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Combined product recall and crisis management procedures


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#1 aps

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 07:50 PM

Hi

 

I would like to know your comments and if possible example of procedures

 

Do you combine your product recall procedure with your Crisis management as this is slightly different is it not. 

 

cheers


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#2 Jcchaser

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 11:52 AM

This year we did because, what we used for our Crisis management was we had a two shipment of meat that contaminated.  We did the Crisis management issues first and out of that we had to do a recall because the product was shipped. 

 

Jcchaser


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#3 aps

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Posted 19 August 2016 - 08:20 PM

OK Great

 

Do suppose you could share a procedure


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#4 shather

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 12:39 AM

Hi, 

 

In my view, integrating incident management, product recall and crisis management is very important. Every company will have an incident - there is no such thing as perfect systems, processes or people; some may lead to a product recall but it does not have to be a crisis - that is totally dependent on how the company responds. 

 

I like to use the following steps - although I should note that incidents are rarely linear so jumping around the steps is normal. 

 

  1. Identification - understanding that an incident has occurred whether it be product related, an accident, a criminal act; whatever it is the company needs to recognise something has happened, and escalate it to the right people quickly. Good plans identify triggers and escalation points, contact lists etc
    1. a) Emergency response - immediate actions that need to be taken to protect people - staff and consumers, and key assets
  2. Investigation - some incidents are significant enough that they require investigation. That may include getting internal or external tests done, engaging an expert in a certain ares, going back through production records etc etc. Good plans contain an investigation checklist to make sure key elements are not missed
  3. Assessment - this is a process of determining the risk to consumers, customers and other stakeholders from not just a health and safety point of view but also a reputation point of view. Good plans have a simple to follow but well structured methodology for assessing risk.
  4. Response strategy - this is the development of an appropriate response taking into account the expectations of key stakeholders. A good response strategy identified the key question - how do we want to be seen by our key stakeholders when this incident is resolved? Good plans require the management team to ask key questions and come up with a clear strategy for responding
  5. Communications - development of key messages that relate to the response strategy. Many companies outsource this to PR companies. Don't do it! Pr companies are masters at coming up with corporate PR bumph that most consumers see right through. Social media has become the great leveller when it comes to communications. Good plan include guidance on how to put together key messages and a communication plan - and then use PR companies to get YOUR message out
  6. Implementation - this might include implementation of recall or instigation of a business continuity plan. In a large scale incident it includes setting up a comms centre and fielding communications. Good plans provide easy to follow guidance on how to implement a response
  7. Measure - constantly reviewing the effectiveness of your response so, if neccessary, the strategy or implementation can be adjusted. Good plans contain some guidance on key performance indicators and how to measure performance against them
  8. Close - this includes letting people know the results of your response and getting back into business. In reality, companies should start planning for and implementing a plan for getting back to business early. These plans are often included within business continuity plans but are just as important in product recall situations
  9. Learn - it is important to review and identify lessons learned and changes that need to be made. This includes things that went well as well as things that didn't. While most people understand the need to make an improvement as a result of a failure, if you understand why something worked well and document it so you can repeat it, it is just good luck!

As you can see this process relates to any type of incident. By having an integrated plan you can ensure you have a consistent approach to any incident that occurs. Many companies have separate, disconnected recall and crisis management plans. Unfortunately that often means that the more crisis related parts (assessment, response and communications) only get looked at after a recall goes pear-shaped. You are then dealing with a crisis that you didn't have to have!

 

For more information, check out the new International standard for product recall, ISO10393. While not specifically directed at food, it contains good guidance and a broader perspective on responding to incidents.

 

 

 


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#5 Foodworker

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 08:51 AM

I used to combine them, but over the last couple of years, I have used separate procedures.

 

This is because a crisis may occur which does not affect product safety, quality and legality. Examples would be problems with raw material supply, political issues, strikes etc. These crises have to be managed for business reasons and a well thought out Crisis Management Procedure in advance will save a lot of tears when the problem occurs. Making it up as you go along in a stressful situation is never the best approach.

 

Of course, there may be crises which could affect product safety, quality and legality such as malicious intervention, floods, power failures etc and there has to be linkage between the two.

 

On the whole people, when faced with a crisis such as a strike, wouldn't naturally think "What does my Product Recall Procedure say?" they would think "What does my Crisis Procedure say?"


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