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#1 792404

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 12:45 PM

I did online AIB courses and all the traceability lessons didnt really explain how to set up creating lot numbers. We make batches of confectionary product every day and I need to figure if I need batch and lot numbers or just one? Anyone have any info on how to set this up? , Thanks, Mike


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#2 mgourley

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 01:24 PM

That can be as easy or complex as you want it to be.

Bottom line is you need something that can be traced.

 

The most simple way is to use a julian date.

Let's say you have three lines and three shifts.

12815A1 would denote product produced on line A, first shift on May 7th 2015.

 

If you already have product codes, those could be added as well to tighten up the specificity.

i.e. 12815A11234

 

Marshall


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#3 792404

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 07:24 PM

Thanks Marshall, we have one line and one shift. Right now we are just printing and tracing from a best by date. Every best by date is linked to all the ingredient lot codes. Do you think we need to change to Lot Numbers?


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#4 Slab

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 09:15 PM

I would like to add to Marshall's advice that with lot/batch methodology financial liability should also be considered for trace back. The smaller the better when it comes to the "bean counters"!  ;)

 

Thanks Marshall, we have one line and one shift. Right now we are just printing and tracing from a best by date. Every best by date is linked to all the ingredient lot codes. Do you think we need to change to Lot Numbers?

 

 

Numbering is arbitrary. What is not is the method you use to prove trace back of all inputs. If your current system works then why change?


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#5 792404

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Posted 09 August 2015 - 11:46 PM

Well, Honestly I am not sure if what we do now is correct. Mostly, I dont know all the rules on what needs to happen. For instance, If we run out of an ingredient in the middle of a batch and need to open a new lot of ingredient, how do we handle that? As of now, it is the same Best By date so I dont think that is right. I think that is where I get confused. I understand to keep track of what ingredients are in the batch so we can trace back in case of a problem, but My example above is one when I am not sure how to handle it.

Mike


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#6 mgourley

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 08:48 AM

Taking your hypothetical, let's walk through the "what if".

Let's say you indeed end up using two different lots of an ingredient for your production on that day.

Let's say the second lot of ingredient ends up being recalled by the manufacturer.

As part of your traceability, you would find out that you started using the second lot of ingredient at XX time on YY date.

This would then point you to your Best By date. Assuming you time code your products, it would also get you to the "smaller the better" scenario when you have to withdraw product from market.

 

Slab is correct. numbering is arbitrary. There is no "better" or "best" practice for lot numbers/batch codes. Use whatever is most simple and allows you to identify all materials used in the production of the product.

 

Marshall


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#7 saucy

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 03:26 PM

In our operation, we have different products with different shelf life. Also, not all of our customers require a "Best By" date. So we use Julian date of manufacture to trace. All products are required as a minimum to have this as the finished goods trace ID.

 

In our finished goods specs, we note the shelf life duration so that if we were to recall, we could determine by either Best By or Julian.

 

It is important also to know how your suppliers trace. Stating "LOT#" clearly on the ingredients is not always the case. We have a book at receiving department with illustrations of ingredient labels and which numbers represent the vendor's trace ID.


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 04:32 PM

It would appear this thread is basically revolving around the interpretation of a batch (aka lot) as per this thread -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ion/#entry91950

 

@792404 - as per yr post 5 the traceability problem is simply that if it was later discovered that something was wrong with the one ingredient which was eventually changed, you would unnecessarily have to reject a load of product which did not have it in anyway.

 

Hence the need to have some system of batch/lot numbers.


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Kind Regards,

 

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#9 792404

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Posted 10 August 2015 - 11:55 PM

Thanks for taking the time to help me out everyone.


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#10 Tony-C

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Posted 11 August 2015 - 04:41 AM

Here is an example of a simple system for creating batch/lot numbers I might add two digits for the year if long life products.

 

Attached File  Section 7.9 Product Identification and Traceability System - Appendix_001.jpg   107.42KB   4 downloads

 

Regards,

 

Tony


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#11 Esther

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 08:40 AM

Very interesting topic indeed.

 

IMO, Mgourley is totally right when he said “That can be as easy or complex as you want it to be” it depends on, basically, how much money are you to prepared to lose or the level of complexity you can manage in your factory according to data recording.

 

All the inputs from the members are right ; howewer I would always take a deep thinking about MY factory and the reality of my production. There is not a right answer.

 

Regarding the theatrical scenario, 792404’s concern, I do not see any problem as long as your system is loading with data according to new added products ( different lots )  during production ( not only at start).

 

Going back to previous topics related to this traceability issue : ¿ one week seems extremely long? Again, depends on the situation. For instance, let’s think on an agricultural seasonal product. Let`s imagine all your providers are small size, this is, you will receive small batches/lots of many providers. In this case the lot of your raw material will be “ the year of harvest”.

 

Another example, let’s think of those huge silos containing powder or liquid food products.

 

Somebody during the discussion referred to “production date” as an option to set the lot code. Well, let’s think on a product whose production is taken 2 days ¿ what production date to choose? Again, it is worthy a deep thinking. As an alternative we can use the packing date.

 

And so on.

 

I must confess I was very surprised when I read the quote posted by Charles C. related to FDA. Thanks so much Charles C. I will take a look to that. I am not familiar with USA legislation ¿ is that compulsory or it is just a recommendation?

 

Esther


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#12 Charles.C

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Posted 12 August 2015 - 11:22 PM

Hi Esther,

 

Unfortunately I'm not in USA either so i can only quote.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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