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Supplier Approval and Traceability of Packaging

Packaging Supplier Approval Traceability

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#1 SaltSafety

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 06:27 PM

The standard states that supplier approval must include raw materials and packaging, but how far does that go with packaging?

Do the approval procedures have to assess cases that cans are placed in, plastic covers that go over cases, labels, pallets, etc., or does this just apply to food contact packaging?

If it does apply to non food contact packaging, then do we have to apply all the requirements for traceability to suppliers of these materials also? Yikes!


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#2 Simon

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Posted 28 January 2015 - 06:54 PM

The standard states that supplier approval must include raw materials and packaging, but how far does that go with packaging?

Do the approval procedures have to assess cases that cans are placed in, plastic covers that go over cases, labels, pallets, etc., or does this just apply to food contact packaging?

If it does apply to non food contact packaging, then do we have to apply all the requirements for traceability to suppliers of these materials also? Yikes!

 

Hello SaltSafety, it's about having appropriate controls in place for the level of risk the packaging presents to your products...so yes another risk assessment. :rolleyes:

 

So cans are your primary food contact packaging and are high risk as they in direct contact with product and as such you would expect them to be treated as any other ingredient with all supplier quality assurance data, specifications, certificates of analysis, migration reports, certificates of conformity etc. available.  Traceability a must.

 

Secondary packaging that does not directly touch the food product, but may do so indirectly and will directly contact the cans then that would be medium risk and you would still expect approved suppliers, specifications and some hygienic manufacturing conditions.  Not always easy as often these manufacturers make for all industries and food may only be a small part.  Traceability a nice to have.

 

Then there would be tertiary packaging such as transit packaging, pallets, labels etc. which would be low risk.  Again it would be useful to have approved suppliers and specifications. Traceability not required.

 

Sit down with your list of packaging and put them into one of the groups and fill in the gaps.

 

The above is a general idea for starters.

 

Hope it helps.


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Simon Timperley
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