Jump to content

Social Media Hook (BETA)
  •  
Photo
- - - - -

Cooking temperature & cooling guidelines for meats


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 suemal

suemal

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 47 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Wales
    Wales
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:wales

Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:04 PM

Hi All
Currently working on our HACCP plans for cooked meats, that is joints of beef etc and cooked chickens, I am looking for the guidelines as to what core temperature we should be acheiving and also the guidelines for cooling times/temp. As the factory is about 3 months from opening we have not subscribed to any associations who might help us, so any info will be much appreciated :thumbup:
Thanks
Sue


  • 0

#2 petegilmartin

petegilmartin

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 15 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

Posted 14 December 2005 - 02:08 PM

Below is a link to cooking guidelines from the Food Standards Agency. Interestingly, 75C is listed as the core temperature. I have just completed REHIS Intermediate Food Hygiene and the EHO's in Scotland recommend 82C as core temperature. Also, you should set your own limits in your HACCP above the guideline, allowing yourself some leeway +/- 2C.

Also in Scotland, 5-63C is the danger zone
Hot holding temperature +63C
Freezing -18C or below

http://www.food.gov....csctcooking.pdf


  • 0

#3 petegilmartin

petegilmartin

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 15 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

Posted 14 December 2005 - 02:20 PM

My apologies. 75C is the core temp. 82C must be reached if re-heating. Cooling is ASAP. EHO recommends 90 mins


  • 0

#4 suemal

suemal

    Grade - AIFSQN

  • IFSQN Associate
  • 47 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Wales
    Wales
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:wales

Posted 14 December 2005 - 04:33 PM

My apologies. 75C is the core temp. 82C must be reached if re-heating. Cooling is ASAP. EHO recommends 90 mins


Thank Pete
cooling temps pretty strict, they must have changed last time i worked in cooked meats factory it was something like down to 50 in 2 hours then down to 10 in another 2 hours and so on....we will have to have pretty good blast chillers to get to a temp of less than 5 in 90min
sue
  • 0

#5 bibi

bibi

    Grade - MIFSQN

  • IFSQN Member
  • 102 posts
  • 2 thanks
0
Neutral

Posted 04 April 2006 - 10:56 PM

quality or safety?

cooking chick peas need at least 90 minutes to be cooked (boiling during the all process)

what is the critical limit then if it's a ccp?

bibi


  • 0

#6 Jean

Jean

    Grade - SIFSQN

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 429 posts
  • 5 thanks
1
Neutral

  • India
    India
  • Gender:Female

Posted 25 June 2008 - 01:00 PM

quality or safety?

cooking chick peas need at least 90 minutes to be cooked (boiling during the all process)

what is the critical limit then if it's a ccp?

bibi





The critical limit for cooking will be 75oC irrespective of the time taken for boiling the chick peas.



cooling temps pretty strict, they must have changed last time i worked in cooked meats factory it was something like down to 50 in 2 hours then down to 10 in another 2 hours and so on....we will have to have pretty good blast chillers to get to a temp of less than 5 in 90min
sue




In our catering unit, before we had blast chillers, we used the ice bath / ice slurry method where temperature of food was allowed to cool to 20oC in 2 hours then placed in the chiller where the temperature reduced to 5oC or below in 4 hours.
  • 0
Best regards,

J

Only the curious will learn and only the resolute overcome the obstacles to learning. The quest quotient has always excited me more than the intelligence quotient. Eugene S Wilson

#7 GMO

GMO

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Fellow
  • 1,709 posts
  • 270 thanks
22
Excellent

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 25 June 2008 - 02:29 PM

Remember that the cooking temperature also has a time associated with it. The food standards agency is a useful source but most of their information is aimed at caterers.

The 75 degrees thing I think comes from lethal rates for Listeria. From my handy CFA (chilled food association) best practice guidelines, http://www.chilledfood.org/ (an expensive but good book is available, at £100):

At 75 degrees, you need to hold the temperature for 26 seconds to acheive a 6 log reduction.

Be realistic. How many times do you see an operator probe something for half a minute??? I would prefer to go for 80 degrees if you can acheive it without drying out the meat, then you only need to hold it for 5 seconds which is a bit more pragmatic.

I remember having more problems with cooling time because there isn't much literature. With any cooling process though, you're looking to control spore formers mainly and any surviving vegetative bacteria. For meat, if you do a literature search probably on Clostridium perfringens growth in meat, you might find something useful although the best idea is to use some literature as a basis and then test it with your product.

I always used to use 4 hours from maximum temperature to below 5 which we used blast chilling for. Anything up to 8 hours, we'd test indicator organisms and if it was a product we'd had previous issues with, it would be automatically rejected over 4 hours.


Edited by GMO, 25 June 2008 - 02:34 PM.

  • 0

#8 Charles.C

Charles.C

    Grade - FIFSQN

  • IFSQN Moderator
  • 7,357 posts
  • 1520 thanks
149
Excellent

  • Earth
    Earth
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:SF
    TV
    Movies

Posted 25 June 2008 - 02:32 PM

Dear All,

Is it safe to eat chick peas which are not 'fully"cooked although having reached a core temp. of 75degC (time seems unspecified??)

Microbiologically, the answer is probably yes (reference species / matrix?) but .....I Have never eaten chick peas AFAIK however have just purchased some frozen peas stated as requiring 3-5min in boiling water. The result was similar to a bullet, definitely a physical risk to the teeth IMO. Perhaps the ccp needs a little thought :smile: .

Rgds / Charles.C

added - just saw GMO's nice scientific addendum. The only problem there can be the converse of mine above - the result is something which becomes uneatable.
As noted, L.mono.... is the usual ref. in Europe but I think not in the USA where salmonella (spp?) rules.
added (2) - if it's of any interest I saw this rather neat official summary concerning holding of particularly RTE foods -

http://www.foodstand...or_printing.pdf


  • 0




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users