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Procedure for cutting open a 50 lb. dry ingredient bag

Bag Opening

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#1 cbeelman

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 03:00 PM

Complaint: We have paper complaints from our finished products. The paper is being generated from the knives we are currently using to open our 50 lb. dry ingredient bags. Jagged cuts and missing paper. We are currently using and have used 6" Dexter Russell Boning Knives for 10+ years. When not in use the knives are stored in an open slit tray attached to the mixer. Currently cutting the bag open on the wide side w/a half moon cut and lifting both ends up to empty the bag.

Production does not want to remove the bag stitching to open the bag. New F.M.

Production does not want to remove the out layer. Too many bags, added $.

 

I recently purchased 5 sets of 3" paring knives and sheaths. Issued the to production. Recently informed the test failed => cut hand. Cut resistant gloves are not worn in the mixer area.

 

Thinking we need to approach bag opening from a whole different perspective.

 

Looking for some input for use of other similar knives, a source for videos/presentations on cutting 50 lb. dry ingredient bags, knife sharpening, storage and tracking programs, etc.

 

Thanks for your time.

 

 

- Curtis

 


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#2 RMAV

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 03:20 PM

Cutting bags without the foreign material can work well:

 

-The knife must be properly honed with no damage/nicks in the blade

-The cut must be a continuous motion with proper cutting technique

-Do not "re-cut" where the bag is cut

 

It takes training but it can be done without worry.


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#3 mgourley

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 05:58 PM

Or perhaps use "utility knives"?

 

 

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#4 QAGB

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 07:46 PM

Or perhaps use "utility knives"?

 

 

To MGourley's point,

 

What is your reason to use the boning knife for opening the bags? We use retractable utility knives as well, and we don't have foreign materiality complaints arising from the paper bags very often, if at all.

 

Another point is that we do have sieves/screens in place further down the line that should catch any loose paper if a jagged piece were to get through the system. As long as the blades are sharp enough, one clean cut should be enough to evacuate the bags using a utility knife.

 

 

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#5 RMAV

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 08:44 PM

Utility knives have their own potential perils.  Even so, the only place I've been that we did not use them for bags was in a RTE meat facility. Depending on the environment and materials, I would suggest disassemble/clean daily, change the blades daily. 


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#6 peeviewonder

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:10 PM

I recommend a 'martor' safety knife, like this:  https://www.martor.c...mdp-110700.html . We used them at my old workplace, in the mixing station for opening bags of powder that were then dumped into a high speed mixer (making chocolate milk and egg nog). The blade automatically retracts, so the only way you can cut yourself is if you are using an unsafe method of cutting (cutting towards yourself). The one I linked to is metal detectable, and made for the food and pharmaceutical industry. The blades are replaceable, so you don't have to worry about honing a knife, just change the blade when it gets dull. I would be more worried about the injuries at your workplace than the customer comments. You might look in to some safety training on knife handling. I certainly would not advocate a fixed-blade knife unless it was absolutely necessary, and the employee was vigorously trained. Good luck.


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#7 QAGB

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 12:07 PM

Utility knives have their own potential perils.  Even so, the only place I've been that we did not use them for bags was in a RTE meat facility. Depending on the environment and materials, I would suggest disassemble/clean daily, change the blades daily. 

 

Very true, RMAV. The types of knives used would definitely depend on the risk level of the process. We're low risk, so utility knives are fine for our operation. The kind we use are very easy to disassemble and they get inspected when people return for a new blade. We definitely don't change blades daily; and they get cleaned pretty frequently since we work with sticky products (sugars).

 

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#8 Ryan M.

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 05:00 PM

We use heavy bladed knives and we do sharpening in-house.  The heavy blade helps to prevent any damage and potential of breakage of the blade.  It is also autoclavable so we can clean them, then sterilize if needed.  However, we only use them in raw areas, prior to pasteurization, so they really don't need to be sterilized.

I don't like utility knives because the blades have a greater potential for chipping and breakage.  And, if they aren't handled correctly parts can fall off.  Of course, this is also dependent on the design.


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