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Limitations on Pesticide Application In Food Manufacturing & Pharm

Pest Control Pesticide

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#1 Margaux

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 03:09 PM

Dear All,

 

I just want to know your experiences in pest management procedures or standards regarding pesticide requirement and application.

 

Is pesticide (Green Labeled, non residual) application (during shut down operation) inside production area really prohibited?

 

I have encountered food manufacturing plants that do not allow chemical treatment inside production area, but when I assessed it, it is highly infested by pests and I think sanitation won't be enough to eliminate the pests. 

 

If you were the Plant Manager, would you agree on a recommendation chemical treatment on cracks, crevices (spot spraying, misting) inside the production area? (of course, this will be conducted with proper SOP)

 

Hope to hear from you.

 

Thank you.


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#2 fgjuadi

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 08:02 PM

Yes, I would agree on the recommendation to increase your response with pesticide if sanitation did not work.

As for is it prohibited?  Well, by who?  For what?

 

Allowable pesticide use is governed by your regulatory agencies, certifying bodies, and management.  It depends on toxicity, residue, legality, application, exposure risk, residual, environmental factors, the pest you're controlling, and where you use it.


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#3 AS NUR

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 12:36 AM

dear margaux,

IMO, you should consult to pest provider ? because to reduce pest on your plant, there are some treatment ex. baiting system for crawling insect and glue trap for rodent or other treatment depends on your condition.

rgds

AS Nur


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#4 Avila

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 04:42 AM

Ann,

Inside production area at my plant, we use pyrethroid group for fogging (dosage and procedure of application as directed), chemical rodent bait and electric flies killer are prohibited (only use glue trap). The important thing are building condition to avoid pest infiltration and surely keep the environment clean

Rgds

Avila


Edited by avila muncar, 05 May 2014 - 04:47 AM.

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#5 Margaux

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 08:34 AM

Yes, I would agree on the recommendation to increase your response with pesticide if sanitation did not work.

As for is it prohibited?  Well, by who?  For what?

 

Hi,

 

That exactly my follow up question, who prohibits the use of pesticide application in a food manufacturing? Technically, No one. Right?

 

 

Ann,

Inside production area at my plant, we use pyrethroid group for fogging (dosage and procedure of application as directed), chemical rodent bait and electric flies killer are prohibited (only use glue trap). The important thing are building condition to avoid pest infiltration and surely keep the environment clean

Rgds

Avila

 

Hi Avila,

 

I agree with you.

 

With regards to use of pesticides, pyrethroids/-thrin chemicals are more preferred because it is derived from a botanical insecticide, so it can easily degraded in the environment. Here in our country,  aside from choosing pyrethroids, we also select chemicals to be used according to its toxicity level (as per indicated by the color bands) as well as the chemical properties such as residual effect, fast knowckdown etc.

 

Do you consider those also? Because pyrethroids could be at high toxicity level (yellow, blue) and low ( green)?

 

Thanks.


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#6 Margaux

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 09:29 AM

In addition, requiring this so for identifying or eliminating potential hazards of pesticide contamination on food products.


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#7 fgjuadi

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 11:41 AM

Hi,

 

That exactly my follow up question, who prohibits the use of pesticide application in a food manufacturing? Technically, No one. Right?

 

Sorry -to be clear, I meant a lot of people control pesticides and prohibit certain pesticides, although pesticide use is a last resort tool in IPM, behind sanitation and hygienic design of equipment, removing entry points in the facility, removing the infestation itself (is it in a bag of R&D ingredients?), monitoring the pests to see where your problems are, etc. 

 

No pesticide should be in the production area during production.  You can apply when the factory is down, but you have to be careful to use the right amount of the right pesticide & clean afterward.  You have to control pesticide use in a food facility.  There are pesticides designed for food facilities and strict regulation in the US by the EPA & the individual state; I don't know what the regulatory rules are in the Philippines.  If you're working to an organic standard, your certifying body will prohibit some treatments and allow others.  AIB has good standards for pest control in a factory.  For chemical safety, pesticides are generally not stored on site.  The 3rd party will generally be able to provide a list of pesticides which the QA or Plant Manger will approve or deny based on food safety.


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#8 Margaux

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 12:56 PM

Hi Magenta,

Thank you for the clarification. I already listed your points.Anyway, we do the same here for our compliance to the food manufacturer. We also comply AIB standards and even recommending it to handled food mfg plants to follow AiB standards. :)

In case of manufacturers with high standards on sanitation ex. Pharmaceuticals, would you still allow once a year treatment based on the number of pest sightings?

Thanks again.


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#9 Charles.C

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 04:18 PM

Dear Margaux,

 

With respect to yr post #5, I think you may find that some factories will totally prohibit some pesticides within the production area. Notably rodenticides. Similar to magenta_m's comments.

 

In respect to global regulatory guidelines, I think you can find a spectrum of opinions. i have attached a few below.

Attached File  pe1 - Use of rodenticides (1999).pdf   27.53KB   50 downloads

Attached File  pe2 - NPMA,pest management standards for food plants, 2013.pdf   185.77KB   69 downloads

Attached File  pe3 - CFIA, General Principles of Food Hygiene, Composition and Labelling , prob. current.pdf   196.93KB   69 downloads

Attached File  pe4 - CIEH - Pest Control Procedures in the Food Industry, 2009.pdf   1.46MB   74 downloads

 

pe1 is an old (1999) summary of the US scenario but may not be so different to that in current use, eg perhaps pe2.

A Canadian, seemingly ultra-prohibitive viewpoint is available in pe3 (eg see 4.2.1) and a UK assessment in pe4, the latter seeming  slightly more tolerant (eg sec.12.3) (the 2-3 UK pest specialists on this forum are welcome to correct me if they see this post :smile: )

 

Personally I have never used rodenticides in the production area but pyrethroids yes (via pest contractor). I don't dispute that the unfortunate scenario in yr OP is impossible but it may well be that other factors are/were also involved.?

 

Rgds / Charles.C

 

PS- I'm not familiar with yr Green Label (or any other colours for that matter). Maybe you could elaborate a little. Green = ecological ?, If so  = ?


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#10 Avila

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 04:08 AM

Hi,

 

That exactly my follow up question, who prohibits the use of pesticide application in a food manufacturing? Technically, No one. Right?

 

 

 

Hi Avila,

 

I agree with you.

 

With regards to use of pesticides, pyrethroids/-thrin chemicals are more preferred because it is derived from a botanical insecticide, so it can easily degraded in the environment. Here in our country,  aside from choosing pyrethroids, we also select chemicals to be used according to its toxicity level (as per indicated by the color bands) as well as the chemical properties such as residual effect, fast knowckdown etc.

 

Do you consider those also? Because pyrethroids could be at high toxicity level (yellow, blue) and low ( green)?

 

Thanks.

Dear Ann,

Our pest control contractor has a list of permitted pyrethroid chemicals (based on government regulation) that used in our facility. During external audit/inspection by customers, FDA, BRC-certification body, local food and drug agency, they always ask the list of pesticides used and method of application.

Rgds,

Avila


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#11 Margaux

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 06:39 AM

Dear Charles.

 

I really appreciate your reply with very useful references. I am aware of rodenticide use and I agree that this should not be present indoors, whether in food mfg or not, since rodents and humans are mammals the effect of rodenticides could be the same to humans. AIB has the same standards regarding this.

 

--

 

Pesticides are being categorized according to Toxicity level (LD 50 - rat, mg/kg). Aside from the toxicity level indicated by the warning signs and hazard symbols (ie. DANGER, CAUTION, HARMFUL etc.)  in the label, these signs are also incorporated with the color bands...

 

RED = Class Ia & Ib, Extremely Hazardous, Very Toxic (Skull)

YELLOW = Class II, Moderately Hazardous, HARMFUL

BLUE = Class III, Slightly hazardous, Caution

GREEN = Class IV, relatively non toxic or least hazardous

 

FAO, USAID comply this from WHO classification of  hazard of the formulation.

 

Some reference:

 

http://www.fao.org/f...lines/label.pdf

http://www.fintrac.c...color bands.PDF

 

 

Based on my encounter on pesticide use, pyrethroids  being used in food mfg are usually categorized under Class IV or that have Green Color bands, although, there are some  non pyrethroid formulations that are Green labeled. As a pest expert, I would consider these to prevent pest resistance to pyrethroid chemicals. So, would this be a valid reason to use non-pyrethroid, but green labeled pesticides inside the manufacturing area??

 

Thanks,

 

Margaux


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#12 Charles.C

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 10:22 AM

Dear Margaux,

 

Thanks for the info/links. I subsequently did a little net searching. A few comments –

 

It is possible the fao document (1995) is now obsolete. Maybe see the download at this link –

http://www.who.int/i...ides_hazard/en/

(the low hazardous end  has apparently been expanded plus other revisions. Please also note the lengthy list of  caveats given in the text  as to the usage/interpretation of  related data).

 

I am unsure as to the age/source/interpretation of the USAID document which appears undated/unreferenced ?.

 

Other colour schemes also seem to exist  based on variations of the WHO gradings, eg –

http://en.wikipedia..../Toxicity_label

(again note the various, slightly alarming, caveats included)

 

Whether any of the above grading-type schemes have been officially accepted (anywhere) within the food manufacturing industry I don’t know (perhaps you do ?). Personally I have not yet seen any mention of such  but I make no claims to being a pest control expert.  Presumably a  reputable contracted pest control service will know.(?) I typically request copies of safety data sheets/official food facility usage approval for the chemicals used by the Service Company. The auditor typically does likewise. :smile:

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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