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Nutrition Labeling of Multi-component package


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#1 QARegulatoryProfessional

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 07:14 PM

Can someone please explain how to determine serving size for a package consisting of several spices and/or seasoning blends meant to be combined in a recipe and eaten together? I am struggling trying to understand the RACC chart. For example, consider a salt, spice, and cheese powder packaged in separate bags in the same box meant to be used in a provided recipe for a soup. I feel I may be making this too hard...


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#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 08:37 PM

Your RACC/serving size is based on the product as consumed, not as packaged. So you need to calculate the nutrition of the finished product as it's intended to be eaten and use the RACC for a soup product, then convert to what proportion of your packaging makes that amount. While you may have a more complex product, it's no different than Kraft mac'n'cheese giving nutrition for finished mac'n'cheese, rather than for the cheese pouch, pasta, milk, and butter.

 

For some examples and a step-by-step walkthrough, you can check out a post I did on serving size a few years ago. Anatomy of a "serving".


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#3 QARegulatoryProfessional

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 11:40 AM

Your RACC/serving size is based on the product as consumed, not as packaged. So you need to calculate the nutrition of the finished product as it's intended to be eaten and use the RACC for a soup product, then convert to what proportion of your packaging makes that amount. While you may have a more complex product, it's no different than Kraft mac'n'cheese giving nutrition for finished mac'n'cheese, rather than for the cheese pouch, pasta, milk, and butter.

 

For some examples and a step-by-step walkthrough, you can check out a post I did on serving size a few years ago. Anatomy of a "serving".

Consider a drink mix (i.e. seasoning and sugar in separate packages intended to go into an alcoholic beverage). The RACC for a beverage is 360 mL (12 fl. oz). My total weight of package only contains 1.5 oz of product. So I need to determine how much of this will make 360 mL? 


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#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 07:19 PM

Consider a drink mix (i.e. seasoning and sugar in separate packages intended to go into an alcoholic beverage). The RACC for a beverage is 360 mL (12 fl. oz). My total weight of package only contains 1.5 oz of product. So I need to determine how much of this will make 360 mL? 

Exactly, then you would need to round that off to a common household measure. So you need to know the density of your drink mix as well. Because if it takes 15g of mix to make 260mL finished product, then check out 15g, find out what nearest volume is a common household measure, and report your nutrition on that gram weight/volume.

 

Check out the blog post, it should really help you out. Also, don't sweat the nutrition too much. As long as it's reasonably accurate and you follow the regulations FDA has bigger fish to fry.


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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 





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