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What critical equipment should be calibrated in a dairy plant?

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#1 tombentom789

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 04:26 PM

Hello everyone,

 

Recently, I'm on the new role for GMP auditor. During the 1st audit, I engaged lots of specific control equipment which are already expired their calibration period.

 

The problem is there are lots of specific control equipment in my plant (dairy plant). But at least I think there must be a base for some critical specific equipment to calibrated. (for example: specific control equipment for CCP, QCP, pPRP) 

 

Could you give some advice on what specific control equipment must be calibrated, HOW to determine their calib frequencies and besides CCP,QCP... is there any other needed category? Do you have any references?

 

*Note: On the way during the audit, I also engaged in some pressure gauge of NH3 tank and steam tank which are already expired on calib date. But when I require the supervisor to do the calib. He said it's not critical so just let them be!

I dont think its reasonable. Pls give me advice! Thank you!


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#2 mambo

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 06:16 PM

Calibration is a key component of a sound food safety and quality management system. As a baseline, the Company should have a Calibration Program.  The Calibration policy should specifically spell out all the equipment which have to be calibrated and the frequencies. A standard operating procedure would then detail how each equipment is calibrated and by who--including an individual who verifies that the calibration was done (verification). If any equipment has an expired calibration date, that's indicative of a non-conformance.

 

All control equipment must be calibrated. Frequency will be dependent on the criticality and resources needed for calibration. Could be daily, weekly, monthly or in some cases annually.


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#3 Ryan M.

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 11:44 PM

I would address the equipment around your CCP's and QCP's first.  For a dairy and CCP in mind it is pasteurization time and temperature.  You can reference the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance by the US Food & Drug Administration as it is the bible for dairy plants in the US.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...k/UCM513508.pdf


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#4 tombentom789

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 01:43 PM

Calibration is a key component of a sound food safety and quality management system. As a baseline, the Company should have a Calibration Program.  The Calibration policy should specifically spell out all the equipment which have to be calibrated and the frequencies. A standard operating procedure would then detail how each equipment is calibrated and by who--including an individual who verifies that the calibration was done (verification). If any equipment has an expired calibration date, that's indicative of a non-conformance.

 

All control equipment must be calibrated. Frequency will be dependent on the criticality and resources needed for calibration. Could be daily, weekly, monthly or in some cases annually.

Thank you mambo, indeed our company has its own standard stated that all monitoring equipment must be checked and recorded regularly (thermometer, pressure gauges...).

In addition, there's actually a local regulation specified about the issue. They also have a minimun requirement for calibration of each certain types of specific control equipment which is great too.

By the way, I'd like to know if there is some kind of method to help you determine the frequency of monitoring equipment for CCP or QCP?


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#5 tombentom789

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 01:49 PM

I would address the equipment around your CCP's and QCP's first.  For a dairy and CCP in mind it is pasteurization time and temperature.  You can reference the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance by the US Food & Drug Administration as it is the bible for dairy plants in the US.

 

https://www.fda.gov/...k/UCM513508.pdf

Yes, I agree with it and thank you for your reference. Much appreciated! But could you briefly summarize what is the Ordinance about? Thank you :)


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#6 Ryan M.

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Posted 29 March 2017 - 01:53 PM

Yes, I agree with it and thank you for your reference. Much appreciated! But could you briefly summarize what is the Ordinance about? Thank you :)

 

Yes, a regulatory enforceable guidance document for Grade A milk/dairy operations in the US.  It includes requirements around equipment design and operation, construction, use of materials for product contact surfaces, QA/QC specification requirements, and anything and everything relating to Grade A milk / dairy operations.

 

There is a summary on the first few pages.


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#7 tombentom789

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Posted 31 March 2017 - 09:22 AM

Yes, a regulatory enforceable guidance document for Grade A milk/dairy operations in the US.  It includes requirements around equipment design and operation, construction, use of materials for product contact surfaces, QA/QC specification requirements, and anything and everything relating to Grade A milk / dairy operations.

 

There is a summary on the first few pages.

My plant is now at grade B agains the corporate standards since it involves no milk powder products. But anyway, this is a very nice reference, Ryan.


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