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Magnets Foreign Material

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#1 jfox

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 07:34 PM

Can anyone provide me with a website or resource for selecting the appropriate magnet for our application? I have heard things like flow rate, pipe size, and distance from product all play a role but I was hoping for a "calculator" of sorts. 

 

We do formulated tomato products (salsa, sauces, etc...) 

 

 

Any help would be great! 


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#2 IchBinGnade

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 02:15 AM

You may directly contact magnet suppliers or check their websites. You can check mesutronic, eriez, mettler toledo, etc.


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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 05:37 AM

Can anyone provide me with a website or resource for selecting the appropriate magnet for our application? I have heard things like flow rate, pipe size, and distance from product all play a role but I was hoping for a "calculator" of sorts. 

 

We do formulated tomato products (salsa, sauces, etc...) 

 

 

Any help would be great! 

 

Hi jfox,

 

Not my area at all but first file (2008) attached discusses how the type of magnetic separator correlates to the application. As per previous post the decision surely needs some professional input.

 

2nd file is specific to sauces, purees etc and appears to regard viscosity/desired flow rate as the defining criteria for the type of separator described / offered.

 

Attached File  Magnetic separation for foreign bodies in Food.pdf   409.33KB   66 downloads

Attached File  magnetic separators for juices, soups, sauces.pdf   934.79KB   47 downloads

 

This link offers a free guidebook for the effort of an email address -

 

https://www.foodonli...he-best-me-0001


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#4 jfox

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 12:01 PM

Thanks guys. I checked out those resources. I like them but I was hoping for an easy guide to determining the magnet strength we would need or should use. I thought I had seen one at one time. Thanks for the prompt response. 


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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 01:28 PM

Thanks guys. I checked out those resources. I like them but I was hoping for an easy guide to determining the magnet strength we would need or should use. I thought I had seen one at one time. Thanks for the prompt response. 

 

Hi jfox,

 

Ah well, you should have specified yr interest more precisely. There are existing threads on this forum regarding magnet strengths. Maybe search a little.


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Charles.C


#6 Karenconstable

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 12:06 AM

Hi Jfox,

 

Here are some 'magic' numbers you can start with...

 

The numbers are from a voluntary standard available for 'final magnets' - that is, magnets that are the last point at which a ferrous contaminant could be removed from a finished product (sometimes a CCP). It says the magnet(s) should be a continuous type (ie not electromagnets) and should be a strength of 10000 Gauss.  Magnets that are used earlier in the process or that are not CCPs can be weaker.  You will want at least 85% of your product stream passing within 10 mm of the magnet(s).  The cleaning frequency is important ,especially in viscous products like yours, so look for magnetic equipment which allow fast and easy access to the magnetic parts so that you can monitor and clean off contaminants easily.  

 

You can purchase a copy of the standard from haccp-international.com.


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 04:23 AM

Hi Jfox,

 

Here are some 'magic' numbers you can start with...

 

The numbers are from a voluntary standard available for 'final magnets' - that is, magnets that are the last point at which a ferrous contaminant could be removed from a finished product (sometimes a CCP). It says the magnet(s) should be a continuous type (ie not electromagnets) and should be a strength of 10000 Gauss.  Magnets that are used earlier in the process or that are not CCPs can be weaker.  You will want at least 85% of your product stream passing within 10 mm of the magnet(s).  The cleaning frequency is important ,especially in viscous products like yours, so look for magnetic equipment which allow fast and easy access to the magnetic parts so that you can monitor and clean off contaminants easily.  

 

You can purchase a copy of the standard from haccp-international.com.

 

Here is an introduction/expansion for the above summary -

 

 

Attached File  Magnets for metal fragment control.pdf   666.14KB   68 downloads


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#8 jfox

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Posted 17 April 2017 - 02:15 PM

Great stuff thanks guys! 


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