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Requirements for non-direct food contact corrugated cartons

Corrugated Secondary requirements hazards

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#1 elihaj

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 09:54 PM

Hello
 
We are working on establishing a FSMS (ISO 22000 based). we aim to produce corrugated packaging for food (indirect - secondary packaging) and some of our items are litho-laminated. Would appreciate much assistance for the following:
- Should we have microbiological concerns in the case of our products?
- Are there special considerations for the lamination glue or any grade can be used? Is flexographic ink a concern for a secondary packaging?
- What about printing houses that supply us the offset printed sheets that we laminate?
- Other hazards to consider for HACCP?
- what is the critical RH for storage and processing that could affect food safety of our prodcuts?
- Is normal air ventilation with dust filters sufficient, or should we consider a more sophisticated system to control moisture and temperature?
 
 
Thanks,
Elie


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#2 Simon

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 11:34 AM

Hi Elie,

 

In order to provide you with a useful response it would be helpful if you could tell us what your packaging products are and the different ways they are used by your customers.

 

Regards,

 

Simon


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#3 elihaj

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Posted 20 June 2015 - 07:52 AM

Our packaging is designed to contain food material that may not be fully wrapped in a primary packaging, and is separated from our boxes by at least a liner, platic, tray, etc..

As examples: Cake box - sushi box (food placed in plastic tray on the box) - pizza box (liner between pizza and box) - croissant tray...

 

we sell and promote them as not to be contacting food. Our clients use different types of barriers/separators.


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#4 Simon

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 11:13 AM

If there is a possibility for direct food contact due to the configuration of the entire packaging product then it is direct food contact packaging.  You will have to determine in conjunction with customer if it is or it isn't.

 

If it is not direct contact then there are almost zero micro concerns (for direct food contact there is very low concern).  You should seek guidance from your ink and adhesive supplier to see what the specification is and for what use they recommend (at least suitable for secondary packaging).  What kind of ink system do you use solvent, water, UV?  And again find out the same information from your suppliers of offset printed sheets that you laminate.

 

The main hazards would be physical and some chemical like oils and lubricants that should be controlled by your factory and personnel hygiene standards.  Also good printing control to ensure no missing print or wrong print, mixing designs etc. especially if on ingredients (think allergens).

 

Storage should just be clean and dry, I don't think temperature control necessary for food safety, although extremes may effect product quality.

 

Again air quality should be fine with closed doors and normal dust filtering ventilation. You should conduct air sampling maybe 2 or 4 times a year via settle plates for TVC, yeasts and molds,  Not expensive and validates your air quality.

 

Cheers,

Simon


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Simon Timperley
IFSQN Administrator
 
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Need food safety advice?
Relax, you've come to the right place…

The IFSQN is a helpful network of volunteers providing answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts on food safety management systems and a wide range of food safety topics.

 
We could make a huge list of rules, terms and conditions, but you probably wouldn’t read them.

All that we ask is that you observe the following:


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