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Sanitiser and corrosion of nickel coated machine parts


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#1 MDG

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 05:53 AM

Hello,

we are using peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide based sanitizer for our dairy plant. after the probable use of six months we observed rusting in nikel coated machine parts.

Technical expertise is required for the possible cause of corrosion.

 

Thank You


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 06:19 AM

Hello,

we are using peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide based sanitizer for our dairy plant. after the probable use of six months we observed rusting in nikel coated machine parts.

Technical expertise is required for the possible cause of corrosion.

 

Thank You

Nickel plated ?

 

Does the nickel also come into contact with food ? Or anything else ?

 

Please elaborate.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Charles.C

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:38 AM

addendum

 

Sorry, i missed the "coated" in the title

 

3 more queries - (a) room temp use only ? ie what is the machine doing ?  (b) what is under the nickel,iron ?


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#4 MDG

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 04:57 PM

Pl. find the information below:

 

1) Nickel also come in contact with food.

2) Room temperature is 25 to 27 degree centigrade in summer and 22 to 24 degree centigrade in winter.

3) Machine is a ice cream freezer and it's a coupling part between the scrapper blade and electrical motor

4) Stainless steel coated with nickel

 

Hope this information will help .


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#5 Ryan M.

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 12:41 AM

Hmm...with almost 20 years experience in dairy (in the US) I'm confused why there is nickel plating over stainless steel?  Stainless is the preferred material for dairy operations and almost all food manufacturing.

 

Was the plating done because the stainless was corroded and pitted?

 

Your current sanitizer mix is corroding your equipment.  You have to work with your chemical supplier to find a sanitizer that is suitable for nickel.  Although I think it is in your best interest to eliminate all nickel in your facility and stick with only stainless steel.


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#6 SQFconsultant

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 01:25 AM

Have never seen nor heard of a dairy operation using nickel coating on stainless - did ownership decide to send them out one day for coating because of pitting or something?  Your sanitizer is the cause in all likelihood.

 

Get rid of the nickel and contact your sanitizer chemical supply company for assistance in locating a better match.


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 03:34 AM

I wonder if the OP was actually referring to a Ni alloy ?

 

http://ecoursesonlin...iew.php?id=3968

 
32.4.6 Nickel and its alloys This metal is used as a coating for milk/dairy product contact surfaces of pasteurizing vats coolers etc. Ni-alloy used in freezing chamber of ice-cream freezers, cylinders and plungers of homogenizers, etc. It has very slight effect on milk flavour although the most soluble in milk among dairy metals. It is mildly toxic. An alloy with iron makes it very tough and is quite difficult to handle during fabrication. However this metal is much more durable than tin coating, but it is more expensive. Lactic acid causes corrosion of this metal however it is not corroded by the alkaline washing powders. The highest disadvantage in the use of this metal is that it is more costly when compared with the chromium and tin

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#8 MDG

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:46 AM

Attached File  Freezer part.jpg   143.27KB   0 downloadsAttached File  Freezer part.jpg   143.27KB   0 downloadsAttached File  Freezer part.jpg   143.27KB   0 downloadsThanks for all the reply .attaching the photographs of new machine parts and corroded machine parts it may help to give the feedback.


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#9 MDG

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 04:49 AM

The part was coated by manufacturer itself and supplied to us.


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#10 Charles.C

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 05:21 AM

The part was coated by manufacturer itself and supplied to us.

 

Hi MDG,

 

I assume the part involved was original to the unit and not a refurbishment.

 

Unfortunately it's not my area of expertise but you may need to study the chemical aspects of nickel coating a little..

 

Regarding the corrosion, I suggest you directly query to the manufacturer as to whether (a) the "Ni" coating methodology is appropriate to yr usage as earlier described and (b) If the answer to (a) is Yes, was the coating perhaps imperfectly carried out or of sub-standard quality.

 

This document discusses some of the possibilities/criteria  -

 

Attached File  Nickel coatings.pdf   526.62KB   10 downloads

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.


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Charles.C


#11 Ryan M.

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 03:19 PM

Time to have a discussion with your manufacturer.  Specifically...ask them why they are using the nickel coating?  Are they, or you, familiar with 3A dairy equipment standard?  We use it in the US.  No coating allowed.

 

http://www.3-a.org/


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#12 Charles.C

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 05:49 AM

Time to have a discussion with your manufacturer.  Specifically...ask them why they are using the nickel coating?  Are they, or you, familiar with 3A dairy equipment standard?  We use it in the US.  No coating allowed.

 

http://www.3-a.org/

 

Hi Ryan,

 

Thks for the comment and the link but latter seems not accessible without ($$).

 

Is there any accessible USDA document which details a similar scope ? (I looked but could ony find refs to 3-A).(I also noted that the 2001 (!) ed. of 3-A does include info. on nickel-coated components.)


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Charles.C


#13 Ryan M.

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 03:56 PM

Hi Ryan,

 

Thks for the comment and the link but latter seems not accessible without ($$).

 

Is there any accessible USDA document which details a similar scope ? (I looked but could ony find refs to 3-A).(I also noted that the 2001 (!) ed. of 3-A does include info. on nickel-coated components.)

 

For US Dairy Industry we follow the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO), which can be found in the link below.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...k/UCM513508.pdf

 

 

The USDA, Agricultural Marketing Service (inspects milk/dairy for product grading and export of products outside USDA), has their own equipment standard, which mirrors the PMO.

 

https://www.ams.usda...g Equipment.pdf

 

 

The 3-A site has some information without needing to pay.

 

http://www.3-a.org/K...dards-Practices


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#14 Charles.C

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 12:27 AM

Hi Ryan,

 

Thks for the links.

 

As you noted, SS is clearly the usual material of choice although I deduce from the 3-A web-page that some alternatives to stainless steel may be acceptable, eg -

 

The benchmark for materials is the AISI 300, excluding 301, Series Stainless Steel or the Alloy Cast Institute (ACI) for cast equivalents. Metals that can be demonstrated to be at least as corrosion resistant as the AISI 300 Series Stainless Steel and are nontoxic and nonabsorbent are also acceptable. Exceptions to the AISI 300 Series Stainless Steel are usually permitted for specific materials reviewed by the 3-A Working Groups when the required function does not allow for the use of the AISI 300 Series Stainless Steel.

(Perhaps the current 3-A Standard expands on acceptable alternatives/functions)

 

The USDA link is dd 2001 and looks same as mentioned/commented in post 12. Still current ?.

 

Regardless, I think the advice in Posts 10,11 is the easiest way to go.

 

@ MDG - Comments ?


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Charles.C


#15 Ryan M.

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 03:13 PM

Yes, other metals with similar properties to stainless steel are acceptable, but typically cost prohibitive, e.g. Titanium, platinum.

The USDA reference is the most current, even at 2001 date.

OP should ask the manufacturer about 3A standard. I'm guessing the make dairy equipment for other countries so they should be aware of the standard.


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