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How are you accomplishing the awareness training of allergen controls?

Employee Training / Awareness

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#1 Tony Z

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 09:01 PM

Hello Everyone - Food Packaging Printer working towards SQF Code 7.1 Level 1 - Control of Allergens Procedure complete, All raw material and ingredients risks assessment completed, process risk assessment completed. My question surrounds employee training. How are you accomplishing the awareness training for the importance of allergen knowledge, allergen controls in place, importance of process tasks such as case and pallet labeling, etc. We have a large contingent of Mexican workers as well and translating documents is not a problem.  


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#2 Tony-C

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 11:53 AM

Hello Everyone - Food Packaging Printer working towards SQF Code 7.1 Level 1 - Control of Allergens Procedure complete, All raw material and ingredients risks assessment completed, process risk assessment completed. My question surrounds employee training. How are you accomplishing the awareness training for the importance of allergen knowledge, allergen controls in place, importance of process tasks such as case and pallet labeling, etc. We have a large contingent of Mexican workers as well and translating documents is not a problem.  

 

Hi Tony,

 

I would normally do this with classroom and on the job training. Systems to aid the employees identify relevant packaging are extremely important so designated storage areas, colour coded labels, colour coded bags, clearly displayed notices and instructions in all appropriate languages etc. can assist.

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#3 Tony Z

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 01:49 PM

Thanks Tony - I forgot to mention that although we have a procedure for allergen control and risk assessments completed, we don't have any allergens in our processes to be controlled - the only allergens are in the lunchroom and GMP hand washing and no food in manufacturing controsl that.

 

Tony


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#4 Brenda L

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 02:29 PM

Tony Z

I am in a similar stuation of food packaging manufactring where we currently are looking at how to acquire allergen information from our suppliers regarding our raw materials. How did you do this?


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#5 sci

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 02:48 PM

Training is important. And document this training.

 

Also in our lunchroom and processing walls, we have posters of the 8 major food allergens in English and Spanish. If an auditor asks any employee, the employees can show the auditor.


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#6 Tony Z

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:45 PM

Hi Brenda L. - We contacted all of our raw material suppliers and asked them for a statement letter on their control of allergens in the manufacturing environment - We have one supplier that had an allergen in a place I didn't expect but glad I thought to ask - Roll Cores - Soy Protein is a common ingredient in the clay coating of the paper material - we listed it on out Risk assessment however the risk is extremely low due to 1) the amount included in the core and 2) the virtual impossible method of a food packing company using the last 9-18" on the roll that come into contact with the core - packaging machines  would splice into the next roll and discard the splice and a few packages before and after the splice due to the stopped machine condition. 


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