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Possible risks (if any) of using gas dryer


Best Answer Inverse, 09 May 2016 - 08:49 AM

Indirect drying will certainly reduce risks. Personally I'd only do some PAH testing initially to give you and your customers some confidence in the product you are drying. Depending on the outcome of the tests this will then guide you as to the frequency (if required) of further testing. Is PAH noted as an issue in dried seaweed? Do you customers require this test? If not then I'd possibly only test annually so if a customer asks you can have some results to show them and note that you do annual (or what ever frequency you decide) for monitoring purposes.

 

Thanks for a great suggestion!

Our consumers asked for PAH and dioxins, so I did more research and contacted lab to find out if we actually need to add these test to our routine testing regime.

 

Conclusion:

Dioxin/PCB is for monitoring drying process (historically due to drying with coal burning dryers has long caused dioxin contamination).

Whereas PAH's are really formed in incomplete combustion, which is linked to the smoking process. 

 

I think I will follow your suggestion and do some testing to identify levels and perform RA to find out the frequency of further testing.

 

Thank you!
 

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#1 Inverse

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 10:58 AM

Hi all,

 

I found this forum extremely useful with so many bright minds on board, so I thought maybe you could help me out to better understand possible risks (if any) of using gas dryer.

 

We are in the middle of buying gas dryer (which would be st.steel spinner, something like a big food safe washing machine) and I was wondering if there are any major issues related to this process? I'm concerned about health, safety, and possible contaminants (acrylamide, PAH-Polyaromic Hydrocarbons). Temperature limit: 190deg C , approximate drying time: 40min.

 

We would be using natural gas, the machine would be properly vented to outside air and other fire related issues addressed in risk assessment. 

Any kind of suggestion/opinion is well appreciated!

 

Thank you!

Inga


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#2 dr. Humaid Khan

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 09:13 PM

Hi Inverse

 

The use of gas dryers in the food industry is quite common. Lactose manufacturing industry has been using these dryers for decades. Pharmaceutical grade lactose also go through this process and still meet the pharmaceutical industry purity standard of 99.99% pure lactose. Therefore in my opinion there is no significant risk associated with using gas dryer

 

Kind regards

Dr. Humaid Khan

MD Halal International Services


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#3 liberator

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 08:54 PM

What are you drying and how is the heat applied to what you are drying? Is it direct(Gas flame heats air with direct contact which then goes straight into the dryer) indirect heat,Gas flame heats air thorough a radiator which is then used to do the drying.  Indirect heat is the preferred option. Direct heat can result in issues with fire/explosion, production of nitrates and other issues with by products of the gas burning process.


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#4 bbekbekk

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Posted 24 March 2016 - 12:00 AM

Tagging for info.


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#5 Inverse

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:36 AM

What are you drying and how is the heat applied to what you are drying? Is it direct(Gas flame heats air with direct contact which then goes straight into the dryer) indirect heat,Gas flame heats air thorough a radiator which is then used to do the drying.  Indirect heat is the preferred option. Direct heat can result in issues with fire/explosion, production of nitrates and other issues with by products of the gas burning process.

 

Hi,

 

We are drying seaweed, using indirect heat. I would guess it shouldn't cause any health/ safety risks? Also, would you still recommend testing for PAH?

 

Thank you!


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#6 liberator

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Posted 30 March 2016 - 09:18 PM

Indirect drying will certainly reduce risks. Personally I'd only do some PAH testing initially to give you and your customers some confidence in the product you are drying. Depending on the outcome of the tests this will then guide you as to the frequency (if required) of further testing. Is PAH noted as an issue in dried seaweed? Do you customers require this test? If not then I'd possibly only test annually so if a customer asks you can have some results to show them and note that you do annual (or what ever frequency you decide) for monitoring purposes.


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#7 Inverse

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Posted 09 May 2016 - 08:49 AM   Best Answer

Indirect drying will certainly reduce risks. Personally I'd only do some PAH testing initially to give you and your customers some confidence in the product you are drying. Depending on the outcome of the tests this will then guide you as to the frequency (if required) of further testing. Is PAH noted as an issue in dried seaweed? Do you customers require this test? If not then I'd possibly only test annually so if a customer asks you can have some results to show them and note that you do annual (or what ever frequency you decide) for monitoring purposes.

 

Thanks for a great suggestion!

Our consumers asked for PAH and dioxins, so I did more research and contacted lab to find out if we actually need to add these test to our routine testing regime.

 

Conclusion:

Dioxin/PCB is for monitoring drying process (historically due to drying with coal burning dryers has long caused dioxin contamination).

Whereas PAH's are really formed in incomplete combustion, which is linked to the smoking process. 

 

I think I will follow your suggestion and do some testing to identify levels and perform RA to find out the frequency of further testing.

 

Thank you!
 


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