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Literature references for cooking temp & holding time of sauce

Cooking CCP Sauce Cooking temperature holding time Savoury sauces CCP Limit

Best Answer Charles.C, 09 February 2017 - 08:34 AM

Hi YT,

 

I suggest that the most heat resistant microbial species in yr various meat products is L.monocytogenes.

 

If so the minimal heat treatment for pasteurization is as per my previous post.

 

Acordingly, assuming yr data refers to the slowest heating point, the conditions you mention exceed the minimal requirements from a food safety POV.

 

Some relevant background material for yr perusal -

 

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#1 rimuyt

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 09:41 AM

Hi all

I am currently working on our HACCP plan for Asian (Korean) seasoning sauces / pastes (e.g. chicken/beef/pork/seafood concentrate). The products are not high acid sauces. Basically the raw materials will go through extraction/concentration before being cooked.

 

I am having trouble looking for literature reviews/guidelines to support our chosen critical limit which is "Cooking temperature > 80°C  and holding time > 15 minutes." 

 

Most of the literature I found are for cooked meat products which might not be too applicable for my product types.

 

 

Any info will be much appreciated  :thumbup: 

Thanks

 

YT


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 02:10 PM

Hi all

I am currently working on our HACCP plan for Asian (Korean) seasoning sauces / pastes (e.g. chicken/beef/pork/seafood concentrate). The products are not high acid sauces. Basically the raw materials will go through extraction/concentration before being cooked.

 

I am having trouble looking for literature reviews/guidelines to support our chosen critical limit which is "Cooking temperature > 80°C  and holding time > 15 minutes." 

 

Most of the literature I found are for cooked meat products which might not be too applicable for my product types.

 

 

Any info will be much appreciated  :thumbup: 

Thanks

 

YT

 

Hi YT,

 

I assume the cooking process is at normal atmospheric pressure ?

 

Please inform the specific microbial target species which is associated with yr proposed  critical limit.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 rimuyt

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 03:57 AM

Hi YT,

 

I assume the cooking process is at normal atmospheric pressure ?

 

Please inform the specific microbial target species which is associated with yr proposed  critical limit.

 

Hi Charles,

 

Yes it is normal atm pressure.

 

Target microbial organisms are TPC, Salmonella, E Coli, Coliforms, Clostridium, B. cereus


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 04:30 AM

Hi Charles,

 

Yes it is normal atm pressure.

 

Target microbial organisms are TPC, Salmonella, E Coli, Coliforms, Clostridium, B. cereus

 

Hi YT,

 

Thks for response.

 

TPC, E.coli, Coliforms are typically not regarded as pathogens for current purpose. Clostridium is not a species.

 

Just as an example, from a safety POV, the UK requirements frequently (but not exclusively) focus on L.monocytogenes whereby a 6D reduction is considered to be minimal for pasteurization and requires achieving a lethality such as that provided by maintaining a temperature of 70degC for 2min at slowest heating point (SHP). In practice achieving an instantaneous temperature at SHP of 75degC is often implemented as being equivalent.

 

The USA often focus more on salmonella "family" species. IIRC these typically (but maybe not all)  tend to be less heat resistant than L.mono.

 

Other European countries, eg France, Spain may have different targets. These can be more heat resistant than L.mono and involve longer heating times.

 

Based on risk assessment you need to select one species, logically the most heat resistant which presents a significant risk.

 

Perhaps you can clarify the methodology which generated yr current critical limit ?


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#5 rimuyt

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 06:17 AM

Hi Charles

 

The processing method for the products as designed by R&D is slow cooking method (e.g. 75degC for 2-4 hours depending on product type). 

 

I have inhouse microbiological data to validate that the "Cooking temperature > 80°C  and holding time > 15 minutes." is effective in eliminating the bio. hazard.

 

What I am having trouble is, gathering scientific documents to demonstrate that our chosen process control measure can adequately eliminate the specific hazard. 


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 08:34 AM   Best Answer

Hi YT,

 

I suggest that the most heat resistant microbial species in yr various meat products is L.monocytogenes.

 

If so the minimal heat treatment for pasteurization is as per my previous post.

 

Acordingly, assuming yr data refers to the slowest heating point, the conditions you mention exceed the minimal requirements from a food safety POV.

 

Some relevant background material for yr perusal -

 

Attached File  tg1 - Temperature Guidance for Cooking,2004.pdf   213.92KB   19 downloads

Attached File  tg2 - temperature guidance for cooking raw meat,2015.pdf   1.11MB   19 downloads

Attached File  tg3 - Guidance for low temperature cooked food,ca.2012.pdf   459.77KB   19 downloads

Attached File  tg4 - Rare burgers, BHA,2015.pdf   1.88MB   16 downloads


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#7 pablo coronel

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 03:46 PM

I think we need more information regarding your product.

What is final pH; salt content; water activity; will the product be refrigerated; etc.

Are the sauces filled hot or cold?

I believe your treatment ( 80C - 15 Min ) is a pasteurization process, in which most vegetatives will be properly reduced but spores will not.

 

Some resources:

http://www.fda.gov/F...s/ucm100158.htm


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#8 rimuyt

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 08:16 AM

Hi YT,

 

I suggest that the most heat resistant microbial species in yr various meat products is L.monocytogenes.

 

If so the minimal heat treatment for pasteurization is as per my previous post.

 

Acordingly, assuming yr data refers to the slowest heating point, the conditions you mention exceed the minimal requirements from a food safety POV.

 

Some relevant background material for yr perusal -

 

attachicon.giftg1 - Temperature Guidance for Cooking,2004.pdf

attachicon.giftg2 - temperature guidance for cooking raw meat,2015.pdf

attachicon.giftg3 - Guidance for low temperature cooked food,ca.2012.pdf

attachicon.giftg4 - Rare burgers, BHA,2015.pdf

 

Hi Charles and pablo, 

 

Thanks for the materials, I will read through them and discuss with my team.


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