decision as to CCP or OPRP is ultimately rather immaterial as long as the choice is validatably capable of achieving the intended level of control, ie a specified (acceptable) FS result.

A very condensed approach to specify OPRPs could be something like -

(a) do the HACCP hazard analysis > significant hazards.
(b) Note whether a proposed CM is definable as a PRP.
© if no, note whether a proposed CM can be validated as achieving the specified, acceptable FS result.
(d) If yes, apply a suitable test procedure to determine whether the CM can be logically categorised as a CCP/CM.
(e) If test result = no, > OPRP.

(Note that many other, more elaborate, system-type approaches also exist)

Rgds / Charles.C
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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#5 Rudra

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 12:02 PM

Dear huynh cong tai,

I assume yr post is directed to ISO22000 (or FSSC22000).

Basically all 3 categories are control measures (CM) / programs although "CCP" usually references a location / step of application. The particular focus on using such validated/verified control measures within an enlarged (ie + OPRP) HACCP system for food safety purposes is a driving force behind the structure of ISO22000.

PRP, CCP are both defined in the ISO22000 standard and are basically the same as in most current HACCP textbooks / Codex standards respectively which i expect you are already familiar with. More specifically and conveniently, PAS220 (or ISO equivalent) specifies in great (and very readable) detail the scope for PRPs in ISO22000. This pioneering text illustrates how wide the scope of "PRP" has become so that it represents a proxy CCP in much modern usage.

OPRP was invented by ISO for the ISO22000 standard in an attempt to highlight certain CMs which although not readily risk classifiable as CCP/CMs within the traditional HACCP process analysis were nonetheless considered to be of particular importance with respect to controlling certain other (perceived significant) hazards, eg environmental. Originally the terminology seems to have been oriented more towards certain "Operational" types of (traditional) PRP but was later re-invented within the published standard so as to cover a wider conceptual range of applicable control measures. For example, in addition to "elevated" PRPs, it can include non-traditional PRP types of activity, eg filtration. The increased (unlimited?) scope is suggested in the probabilistically vague ISO definition, eg "likelihood".

There are numerous qualitative/quantitative interpretations of OPRP in the literature, eg (a) a CM of CCP "status" but which cannot be monitored continuously, (b) a control measure for a "significant" hazard but which has no readily monitorable (or perhaps definable) critical limits, © a control measure for a "significant" hazard but which does not conform to the requirements of a CCP as per the traditional Codex Decision Tree (or other trees), (d) a control measure for a "significant" hazard which fails to achieve an appropriate cumulative ("CCP") score when evaluated against the standards requirements (eg 7.4.4 a-g). Some CMs are almost defined as implemented at CCPs such as cooking but often, as implied in ISO22004, the decision as to CCP or OPRP is ultimately rather immaterial as long as the choice is validatably capable of achieving the intended level of control, ie a specified (acceptable) FS result.

A very condensed approach to specify OPRPs could be something like -

(a) do the HACCP hazard analysis > significant hazards.
(b) Note whether a proposed CM is definable as a PRP.
© if no, note whether a proposed CM can be validated as achieving the specified, acceptable FS result.
(d) If yes, apply a suitable test procedure to determine whether the CM can be logically categorised as a CCP/CM.
(e) If test result = no, > OPRP.

(Note that many other, more elaborate, system-type approaches also exist)

Rgds / Charles.C


Hi guys / Charles,

I had a big discussion with my trainer HACCP last week.
I am certified ISO 22000 and according to clause 7.4.4, 'The control measures selected shall be categorized as to whether they need to be managed through OPRPs or by HACCP plan'.
ISO 22004 clause 7.1 :
a) the PRPs are not selected for the purpose of controlling specific identified hazards but for the purpose of maintaining a hygienic production , processing and / or hndling environement.

b) OPRPs that manage those control measures that the hazard analysis identifies as necessary to control identified hazards to acceptable levels. and which are not otherwise managed by HACCP plan

As far as I understand, my hazards analysis table should have only OPRPs and CCPs ( no PRPs). PRPs should always be present but not in categorisation of control measures.

The trainer told me that ISO 22000 doesnot force us to have any OPRPs and we can identify control measures as PRPs, CCPs or OPRPs ( if we found).
I disagreed with her.
Because its clear from ISO 22000 that hazards having significant risks should be managed by OPRPs and CCPs. We cant escape from this. She said that hazards can also be managed through PRPs.

My questions:

1) any more discussions to argue with her?
2) a model of HAZARDS analysis table for ISO 22000.


Best regards,
Shakti




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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 01:47 PM

Hi guys / Charles,

I had a big discussion with my trainer HACCP last week.
I am certified ISO 22000 and according to clause 7.4.4, 'The control measures selected shall be categorized as to whether they need to be managed through OPRPs or by HACCP plan'.
ISO 22004 clause 7.1 :
a) the PRPs are not selected for the purpose of controlling specific identified hazards but for the purpose of maintaining a hygienic production , processing and / or hndling environement.

b) OPRPs that manage those control measures that the hazard analysis identifies as necessary to control identified hazards to acceptable levels. and which are not otherwise managed by HACCP plan

As far as I understand, my hazards analysis table should have only OPRPs and CCPs ( no PRPs). PRPs should always be present but not in categorisation of control measures.

The trainer told me that ISO 22000 doesnot force us to have any OPRPs and we can identify control measures as PRPs, CCPs or OPRPs ( if we found).
I disagreed with her.
Because its clear from ISO 22000 that hazards having significant risks should be managed by OPRPs and CCPs. We cant escape from this. She said that hazards can also be managed through PRPs.

My questions:

1) any more discussions to argue with her?
2) a model of HAZARDS analysis table for ISO 22000.


Best regards,
Shakti


Dear Rudra,

If your trainer's procedure and her product / process / environment are the same as mine, IMO she may be correct. :smile:

See the excel sheet here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__50651

Rgds / Charles.C
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Charles.C


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#7 Rudra

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 03:52 PM

Dear Rudra,

If your trainer's procedure and her product / process / environment are the same as mine, IMO she may be correct. :smile:

See the excel sheet here -

http://www.ifsqn.com...dpost__p__50651

Rgds / Charles.C


Hello Charles,

Thanks for your comment but I am totally confused.
Your hazards analysis table doesnot contain any PRPs.
This means I am right.

Regards,
Sahkti
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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 24 March 2013 - 08:23 PM

Hello Charles,

Thanks for your comment but I am totally confused.
Your hazards analysis table doesnot contain any PRPs.
This means I am right.

Regards,
Sahkti


Dear Rudra,

For PRPs, see Column E. I presume you are familiar with the use of PAS 220.

Perhaps I / you / your trainer are using different procedures. Maybe you can post your tables for hazard analysis and categorisation of control measures for OPRP / CCP for comment ?.

Rgds / Charles.C

PS -

Because its clear from ISO 22000 that hazards having significant risks should be managed by OPRPs and CCPs. We cant escape from this. She said that hazards can also be managed through PRPs.


The first sentence is only correct after completing an "appropriate" choice of PRPs from, say, PAS 220. Maybe this is what yr trainer's third sentence meant. The decision regarding "appropriate" may be debatable, eg see my Note 20 in excel sheet.
There are a variety of ( probably equally valid) opinions as to what constitutes a "correct" (ie auditorially satisfactory) implementation of ISO 22000 with respect to section 7. Some further guidance is given in ISO 22004 but the final result is still often "flexible" IMO. Just like traditional HACCP. :smile:
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#9 Rudra

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 05:34 PM

Dear Rudra,

For PRPs, see Column E. I presume you are familiar with the use of PAS 220.

Perhaps I / you / your trainer are using different procedures. Maybe you can post your tables for hazard analysis and categorisation of control measures for OPRP / CCP for comment ?.

Rgds / Charles.C

PS -



The first sentence is only correct after completing an "appropriate" choice of PRPs from, say, PAS 220. Maybe this is what yr trainer's third sentence meant. The decision regarding "appropriate" may be debatable, eg see my Note 20 in excel sheet.
There are a variety of ( probably equally valid) opinions as to what constitutes a "correct" (ie auditorially satisfactory) implementation of ISO 22000 with respect to section 7. Some further guidance is given in ISO 22004 but the final result is still often "flexible" IMO. Just like traditional HACCP. :smile:


Dear Charles,

Hope you are doing. Sorry for disturbing. I don't understand column E (PAS 220) - assisting PRPs. What's its importance? What is PAS220? Its is 22004?

Thanks,
rgds,
Shakti


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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 06:45 AM


Dear Charles,

Hope you are doing. Sorry for disturbing. I don't understand column E (PAS 220) - assisting PRPs. What's its importance? What is PAS220? Its is 22004?

Thanks,
rgds,
Shakti


Dear Rudra,

PAS220 is a document which basically lists / details GMP / GHP etc aspects (and including certain FS hazards) which can (should? must?) be covered by PRPs as per the intention of the iso22000 standard, plus a few more. (Some specific elements are IMO better not handled by PRPs [ie my Note20 in prev.post] but never mind smile.gif ). Generally, it's usage makes life much more easy / quotable / unchallengeable, when doing section 7.4.

Additionally, use of PAS220 (more accurately its replacement iso 22002-1, see below) is necessary if wishing to "upgrade" from iso22000 to FSSC22000, the latter standard being compliant to GFSI requirements.

Note that the final, 2008, version of PAS220 document (for food manufacturers) was subsequently withdrawn and the content reissued as an ISO publication, ISO/TS 22002-1.

More details here –

http://shop.bsigroup...000000030181317

Rgds / Charles.C
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Charles.C


#11 Rudra

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 04:10 PM


Dear Rudra,

PAS220 is a document which basically lists / details GMP / GHP etc aspects (and including certain FS hazards) which can (should? must?) be covered by PRPs as per the intention of the iso22000 standard, plus a few more. (Some specific elements are IMO better not handled by PRPs [ie my Note20 in prev.post] but never mind smile.gif ). Generally, it's usage makes life much more easy / quotable / unchallengeable, when doing section 7.4.

Additionally, use of PAS220 (more accurately its replacement iso 22002-1, see below) is necessary if wishing to "upgrade" from iso22000 to FSSC22000, the latter standard being compliant to GFSI requirements.

Note that the final, 2008, version of PAS220 document (for food manufacturers) was subsequently withdrawn and the content reissued as an ISO publication, ISO/TS 22002-1.

More details here –

http://shop.bsigroup...000000030181317
Rgds / Charles.C


Many thanks Charles. Great info. Very useful indeed. I guess there will be no problem using this together with ISO 22000.

Cheers
Rudra
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#12 Rudra

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 09:12 AM

Hello Charles,

 

Hope you are doing fine. I revert back to this topic after a long time. I am certified ISO 22000:2005 for food safety, can I buy and use the PAS220? I dont see anywhere in ISO 22000that PAS220 is recommended. How can I use it in conjunction with 22000?

 

Rgds,

Shakti


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#13 Simon

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:04 AM

PAS 220 is withdrawn.

 

PAS 220 = ISO/TS 22002-1


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#14 Charles.C

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:56 AM

Hello Charles,

 

Hope you are doing fine. I revert back to this topic after a long time. I am certified ISO 22000:2005 for food safety, can I buy and use the PAS220? I dont see anywhere in ISO 22000that PAS220 is recommended. How can I use it in conjunction with 22000?

 

Rgds,

Shakti

 

Dear Rudra,

 

See my links in posts 10,11 again :smile: . As per Simon, PAS220 now discontinued but replaced by the identical iso22002-1 (for food).

 

I already explained its use above. ? See the excel file in post 6 above and the surrounding posts in the source link.

 

PAS220 was launched 2008, ie after iso22000, for the purpose of people who required a GFSI approved standard, eg FSSC22000. It includes a few more PRPs than specified in the iso22000 list (a-j).

 

I can’t give you a definitive answer to PAS220 applicability for iso22000 ( I don’t use the standard myself) but since iso22000- 7.2.3 leaves the choice open, looks ok to me although the (few) extra PRPs may not be necessary as per (a-j) unless you feel adventurous.

 

You can get a nearly identical, free, version of PAS220  from the “Synergy” link in this post (looks still functional) –

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...000/#entry32938

(Post #4 of above thread compares content of Synergy / PAS220 versions.)

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Charles.C


#15 dk636

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 06:54 PM

What if there are no more than 2 CCPs?


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#16 Simon

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Posted 22 September 2013 - 07:08 PM

What if there are no more than 2 CCPs?

 

Nothing.


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