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Dry Processing Operation Cleaning Schedule

Bakery Confectionery Master Cleaning Schedule

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#1 AJ1795

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:09 PM

Hi All,

 

We run a confectionery operation where the entire second half of the process is a dry operation (extrusion into a starch bed, etc.).  My question to you all is how often, if ever, these areas should be wet cleaned/sanitized.  Currently, they are dusted off but that's about it.  Getting any of that equipment wet will increase, rather than decrease, the risk of microbial contamination but it feels odd to never "clean" all of those conveyors, etc.  Opinions from others with dry processes would be very much appreciated!  


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#2 Dr Vu

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 11:50 AM

do you have allergen  risks?


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A vu in time , saves nine

#3 AJ1795

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 01:40 PM

do you have allergen  risks?

 

 

Nope! Designated line for a single product. 


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#4 amppyr

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Posted 03 September 2015 - 09:09 PM

Hi,

 

I worked in a food storage facility the stored finished product in finished packaging and repackaged product into secondary packaging. There was never any exposed product in the process, other than waste (damages).

During the SQF certification audit we were required to have an approved food grade sanitizer and SSOPs.

 

I would sanitize according to a set schedule (Cleaning schedule). Define the responsibility for cleaning (Cleaner), and maintain a monitoring record that indicates monitoring has been completed according to procedure. You should have all the necessary equipment for cleaning, measuring and PPE. Most sanitizers can be "air-dried" if you use them according to regulation (e.g. the sanitizer does not require a potable water rinse).

 

Provide training on mixing instructions, which should be documented in the SSOPs. Don't forget to keep it in a safe place and note it in your chemical control program.

 

You should be cleaning the waste and sanitizing afterwards and of course verification of sanitizer effectiveness is a requirement.

 

However, it is probably not a regulatory requirement, as one reason we had to have a sanitation program is because we had an ambient meat product that required us to be a registered facility.

 

Also SQF standard goes beyond regulatory requirements.

 

Thanks.

 


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