Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Calculating percent (%) DV (daily value) for protein?


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 omgdudette

omgdudette

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 1 posts
  • 0 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 06 September 2016 - 06:03 PM

Hi All,

 

Does anybody have advice on calculating %DV for protein (for a protein claim)?

I know this much:

 

%DV is protein grams/16 *100

To calculate protein grams = protein per servings x PDCAAS

PDCAAS = a.a score x recipe protein digestibility. 

a.a score is found on genesis so I don't have to worry about it

recipe protein digestibility = addition of all protein digestibility of ingredients x % of these ingredients.

 

I can't find the comprehensive list of protein digestibility of ingredients. 

I looked at "Protein Quality Evaluation", FAO, Rome 1990 but it only list select food items (no chicken or pork found in this report which is a common food ingredient).

 

If anyone has any advice, it is much appreciated.


  • 0

#2 FurFarmandFork

FurFarmandFork

    QA Manager/FS Blogger

  • IFSQN Senior
  • 447 posts
  • 226 thanks
35
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA

Posted 07 September 2016 - 08:24 PM

1. Not sure where you got your protein %DV calculatin from. Both FDA and USDA use 50g as the daily value for protein (for a 2000 Cal diet). So your calculation would be 

(g protein per serving)/50*100

 

2. I always considered meat to have a digestibility score of 100%, since animal proteins all ride up there and the ultimate impact on your protein calculation is minimal (in mixed protein products). But if you want to be more precise, I would use the beef score from the report you referenced, or round down for safety. Your product is either going to meet the claim requirements for "high" or whatever you want, or it isn't. Build in a buffer on your labeling so that on analytical testing you'll hit the mark. Single proximate testing isn't expensive, have it done on a sample of your product if you're making claims.


  • 0

For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users