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The Significance of Food Fraud

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#1 Simon

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Posted 27 February 2015 - 07:56 PM

The Significance of Food Fraud: A Global Account from an Australian Perspective
Janine Curl, Food Labelling Regulatory Compliance Consultant, Food Labelling Matters

This Live Webinar is taking place: March 06, 2015 - 03:00 PM - 04:00 PM GMT (10 a.m. EST Start)

International research and initiatives are defining the public health risk of food fraud and identifying methods for control. This webinar will provide an overview of the developing concept of 'food fraud' internationally and provide examples of Australian food fraud matters considered by state and national regulators. 

 


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Simon Timperley
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#2 Simon

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 08:08 PM

Topic related comments and questions captured from today's webinar.

 

Paul Kuma

What distributors have to do is to "qualify" their suppliers, and have confidence in their products

 

Sakshi

how do we identify origin except from replying on supplier?

  

Sakshi

We process cheese. we have several very small scale manufacturers. for BRC, would we need them to test for melamine, lets say, regularly?

  

Theophilus Fon Anyam

Is it really possible for a distributor to test all the products to ensure compliance? We request letters of guarantees, specifications, allergen declarations and label verification. I find it cumbersome to test all products for their composition and percentages of ingredients.

  

Yolande Pretorius

Media plays a big roll in educating consumers to watch out for food fraud

 

Paul Kuma

From all indications, there are as many food fraud cases, but very few end up traced as a cause for product recall. How can regulatory bodies step up strategies to identify food fraud cases?

 

Leila Burin

There is a good explanation in the brc participate, about understanding vulnerability assessment expected as per BRC, V7

 

Evangelos

My view is that food fraud should be analyzed/included in HACCP programs. What 's yours?

 

Martha G

Is there any new update you can provide from the recent GFSI conference in regards to Food Fraud? e.g. is ready the vulnerability assessment best practice to share globally? Thanks

 

Dora

Should food fraud be analyzed/included in HACCP programs?

 

Sakshi

Seen a processed cheese with most info in non-english but still the label had cheddar highlighted as a bold big word and rest was almost unreadable!

 

Kirsten

We buy in manufactured ingredients (chocolate) -- We've sent it out for identification testing - but it is very difficult for a lab to analyze complex ingredients. How much should we push our suppliers to provide information about the raw ingredient qualification and testing process, especially with vendors we've been dealing with for many years?

  

Meenakshi Gaheer

Just wondering how much info is required to update HACCP plan hazard/risk assessment

  

PILAR

I have read of an initiative known as Operation Opson where almost 50 countries are participating. What do you know about ir and how a country can be part of it.? Thank you

  

Kelly Woods

If you find or suspect food fraud for a product or material, who is the reporting body and should there be a documented procedure for reporting? 

 

Kathryn

Is this going to be too big of a fast step to set in place considering where we at now?

  

Meenakshi Gaheer

Under which hazard category would you classify food fraud - Biological, Chemical or physical hazard?

  

Yolande Pretorius

Should chocolate factories test for melamine if they use powder milk?


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Best Regards,

Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
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Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


1. No spam, profanity, pornography, trolling or personal attacks

2. Topics and posts should be “on topic” and related to site content
3. No (unpaid) advertising
4. You may have one account on the board at any one time
5. Enjoy your stay!


#3 shea quay

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 02:31 AM

Wish I had made this webinar. Some excellent points made. If I can add my two cents worth; 

Meenakshi Gaheer - there is a fourth dimension called "intrinsic". Food fraud can fall under this. Other things such as legal limits for additives or preservatives can also fall under this risk. 

Kirsten - the fact that you have sent it for testing will help you from a food safety perspective. Realistically there is very little risk. 

Kathryn - Yes. 

Kelly - Your first point of contact is your managing director. They will explain all, or they will nod and promise to do something about it. Either way, ensure you have a paper trail for legal reasons, e.g. email etc. 

Sakski - the FIR regulations were the first change to European labelling regulations for 30 years. There are still companies operating that have not complied to the previous legislation. If this were something the Daily Mail were interested in, products would be pulled from the shelves, but media and auditors are only worried about things that make the food industry look bad, rather than good. If the item you are referring to was manufactured by monogamous muslim same sex lovers, then it may be an issue as the Mail would make it one, but as it is only foodlaw being broken to an extent that only people with food allergens are concerned, no-one outside the food industry really gives a damn. Yes, it is depressing. 

Pilar - it's not a legal requirement. It does not concern us. 

Dora - yes. There are four pillars to a proper food safety system - microbiological, chemical, physical and intrinsic. Allergens and food fraud fall under intrinsic. These are the risks. We deal with them. 

Martha G - no. You can borrow ideas but you can't borrow situations. 

Paul Kuma - shit does happen - apologies for my comment, but it really, really does. There are times that the situations are out of control even with the greatest of quality managers. I should know. I'm freaking amazing at my job, yet still, shit does happen!

 

Bottom line - the food ingredients industry is world wide. If your company is to be affected by an incident, then chances are your competitor is also going to be. Insurance is, rather sadly, going to be your close out, as your Company is not going to court relying on your ability as a Quality Manager versus a 15,000 legal fee. The fraud is not going to occur on our level - the fraud will occur on a pay grade above ours. We will not have the facts to deal with it at our level, with our BRC compliant but legally un-compliant questionnaires. New Quality Managers take note, legal knowledge is far more important than technical knowledge in our world now. "Food Law" and "BRC approved" isn't worth the paper it's written on. 


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 05:58 AM

Dear Janine/Simon,

 

IMO a fascinating webinar, and much more than an overview. Delivered with impressive clarity/authority. :thumbup:

 

I was rather taken aback by the range of proven incidents already well documented. I guess, as per usual,  Preventive Strategies are 2 a penny, Implementation is something else.

 

The "Food Protection" matrix shown in the webinar was a notable viewpoint of the inter-relationships between the terminologies Fraud/FS/Food Defense.  However it seemed to me that the concept of conveniently separating intentional vs unintentional motivations is apt to be interpreted as a partial excuse for "Fraud" but where "collateral", FS-related, damage "unfortunately" occurs, eg melamine. Maybe another matrix element is required to be included -  criminality.

 

Rgds / Charles.C


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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