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Food Safety Culture – what does it mean

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#1 Simon

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Posted 12 May 2013 - 07:10 PM

Food Safety Culture – what does it mean?
Bill McBride, Chair, Auditor Competence Scheme Committee, GFSI


The main issue exercising GFSI and the GFSI benchmarked schemes presently is management commitment and how management influences the presence or lack of a food safety culture within a food business. Investigating some of the recent ‘failures’ of food safety certified businesses recently leads to the conclusion that most failed due to lack of management commitment – playing lip service to the standard – focussing on the need for a certificate to capture a market rather than what the certificate represents. This session will debate this issue and seek some potential solutions.

 

If you have a question related to this presentation please post it below.

 

 

<<Link to the Webinar recording>>


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Simon Timperley
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#2 Zeeshan

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 05:41 AM

In my opinion all the main interested parties are responsible for not promoting the food safety culture. The respective Standard Development organization,  the Accrediation Body (AB), the Certification Body (CB) and the food company. 

 

If a student is passed by open cheating in an examination then undoubtedly that student was a culprit but ignoring the loopholes of the whole examnimation system is also a blunder.

 

I think at one end some of the standards or partthereof have been made so complicated that small and medium sized company especially have no way to adopt wrong ways to fulfil the funny or overburdened requirements. AB's have no stingent system to scruinize the CB's. Most of the CB's have no ethics to make the auditee more sensible and result-oriented rather than NCR's or documentatation-oriented. Last but not least, the company have no time put more focus on value adding activities.

 

Solution? The main character of this play the AB should make an stringent schedule of assessment and grading of CB's. It should also guide the international and local customers/traders to adopt or develop reasonable standards.  The second character, the company should worked hard to make the requirements more simple in order to promote food safety culture to the grass root level. 


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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 06:27 AM

Dear Zeeshan,

 

I particularly agree with the opening sentence of  yr 3rd paragraph.

 

But don't forget that , rightly or wrongly, many requirements for (and within) some of the standards have customer "due diligence" lurking in the background. And this is probably an infinitely  expanding list.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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#4 Simon

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 09:08 AM

Great presentation Bill. :clap:

 

Bill talks about the importance of culture for an effective FSMS.

I wonder how many CEO’s attending FSL13 today?

 

Personally, I think we need not look too far from Deming's 14 points (old but still very relevant) for guidelines to develop an effective culture of food safety, quality, H & S management.  Makes good business sense too...

 

The questions and comments made during the presentation:

 

  • Nice to hear you Bill! I'm Luis Saucedo from the recently created GFSI Local Group Mexico...
  • With this solution from GFSI buyers still ask for many standards to be adopted
  • Why not Industry organisations for collaboration? With Govt , scheme holders , retailers etc.
  • As an auditor I agree to Frank..very hard to change human behavior-soft stuff.
  • "Mindset Change" is key to Food Safety Culture
  • Kulcha is one of the Indian breads!!!
  • I find this discussion highly value.  As food safety practitioners we focus on technical knowledge and standards (IQ of an organisation) but we overlook the human behaviour (EQ).  Daniel Goleman in his book "Working with Emotional Intelligence' give a good insight of an EQ of an organisation.
  • Bill, the auditors for any GFSI benchmarked scheme are technical people, oriented to hard stuff, not the soft stuff at all. How to the deal then with the competence of the auditor in the future?
  • What are the major faults usually seen with regard to FSC?
  • Do u think food safety culture will get brought in as its on section of the main food safety standards?
  • Is food safety culture reflect the training of the organization personnel or its personal attitudes?
  • My question is: what assures that third party bodies even when checking against benchmarked scheme, that they would not going again into the passivity since they aim at profit at the end and they may give flexibility to manufacturers?
  • Thank you, could you explain the role of auditors for providing food safety culture plus assessment of real standards and GFSI scheme?
  • Can you pls. little more elaborate on Hard Stuff & Soft Stuff?
  • Is there any method to do a food safety diagnosis?
  • Congratulations for your presentation. I have a question, do you think that we will see an unique universal food safety standard in the future
  • Thanks!!
  • Food safety culture & organisation culture how
  • The accepted Dutch HACCP has been removed from the GFSI scheme. How is that?

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Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
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Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

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#5 bevisangus

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 07:37 AM

A food safety culture is the expression of traditional values and beliefs. It represents the "flywheel of conventional thinking" among a working group. When a restaurant knows that their poor hand hygiene and their high-touch surface cleanliness practices are risky but yet operates just as it did in past years, it is an expression of their food safety culture. It is a green light to continue. It is a barrier to change.


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