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Environmental testing for popcorn factory


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#1 Sussy

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 01:13 AM

what pathogens would I have to check for in a popcorn factory?

 

Secondly, I know it was discussed on the forum several times, but is there a database where I could find hazards related to specific foods? the Canadians have very good resources but they don't have all food items in the reference database for Hazard Identification.

 

http://active.inspec...introe.aspx?i=1

 

Would anyone know of another source?

 

 


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:26 AM

Hi suusykraus,

 

Searching this forum may also help, eg this page -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...earch_in=forums

 

eg -

http://www.ifsqn.com...ize-micro-risk/

 

 the widest scope database i know is Microorganisms in Foods,Vol6,2005. This is Chapterized by Food Commodities. Sadly it has no hits for popcorn.

 

I have seen one or two, more haccp-specific compilations, but these were privately commisioned.

 

Here's one more from Google with more chemical oriented fears -

 

Attached File  Popcorn Pop & roll product specification.pdf   21.4KB   20 downloads


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Charles.C


#3 Slab

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:26 AM

Hi, Sussykraus;

 

My first concern would be the presence of yeasts, molds and fungi (in particular a. flavus).

 

There is this thread which Charles C. has posted several helpful links and downloads:

 

Raw Maize Micro Risk

 

You may also find some micro limit relevance in ch. 20 under the following publication:

 

Attached File  ICMSF 2.pdf   812.8KB   16 downloads


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#4 Sussy

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 01:19 PM

Thank you.

 

I guess Listeria would be an environmental, process-related risk and mycotoxins and salmonella would be a raw material hazard, but this should be taken care of at the harvester level and a COA or letter of guarantee should cover that, coupled with a warehouse/storage/FIFO pre-requisite program at the facility.

 

The question is, do I still need to test for salmonella and mycotoxins on a regular basis or is a listeria program to prove efficacy of sanitation and personal hygiene program enough?


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#5 Slab

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 07:10 PM

Thank you.

 

I guess Listeria would be an environmental, process-related risk and mycotoxins and salmonella would be a raw material hazard, but this should be taken care of at the harvester level and a COA or letter of guarantee should cover that, coupled with a warehouse/storage/FIFO pre-requisite program at the facility.

 

The question is, do I still need to test for salmonella and mycotoxins on a regular basis or is a listeria program to prove efficacy of sanitation and personal hygiene program enough?

 

You should screen and validate SSOP for all identified pathogens of concern (via your hazard analysis). 


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 02:04 AM

Hi Sussy,

 

FS Standard/Authority (if any) ?

What is the process ?

 

The requirements for P(pathogen)EM are typically analysed via zoning for RTE via the actual product/process and  risk assessment.

There are some detailed PEM explanations/layouts on the Forum, eg peanut roasting. But it all "depends".

 

here are 2 more popcorn-related documents i noticed -

 

Attached File  popcorn - salmonella survivability.pdf   143.8KB   14 downloads

Attached File  popcorn - mycotoxin significance - FDA guidance.pdf   122.13KB   14 downloads


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Charles.C


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#7 Sussy

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 03:24 AM

very interesting article... I would think that microwave heating, being uneven, would be worse than conventional cooking methods. Now I am wondering about air-popping versus wet-popping.

 

but in order for a kernel to pop, the water inside has to reach 212 degrees F and when the pressure gets to high, the kernel pops. That temperature should be enough to kill salmonella...

 

no specific standard, third-party audited.

 

very simple process. kernels are air popped or wet popped in kettles, salted/spiced on the table where it spills over, conveyer takes it to packing machine. popcorn is bagged and boxed. Now I am thinking if the kernels come with a COA, then there's no risk of salmonella or mycotoxins, therefore we need an approved supplier program which should take care of that. Other than that, contamination could only come from poor employee hygiene. if there's a thorough employee hygiene and sanitation program in place, it just has to be proven effective and it's good to go. 

 

to be proven effective, is testing for listeria enough? do we need to test for salmonella as well? is it possible to have cross-contamination from the raw seeds? how do you prevent cross contact if the popcorn comes out at the same place where the seeds go in? 

 

I might just be overthinking it and if the seeds come from a reputable supplier and is stored well, there is no significant risk with the raw material. 


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 23 August 2016 - 06:59 AM

Hi sussy,

 

I would expect most 3rd party auditors to issue a standard detailing their requirements. This should give you some specific expectations. Regardless, the minimum requirements will typically be those of any Regulatory-related authorities.

 

A summary of  hazards in popcorn was given  in previous linked thread. A short FSMA summary for (I guess, too much text to read) unpopped and a short Australian for (I assume) popped are  below –

 

Attached File  FSMA popcorn - hazards.png   118.37KB   0 downloads

Attached File  S.Australia - popcorn2 - hazard.png   71.08KB   0 downloads

 

I deduce yr process is basically receiving unpopped popcorn, popping it, flavouring it, packing it, labelling it, storing it.

As per my post in previous thread/ yr description, IMO there is 1 potential CCP which is the popping stage. I deduce you have no metal detector which would have been a second CCP. I anticipate you will need to validate the bacterial reduction at the popping stage.

The popping stage sounds similar to some oven baking processes inasmuch as  raw/”cooked” share the same area. Since no physical separation of raw/cooked, for baking ovens BRC had to make a special case for this scenario where the (lack of) risk of cross-contamination had to be specifically approved by the auditor. No idea as to FDA’s viewpoint or other 3rd party.

I assume product is “rapidly” cooled/processed/transferred to storage after popping so no significant hazard due spores such as B.cereus. This needs to be validated.

 

Environmental micro. risks after popping are presumably controlled by GMP and might be 3rd party (via FDA regulations?) expected to be subject to validation/monitoring, eg L.mono, Salmonella. I’m not familiar enough with this product area/FDA-USDA to guess.

(In US in period 2010-2014, I noted one popcorn Recall due L.mono.)


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Charles.C





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