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How do you define a "small" accident?


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#1 ksullivan

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 06:33 PM

Good Afternoon,

 

It's been a while since we looked at our procedure for clean-up following an accident involving blood/human tissue (fortunately we haven't needed it!).  Serious accidents are extremely rare, but what about the occasional cut finger (that just needs a band-aid)?  What constitutes a "small" accident?

 

A bit about our facility ('cause this always seems to get asked...): food manufacturing, low risk products, not GFSI-certified.  So, I'm not trying to comply with a standard, just trying to do the right thing.

 

Theories are great but actual situations are really instructive!  Many thanks for your input!  


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#2 Setanta

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 06:47 PM

As a QA Manager and a member of our on-site First Aid Team, I would say this.

 

Anything that injures someone to the point of bleeding, should be cleaned and sanitized. Any blood should be cleaned up (don't forget the floor) using a bleach and water mix. Now, it doesn't have to be the whole piece of equipment, just the spot that caused the injury.

 

Make sure your cleaning people wear gloves--it would be ideal if they had first aid training also--so they understood about bloodborne pathogens. The gloves should be thown away immediately, preferably in biohazard bag.  The bags are available from most supply companies like Grainger. The incident, no matter how small, should be documented for possible Worker's Comp issues.

 

I'm sure there are other things to remember. Get the injured person off the production floor ASAP.  We had one person cut a finger (fairly MINOR cut) but they waved their hand around, sprinkling blood everywhere.  SO unnecessary!

 

EDITED to add anything that breaks the skin, even if no blood is drawn, should be documented and an inspection of the equipment also done and documented.


Edited by Setanta, 10 September 2014 - 06:49 PM.

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#3 Mike Green

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 07:32 PM

Good Afternoon,

 

It's been a while since we looked at our procedure for clean-up following an accident involving blood/human tissue (fortunately we haven't needed it!).  Serious accidents are extremely rare, but what about the occasional cut finger (that just needs a band-aid)?  What constitutes a "small" accident?

 

A bit about our facility ('cause this always seems to get asked...): food manufacturing, low risk products, not GFSI-certified.  So, I'm not trying to comply with a standard, just trying to do the right thing.

 

Theories are great but actual situations are really instructive!  Many thanks for your input!  

 

 IMO  a small accident = one that can be dealt with effectively by in-house first aiders vs calling emergency services or going to hospital

 

 a small blood (or any body fluid!) spillage = one that is  mangeable/cleanable in a reasonable timescale using the readily available equipment.(eg body fluid spillage kit)

 

-not sure 'small' is a really good definition for spillages as it's 'cleanability' kind of also depends where the spillage is (eg  warehouse, food production area, open floor, hard flooring, carpet,into machinery etc)

 

 I have seen various definitions of small, from  a certain 'number of spots of blood',  to 10cm or 20cm  diameter 'pool'

 

When I worked in the Hospital , what we would define as a small spillage would probably close a food production facility down!

 

 IMO 'controllable' is probably a better defintion for spills

 

Kind Regards

Mike


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I may sound like a complete idiot...but actually there are a couple of bits missing

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#4 fgjuadi

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 08:12 PM

We use blood borne pathogen kits - for any amount of blood.  QA signs off on cleaning / product that may have been affected - so let's say someone gets a paper cut -

they have to report for HSE (Health, Safety, Environmental) anyway.  When they come report it I assess the line.  If there's blood on the line/floor/anywhere, we need the blood borne pathogen kit.  It comes with bio bags, gloves, and absorbing powder (I think it's baking soda!) , etc .

 

  Then I say something like "The product on the conveyor is waste now" or "Shut 'er down, it's gonna take a full sanitation to clean up this bad boy, call in the spill team!"  (Ed note: I never, ever get to say 'Shut 'er down, but I do get to occasionally say 'this bad boy', which I like to do).   In my SOP I leave disposition of product to QA on staff, but it is very clear that if there is *any* blood to clean, someone trained needs to clean, and someone from QA needs to approve running product.  Because blood carries a lot of...stuff...in it. 


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#5 Mulan1010

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 11:19 PM

First I want to say that it is wonderful that you are looking into this because it is the right thing to do.  KUDOS TO YOU!!!

 

I agree with magenta_majors said.  I also recommend you type up a procedure to follow, put it on laminated business cards for easy accessibility and then train your management team on procedures.  It is so much better to be prepared for something than not. 

 

There is a lot of information available but some possible procedures might go something like: 1) Immediately stop production and traffic in the area, notify supervisor and QA and assess situation. 2) Any employees addressing issue is to don proper PPE (for their own protection).  3) Tend to the injured person(s) and if it is safe, remove from production area - employee safety and health comes first 4) Retain area and/or equipment as needed 5) All surfaces affected will be properly disinfected (this is the procedure you get from sanitation supply company) and then cleaned as soon as possible.  6)  All materials with a sharp edge will be cleaned with equipment designed for purpose (brush and dust pan, vacuum, tweezers, etc...) and disposed of in a puncture proof container labeled for biohazard 7) Potentially contaminated wastes will be disposed of in a Bio-hazard bag, which will be disposed of per regulation.  8) Potentially contaminated laundry items will be placed in a Bio-hazard labeled / color coded plastic bag for transportation to cleaners.  9) Any product that was possibly affected must be placed on hold or disposed of immediately.  - Exception: Our health care regulations allow for items related to vomit to be double bagged and thrown in trash.

 

It really is important for employees to be trained on bloodborne pathogens and the necessary precautions to take in order to protect themselves when exposed to a situation and any bodily fluid exposure, no matter how small, is exposure.


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#6 Snookie

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Posted 17 September 2014 - 11:43 PM

  Then I say something like "The product on the conveyor is waste now" or "Shut 'er down, it's gonna take a full sanitation to clean up this bad boy, call in the spill team!"  (Ed note: I never, ever get to say 'Shut 'er down, but I do get to occasionally say 'this bad boy', which I like to do).   In my SOP I leave disposition of product to QA on staff, but it is very clear that if there is *any* blood to clean, someone trained needs to clean, and someone from QA needs to approve running product.  Because blood carries a lot of...stuff...in it. 

 

Worked in a plant where we had a "small" dismemberment,  We were shut down for about three hours while everything was cleaned, sanitized and then inspected.    In the end, hospital was able to put most of the cuts together and employee lost a very small portion of fingertip (was amazing how much blood we had over these two fingers but employee ran through the building to another area to get help.  Building looked like a Hollywood slasher movie set).  Was very proud of how calm everyone stayed so that all the right decisions were made it was handled in a orderly manner.    I didn't get to say "shut 'er down" either.  Everyone knew we were.  Was not my favorite day. 


Edited by Snookie, 17 September 2014 - 11:47 PM.

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#7 DeeTeeQA

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 05:25 PM

I was just reading through all these posts and they are all very helpful.  I just have a question about the training for Blood borne Pathogens.  Can training be in-house or do we need to have certified trainers for that purpose?  Could two of our employees watch a training video and read the procedures from the CDC or other organization and go with that?

 

We could then verify the training and have two authorized personnel that are able to clean up bodily fluids. 

 

We are a flexible packaging manufacturer.  I have not had to deal with any bodily fluid clean-up nor has the current janitor.  But having authorized personnel to clean up and sanitize/disinfect area and equipment makes sense. 

 

If any one has any ideas or has been in this situation, please let me know. 

 

Thank you,

Nita


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#8 mgourley

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Posted 22 October 2015 - 05:59 PM

Training can be done in house via the training video of your choice.

 

Marshall


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