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Bakery Product Flows for HACCP/HARPC

HACCP Food Safety Plan FMSA Product Flows bakery bread pastry

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#1 jpollock

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Posted 25 May 2016 - 03:25 PM

Happy Wednesday Folks,

 

If anyone would care to give me feedback on these product flow charts, it would be greatly appreciated.

 

We are in the process of formalizing our food safety plan to conform to the FSMA requirements.  We are a large artisan bakery (mixers, but no conveyers, everything hand shaped/finished) and are finding some challenges in guidelines that seem to be written for more industrial operations.

 

Thanks in advance for any feedback or advice,

 

Josh

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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 25 May 2016 - 04:26 PM

Happy Wednesday Folks,

 

If anyone would care to give me feedback on these product flow charts, it would be greatly appreciated.

 

We are in the process of formalizing our food safety plan to conform to the FSMA requirements.  We are a large artisan bakery (mixers, but no conveyers, everything hand shaped/finished) and are finding some challenges in guidelines that seem to be written for more industrial operations.

 

Thanks in advance for any feedback or advice,

 

Josh

 

Hi Josh,

 

IMEX, numbering the boxes is valuable for when you reach the hazard analysis (unless forbidden by FSMA).

 

It's also advisable to minimise the likelihood of the reader getting a headache following lines with no end/beginning  :smile:

 

i deduce "scale" means "weigh".

 

"Prepare Ingredients" seems to have a "Cook" step somewhere inside it ?.


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Charles.C


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#3 jpollock

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Posted 25 May 2016 - 04:34 PM

Hi Josh,

 

IMEX, numbering the boxes is valuable for when you reach the hazard analysis (unless forbidden by FSMA).

 

It's also advisable to minimise the likelihood of the reader getting a headache following lines with no end/beginning  :smile:

Thank you, Charles. Was waiting to number them until after I had fully vetted it so I wouldn't have to redo the down stream boxes if I added or deleted steps. Sorry about the line running off the page. It got cut off converting the Google document to a .pdf.  I'll make sure and check the final product before reposting!!

 

JCP


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#4 jpollock

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 07:50 PM

Thank you, Charles. Was waiting to number them until after I had fully vetted it so I wouldn't have to redo the down stream boxes if I added or deleted steps. Sorry about the line running off the page. It got cut off converting the Google document to a .pdf.  I'll make sure and check the final product before reposting!!

 

JCP

Also, "Scale" could also be "Weigh". "Prepare" in the bread flow does have a cook component.  I think I should probably break it out.  Will make it a little harder to read but it really is a distinct step with its own controls.  Thanks again.


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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 26 May 2016 - 08:47 PM

Hi jpollock,

 

I can add one more comment. Should add that i have no direct FSMA experience since not in USA.

 

Most of my own haccp plans have had relatively straight main lines albeit with some branches feeding in from the sides.

 

I found yr layout quite complex to follow due the several chunks of what are presumably alternative pathways, sometimes 2-way, occasionally 3-way. I deduce the grey-blue boxes are intended to assist this.

 

Personally I would have probably used colored arrows in some places to further assist although it may be less complex to those familiar with baking flows which I am not.

 

I suspect yr eventual hazard analysis is going to be fairly complex even with numbers to assist.

(Some authors handle such a  flowchart with a modular framework  so that alternative branches/loops are handled as separate chunks attached to a single main line. This may simplify the hazard analysis. Only a thought, if you have already done a “traditional”  haccp plan with this layout prior to FSMA likely  no problem for you at all)(or perhaps the FSMA guidelines you mention earlier are clear on such issues).

 

Otherwise the flowchart seems quite readable to me although i would probably slightly expand some of the text, eg "store" > "dry store/whatever". i was also surprised to not see any weighing steps near the end of the line.

 

PS - If no guideline flowcharts you might be interested to compare with the one in the seminar/example FSMA haccp plan previously posted here by Marshall (mgourley) although not for baking (fresh produce).


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#6 Leila Burin

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Posted 03 June 2016 - 05:59 PM

hello, what I find basic in bakery / bread is the storing of re-work (it use to be chill, and shelf life approx. 7 days - shall validate this).

Does it happen in your facility? This also shall be included in the diag flow,

best regards,

Leila


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#7 Aborel

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 04:50 PM

My input: I think the flow chart is difficult to read and if it were formed in a vertical flow with smaller boxes it could be simplified into one line.

 

My question is where are the CCPs?  I've been researching this myself for my product.  We make vegan products that are meat substitutes, but we classify them as Bakery, because there is no meat and they are baked products made mostly from gluten and tofu.  My understanding is that the bake step does not need to be a CCP if the product needs to exceed that to be made.

 

Ex.  If the product must reach 170F for food safety, but needs to reach 350F to be made, then the 170 is not needed as a CCP.

 

But how do we deal with the risk due to post-cook handling?  Do you have any CCPs in your process?

 

Also, I'm from Ann Arbor and happy so see a Zingerman's reference.  Makes me think of home.  Good products.


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#8 jpollock

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:06 PM

hello, what I find basic in bakery / bread is the storing of re-work (it use to be chill, and shelf life approx. 7 days - shall validate this).

Does it happen in your facility? This also shall be included in the diag flow,

best regards,

Leila

We do feed starters and that is in the flow but we we mix and bake to order daily, so there is no re-work.


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#9 jpollock

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 05:10 PM

My input: I think the flow chart is difficult to read and if it were formed in a vertical flow with smaller boxes it could be simplified into one line.

 

My question is where are the CCPs?  I've been researching this myself for my product.  We make vegan products that are meat substitutes, but we classify them as Bakery, because there is no meat and they are baked products made mostly from gluten and tofu.  My understanding is that the bake step does not need to be a CCP if the product needs to exceed that to be made.

 

Ex.  If the product must reach 170F for food safety, but needs to reach 350F to be made, then the 170 is not needed as a CCP.

 

But how do we deal with the risk due to post-cook handling?  Do you have any CCPs in your process?

 

Also, I'm from Ann Arbor and happy so see a Zingerman's reference.  Makes me think of home.  Good products.

I have since experimented with a vertical flow and it is a little easier to follow. Still not one line as we have some breads with ingredients that must be prepared separately before the mix and a combination of naturally leavened, partially yeasted and fully yeasted breads. In pastry it is even more confusing as we have packaged and unpackaged versions of the same items!

 

CCP will most likely be baking (yes, it may be redundant, but it is also and easy measure) and labelling, which will be an Allergen Control preventive control.

 

If you are back in A2 drop in at the Bakehouse and ask for Josh.


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#10 mgourley

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 07:16 PM

From a FSMA standpoint, the "approved" examples I have seen show receiving of ingredients as requiring a preventive control (if they contain allergens). This will not be required at the receiving step, but at a later step (labeling or packaging), but should be called out in your food safety plan at the receiving step.

 

Same with receiving packaging (if you have pre-printed packaging)

 

See attachment.

 

Marshall

 

 

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#11 jpollock

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 07:26 PM

From a FSMA standpoint, the "approved" examples I have seen show receiving of ingredients as requiring a preventive control (if they contain allergens). This will not be required at the receiving step, but at a later step (labeling or packaging), but should be called out in your food safety plan at the receiving step.

 

Same with receiving packaging (if you have pre-printed packaging)

 

See attachment.

 

Marshall

Thanks Marshall. We had quite a robust discussion in my FSPCA class about these examples and whether or not they had too many preventive controls or not. Doing the exercise some groups had very few, arguing that GMPs provide an adequate level of control, while others had more, arguing that the process/ingredient was risky enough to warrant preventive control. None of the groups had as many PCs as the example. Part of our receiving and allergen control PRPs cover the receipt, identification, and segregation of allergens. Getting the right label on the right product is absolutely a preventive control for us!


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#12 mgourley

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 09:53 PM

Right, but it is my understanding, from the FSPCA class, that the entire supposition of the "Food Safety Plan" is to assume that there are no PRP's already in place. Therefore you would need to identify preventive controls to mitigate a hazard at any step.

In a nutshell, this is the main difference between HACCP and the acronym that will not die, HARPC.

 

For example, receiving an ingredient that contains allergens requires a preventive control, maybe not at the receiving step, but someplace along the process. This is of course not HACCP, because HACCP is supposed to have PRP's in place FIRST. This is the biggest problem I have with "HARPC". The intent, as I understand it, is to make food producers think "proactively" rather than be reactive. OK, that makes perfect sense to me, however, if you HAVE programs is place, that will minimize or eliminate a hazard at a later step, are you not being "proactive?".

 

This whole thing is causing confusion and unnecessary time wasted by thousands of people who just received partial guidance from the FDA on what they want, a week or two before the implementation date for companies that are not considered "small".

 

Still waiting for the actual "guidance" on these important distinctions that were missing from the draft "guidance" document that was recently promulgated by the FDA.

 

Marshall

 

This is also why "small" businesses have been sitting around, waiting for meaningful guidance, to work up "acceptable" food safety plans. Why spend the time and resources to do something that may be overkill?

 

Political Rant: Government cannot mandate a one size fits all regulation for a business segment that is so diverse. The vast majority of food producers/processors are not going to willingly kill people. That tends to be bad for business.

End Political Rant:


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#13 jpollock

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Posted 02 September 2016 - 11:20 AM

Right, but it is my understanding, from the FSPCA class, that the entire supposition of the "Food Safety Plan" is to assume that there are no PRP's already in place. Therefore you would need to identify preventive controls to mitigate a hazard at any step.

In a nutshell, this is the main difference between HACCP and the acronym that will not die, HARPC.

 

For example, receiving an ingredient that contains allergens requires a preventive control, maybe not at the receiving step, but someplace along the process. This is of course not HACCP, because HACCP is supposed to have PRP's in place FIRST. This is the biggest problem I have with "HARPC". The intent, as I understand it, is to make food producers think "proactively" rather than be reactive. OK, that makes perfect sense to me, however, if you HAVE programs is place, that will minimize or eliminate a hazard at a later step, are you not being "proactive?".

 

This whole thing is causing confusion and unnecessary time wasted by thousands of people who just received partial guidance from the FDA on what they want, a week or two before the implementation date for companies that are not considered "small".

 

Still waiting for the actual "guidance" on these important distinctions that were missing from the draft "guidance" document that was recently promulgated by the FDA.

 

Marshall

 

This is also why "small" businesses have been sitting around, waiting for meaningful guidance, to work up "acceptable" food safety plans. Why spend the time and resources to do something that may be overkill?

 

Political Rant: Government cannot mandate a one size fits all regulation for a business segment that is so diverse. The vast majority of food producers/processors are not going to willingly kill people. That tends to be bad for business.

End Political Rant:

Preacher, choir. Thanks Marshall.  Good to know I am not alone in the wilderness.


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#14 better2hermans

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Posted 23 February 2017 - 08:33 PM

Hi,

 

Just new here as i m new to bakery operations that was recently task to me . What will be the ideal food flow for bakery operations that will guide us in implementing HACCP in our production. If anyone can share me  a simple food flow ,will greatly be appreciated. 

 

Thanks '

 

Nel


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#15 pizzagrl1

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:40 PM

Good morning.

Can anyone forward a sample HARPC plan for bakery goods ( cookies, muffins)?

I am struggling with FSMA.

Thank you.


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#16 Charles.C

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 01:28 AM

Good morning.

Can anyone forward a sample HARPC plan for bakery goods ( cookies, muffins)?

I am struggling with FSMA.

Thank you.

 

Hi pizzagirl,

 

The difficulty is that the plans tend to be process specific.


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Charles.C






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