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Query on testing for egg allergen


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#1 Bakerkid

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 10:03 PM

I have a question about testing for egg allergen.  We are packaging a bun that has an egg wash applied and then baked.  I have been using the neogen test kit for egg.  I am not able to detect any residue of egg on the packing line before cleaning?   Someone @ neogen said that baking causes the egg protein to become "denatured"?   We still do a full cleaning and test after cleaning.  If there is not a positive result before cleaning,  does that mean that the test kit is not able to detect egg after it has been baked.  Or is the baking process making the egg coating on the bun hard enough that there is no transfer of allergens to the packaging equipment?  If I test the equipment that was used before the bake,  I get a positive result from the test.

 

My biggest concern is that all of the egg is removed during cleaning and that I can prove that fact.

 

Thanks


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#2 CMHeywood

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 10:05 PM

Cooking causes the proteins to link together - thus going from liquid egg to solid egg.

 

I don't know what they mean by "denatured".  That is sometimes used for ethanol that has a chemical added to it to prevent people from drinking it.

 

Neogen needs to advise if there test kits can detect cooked egg protein.


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#3 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 04:49 PM

Cooking causes the proteins to link together - thus going from liquid egg to solid egg.

 

I don't know what they mean by "denatured".  That is sometimes used for ethanol that has a chemical added to it to prevent people from drinking it.

 

Neogen needs to advise if there test kits can detect cooked egg protein.

Denature: destroy the characteristic properties of (a protein or other biological macromolecule) by heat, acidity, or other effects that disrupt its molecular conformation.

 

E.g. if you can denature proteins so that the shape no longer activates the ELIZA enzyme in a test kit, it won't be detected, regardless of whether or not it could still cause an allergic reaction.

 

Sounds like in your process ATP may be a better indicator that you have removed all organic soils from the surface rather than the specific allergen test. Or be happy that your equipment is effectively being "heat treated" to eliminate egg allergen proteins. 


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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 


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