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Is N-Phenylbenzamide banned by EU using in fruit and vegetable product

N-Phenylbenzamide EU fruit and vegetable products

Best Answer Charles.C, 10 November 2016 - 03:12 AM

Hi xugang,

 

Below is from a little searching on the net regarding EC legislation.

 

This EC summary addresses the general topic of food safety with respect to chemicals -

 

http://ec.europa.eu/...mical_safety_en

 

The legislation applied seems to primarily derive from Regulation(EC) No396/2005.

 

The page linked below gives links to specific legislation on pesticides. The left (expandable) menu offers sub-details for pesticides +  other categories as mentioned in 1st link above -

 

http://77.245.87.41/...US/Default.aspx

 

The MRL (maximum residue levels) sub-topic eventually yields a pdf attached below with lists of food categories (inc.fruit/vegs) vs specific controlled chemical MRLs.

 

The compilation program is on-going via Annexes 1-7. As I understand, the scope of the choice of  controlled chemicals is risk-based.

 

The 2 chemical names N-phenylbenzamide / benzanilide  seem totally absent from a pdf search.

 

 

PS - note that the 2nd URL above gives links to 2 databases. Neither link yielded a database for me.

 

PPS - I presume that it is also possible that the chemical of interest may occur within other categories, eg "contaminants".

 

P3S - it is unclear to me as to the consequence of a "random" detection of a ("suspicious"?) chemical residue not in any of  the various official list(s) of regulated items. Maybe there is a caveat added somewhere in the "fine" print.

 

I suggest that if you have no evidence that the residues of an insecticide X are associated with a specified tolerance, the operative MRL be (provisionally) set at zero (ie not detectable). This is the Precautionary Principle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

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#1 xugang

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 10:09 AM

Hi~everybody,

 

Today I read about a term" N-Phenylbenzamide".  What's the difference between " N-Phenylbenzamide" and "benzoyl"?

 

Has it banned by EU in fruit and vegetable products nowadays? If yes,  when?

 

What about regulations about N-Phenylbenzamide in other countries, such as the US, Canada, Japan and so on?  

 

 

I am looking forwad to your answers and help.

 

 

 


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 06:22 AM

Hi xugang,

 

This compound appears to have at least 30 “synonyms” –

Attached File  BENZANILIDE _ C13H11NO - PubChem.pdf   105.02KB   7 downloads

 

the list of currently “approved” EC additives is, afaik, below –

Attached File  CELEX_02008R1333-20160525_EN_TXT.pdf   4.01MB   12 downloads

 

The 2, seemingly, most common synonyms (N-phenylbenzamide, Benzanilide) do not appear in 2nd pdf. Perhaps you can test the remaining 10-12 chemical synonyms yourself. :smile:

 

Note – I found up-to-date EC lists are elusive. I do not 100% guarantee the above one (ca consolidated 2016). The EC database wud not work with me.

 

I suspect other countries may be equally complicated.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 Simon

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 06:39 AM

P.S. Please do not post multiple threads on the same topic; your original topic will be answered in due course.  We send a newsletter once a week and so more members will see and perhaps respond.  You just need to be patient.

 

Thanks for your cooperation.

 

Regards,

Simon


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#4 xugang

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 09:48 AM

P.S. Please do not post multiple threads on the same topic; your original topic will be answered in due course.  We send a newsletter once a week and so more members will see and perhaps respond.  You just need to be patient.
 
Thanks for your cooperation.
 
Regards,
Simon



Hi Simon.
Sorry. I will not do that again and be patient . Thank you very much.


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#5 xugang

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 01:45 AM

Hi xugang,
 
This compound appears to have at least 30 “synonyms” –
attachicon.gifBENZANILIDE _ C13H11NO - PubChem.pdf
 
the list of currently “approved” EC additives is, afaik, below –
attachicon.gifCELEX_02008R1333-20160525_EN_TXT.pdf
 
The 2, seemingly, most common synonyms (N-phenylbenzamide, Benzanilide) do not appear in 2nd pdf. Perhaps you can test the remaining 10-12 chemical synonyms yourself. :smile:
 
Note – I found up-to-date EC lists are elusive. I do not 100% guarantee the above one (ca consolidated 2016). The EC database wud not work with me.
 
I suspect other countries may be equally complicated.


Hello Charles.
Thank you very much.Your reply is really appreciated. But I still have a question:It seems that N-phenylbenzamide is not a direct food additive in the situation that I came across but often used as a material of pesticide of fruits and vegetables. So I don't know if it banned by EU as a material of pesticide of fruits and vegetables now.

I looked a lot of websites but still can not find related information. So I came here for help.

THANK YOU and waiting for your reply.


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 11:27 AM

Hello Charles.
Thank you very much.Your reply is really appreciated. But I still have a question:It seems that N-phenylbenzamide is not a direct food additive in the situation that I came across but often used as a material of pesticide of fruits and vegetables. So I don't know if it banned by EU as a material of pesticide of fruits and vegetables now.

I looked a lot of websites but still can not find related information. So I came here for help.

THANK YOU and waiting for your reply.

 

Hi xugang,

 

Sorry, i don't know either. It may be explained in the detailed text relating to my attachment in Post 2.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#7 Charles.C

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 03:12 AM   Best Answer

Hi xugang,

 

Below is from a little searching on the net regarding EC legislation.

 

This EC summary addresses the general topic of food safety with respect to chemicals -

 

http://ec.europa.eu/...mical_safety_en

 

The legislation applied seems to primarily derive from Regulation(EC) No396/2005.

 

The page linked below gives links to specific legislation on pesticides. The left (expandable) menu offers sub-details for pesticides +  other categories as mentioned in 1st link above -

 

http://77.245.87.41/...US/Default.aspx

 

The MRL (maximum residue levels) sub-topic eventually yields a pdf attached below with lists of food categories (inc.fruit/vegs) vs specific controlled chemical MRLs.

 

The compilation program is on-going via Annexes 1-7. As I understand, the scope of the choice of  controlled chemicals is risk-based.

 

The 2 chemical names N-phenylbenzamide / benzanilide  seem totally absent from a pdf search.

 

Attached File  en_Reg839_2008.pdf   800.65KB   4 downloads

 

PS - note that the 2nd URL above gives links to 2 databases. Neither link yielded a database for me.

 

PPS - I presume that it is also possible that the chemical of interest may occur within other categories, eg "contaminants".

 

P3S - it is unclear to me as to the consequence of a "random" detection of a ("suspicious"?) chemical residue not in any of  the various official list(s) of regulated items. Maybe there is a caveat added somewhere in the "fine" print.

 

I suggest that if you have no evidence that the residues of an insecticide X are associated with a specified tolerance, the operative MRL be (provisionally) set at zero (ie not detectable). This is the Precautionary Principle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#8 xugang

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Posted 10 November 2016 - 06:35 AM

Hi xugang,

 

Below is from a little searching on the net regarding EC legislation.

 

This EC summary addresses the general topic of food safety with respect to chemicals -

 

http://ec.europa.eu/...mical_safety_en

 

The legislation applied seems to primarily derive from Regulation(EC) No396/2005.

 

The page linked below gives links to specific legislation on pesticides. The left (expandable) menu offers sub-details for pesticides +  other categories as mentioned in 1st link above -

 

http://77.245.87.41/...US/Default.aspx

 

The MRL (maximum residue levels) sub-topic eventually yields a pdf attached below with lists of food categories (inc.fruit/vegs) vs specific controlled chemical MRLs.

 

The compilation program is on-going via Annexes 1-7. As I understand, the scope of the choice of  controlled chemicals is risk-based.

 

The 2 chemical names N-phenylbenzamide / benzanilide  seem totally absent from a pdf search.

 

attachicon.gifen_Reg839_2008.pdf

 

PS - note that the 2nd URL above gives links to 2 databases. Neither link yielded a database for me.

 

PPS - I presume that it is also possible that the chemical of interest may occur within other categories, eg "contaminants".

 

P3S - it is unclear to me as to the consequence of a "random" detection of a ("suspicious"?) chemical residue not in any of  the various official list(s) of regulated items. Maybe there is a caveat added somewhere in the "fine" print.

 

I suggest that if you have no evidence that the residues of an insecticide X are associated with a specified tolerance, the operative MRL be (provisionally) set at zero (ie not detectable). This is the Precautionary Principle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

Hi Charels,

 

THANK YOU so so much for your kind help.

 

Best Regards,

 

Xugang


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