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How to conclude temperature deviation impact product integrity

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#1 Baskaran Gangadharan

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:17 PM

Hi, 

 

Need technical advice on the following incident: Your help highly appreciated. 

 

We received an in-transit temperature report ( data logger) of a  frozen consignment from my service provider. During the course of journey ,we found 8 -9 hours deviation in the ranges of -8 to -1 degree celsius. 

 

But, when we physically inspect the temperature of  the product found -16.1 Degree Celsius. 

 

Deviation during journey might left any impact on the produc .  If  yes, what are the possible impact  ( texture, taste, safety, and etc., )  

 

 

Regards,

Baskaran.G.


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#2 brianweber

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:54 PM

What is the product?


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#3 Baskaran Gangadharan

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:56 PM

Frozen Poultry . 


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#4 brianweber

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 12:56 PM

It was never thawed so i don't see any food safety issues. As far as texture, if it was in a solid form and frozen the whole time I can't see how that would be affected.


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#5 Baskaran Gangadharan

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 01:13 PM

Thanks Brian. 

 

In the interest of understanding - in transit temperature and requirement 

 

How one can conclude the product integrity  based on the in-transit temperature report. Because, I was under understanding that  frozen product need to be stored and transported at -18 Degree Celsius or colder.  Having said that  there could be accommodation of temperature deviation for   3- 4 hr.  Because,  it might not leave huge impact on the product.

 

Pls correct me if my understanding is wrong and help me in providing any documents or reference on the subject line.

 

Regards,

Baskaran.G. 


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#6 onsolution

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Posted 06 October 2015 - 10:17 PM

Are you saying that when you received the item it was at -16°C but the service provider notified you that there freezer had actually risen to -1°?

 

You need to see the actual log to work out how long it spent above -10°C and more importantly at the warmer end. That will give a better indication of how likely it is for the product to have changed. Temperature loggers monitoring air temperature will respond to temperature change much faster than if it was surrounded by product. If the time at -1° is relatively short then the product will not have had time to change.

Chances are the bulk of your product was not impacted. The product on the surface will have been impacted. You may have found a different result for the surface temperature (which should be back down to the -15° range) and the internal temperature of the chickens closest to the surface. If, however, the freezer had been operating correctly again then it will also be -15° again.

 

The biggest risk you have is an impact on the quality of the product. You may have thawed and refrozen part of the product. I know other products are sensitive to this, but I don't know about chicken. It is still well below 5°C and so bacterial growth isn't a factor.

If you want to run independent monitoring of your own, select a temperature logger that is small enough to fit just inside your product or one with an external probe. This will give a better representation of what is happening.

 

Cheers,

Shane


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For inexpensive temperature loggers.

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#7 Baskaran Gangadharan

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 02:13 AM

Thanks a lot  Shane for your detailed explanation. 

 

Correct. We received product at -16 Degree Celsius. But, data logger report recorded temperature  in ranges of -1 to -8 degree celsius for the period of 8-9 hrs. 

 

As you suggested, we placed a data logger at hot spot of a vehicle to record  in-transit temperature. Even on that, we observed the similar reading as mentioned above ( i.e 8 hrs in the ranges of -8 Degree Celsius).

 

Rightly said,  I am sure that product safety might not have impact due to the said chage .  Having said that I feel it certainly impact the product quality. 

 

Because, the product might thawed and refrozen due fluctuation in temperature , which eventually cause huge ice crystal formation  in product and  impact product quality.

 

Since, studying and comparing  the trend of temperature deviation  and quality attribution of various product ( Fries, Ice cream, Brownies and patties). It will be greatfull to you if you can share with me reference articles or guidelines on the subject line . 

 

Regards,

Baskaran.G.


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 07 October 2015 - 05:08 AM

Hi, 

 

Need technical advice on the following incident: Your help highly appreciated. 

 

We received an in-transit temperature report ( data logger) of a  frozen consignment from my service provider. During the course of journey ,we found 8 -9 hours deviation in the ranges of -8 to -1 degree celsius. 

 

But, when we physically inspect the temperature of  the product found -16.1 Degree Celsius. 

 

Deviation during journey might left any impact on the produc .  If  yes, what are the possible impact  ( texture, taste, safety, and etc., )  

 

 

Regards,

Baskaran.G.

 

Hi Baskaran,

 

Some info. which may assist –

(1)

1. The temperature of quick-frozen foodstuffs must be stable and maintained, at all points in the product, at −18 ºC or lower, with possibly brief upward fluctuations of no more than 3 ºC during transport.
2. However, tolerances in the temperature of the product in accordance with good storage and distribution practice shall be permitted during local distribution and in retail display cabinets subject to the following conditions:
(a) these tolerances shall not exceed 3 ºC;
(b) they may, however reach 6 ºC in retail display cabinets, if and to the extent that the Member States so decide. In that case, the Member States shall select the temperature in the light of stock or product rotation in the retail trade. They shall inform the Commission of the measures taken and of the grounds for those measures.

(EC 1989)

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ods/#entry48191

 

 

(2)

Perishable or frozen materials meet specific minimum temperature requirements at points of shipment, transportation and receipt. It is recommended to observe the minimum temperature of -12°C as required for human food

(FEDIAF)(presumably "minimum" should be "maximum")

http://www.ifsqn.com...ods/#entry48191

 

(3)

The attachment in this post has substantial frozen transport information –

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...indpost&p=87631

 

 

One conclusion is obviously that the specific transporter's cooling capacity/construction was inadequate/faulty or someone left the doors open (assuming  precooling capability / product input temp. were OK ).

 

Personally I would suggest to  initially -

 

(a) Evaluate the appearance of received packed cargo (eg compared to known “good” product) for any visual evidence of damage due to thawing/refreezing.

(b) Evaluate OLQ / micro on a few samples and compare to spec./typical “good” data.

(c) Inspect the condition of transporter.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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