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Signs for different types of plastic materials

plastic bottles chemical

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#1 smart17

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 10:29 AM

Dear all, 

 

I have attached some photos I would like to known why there are 7 different signs in plastic material .

Why are the  numbers  inside the arrows . ? What does that mean ?

which are been forbidden to come in contact with foods (3 ,6,7 )?

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#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 02:31 PM

None of these are explicitly forbidden as a category to come in contact with foods.  (In USA) If they are an FDA approved material (production process) they can be used. The crossed out chart looks like one someone from a consumer advocacy group made for plastics to avoid for various leeching components, which may have evidence that they are dangerous in high concentrations and therefore some consumers choose to avoid.

 

The numbers designate the type of resin used to make the plastic to aid in recycling.


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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 


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#3 smart17

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 02:38 PM

thanks a lot for the answer 

 

although I found this article from a research about 3 to 7

 

PA stands for bisphenol A. BPA is an industrial chemical that has been used to make certain plastics and resins since the 1960s.

BPA is found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Polycarbonate plastics are often used in containers that store food and beverages, such as water bottles. They may also be used in other consumer goods.

 

Epoxy resins are used to coat the inside of metal products, such as food cans, bottle tops and water supply lines. Some dental sealants and composites also may contain BPA.

Some research has shown that BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers that are made with BPA. Exposure to BPA is a concern because of possible health effects of BPA on the brain, behavior and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children. Additional research suggests a possible link between BPA and increased blood pressure.

However, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has said that BPA is safe at the very low levels that occur in some foods. This assessment is based on review of hundreds of studies.

The FDA is continuing its review of BPA, including supporting ongoing research. In the meantime, if you're concerned about BPA, you can take these steps to reduce your exposure:

  • Use BPA-free products. Manufacturers are creating more and more BPA-free products. Look for products labeled as BPA-free. If a product isn't labeled, keep in mind that some, but not all, plastics marked with recycle codes 3 or 7 may be made with BPA.
  • Cut back on cans. Reduce your use of canned foods since most cans are lined with BPA-containing resin.
  • Avoid heat. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health, advises against microwaving polycarbonate plastics or putting them in the dishwasher, because the plastic may break down over time and allow BPA to leach into foods.
  • Use alternatives. Use glass, porcelain or stainless steel containers for hot foods and liquids instead of plastic containers.

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#4 CMHeywood

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Posted 16 August 2017 - 10:01 PM

The symbols were first started by SPI (Society of Plastics Industries).  They are meant to identify the type of plastic.  Per the SPI, it does not guarantee that the plastic product is recyclable.

 

Code 7 is for other plastics that don't fill into 1-6, or contain more than one type of plastic.

 

I don't understand why PETE (Code 1) is crossed out.  Polyester is one of the more commonly recycled plastics.

 

The concern with PVC is unreacted vinyl chloride monomer which is a suspected carcinogen.

 

The concern with Polystyrene (PS) is unreacted styrene monomer.

 

The concern with Code 7 (miscellaneous plastics) is that it includes polycarbonate which historically has used BPA as mentioned above.


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#5 smart17

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Posted 17 August 2017 - 07:55 AM

Hi CMHeyood , 

 

A customer asked if our product is BPA free . In my production are using HDPE only to make bottles. 

However, its good to known about this thanks a lot 


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#6 beautiophile

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Posted 01 September 2017 - 02:00 AM

Most polymers themselves aren't harmful. The risk is usually, but not limit to:

- their additives which diffuse to the surfaces after a long time. (you can smell them when you come into a highly stocked warehouse)

- excessive solvents and/or catalysts remaining if poorly treated. 

- monomers, oligomers, side products from degeneration reactions (by heat or radiation). E.g. epoxy is very sensitive to UV, it is usually recommended not to expose directly to sunlight.

- other materials of co-process(es) (printed ink, lamination glue, etc.).

If you don't use BPA in your entire production line, you haven't got to worry it.


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