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Do I include equipment in the HACCP Plan?


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#1 Breezysharp

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 01:03 AM

I'm new to the position, redoing the haccp plan, should I just list the process steps in the hazard analysis or do I include augers, belts etc.? I know the flow diagram will more than likely have all equipment including transfer belts, augers ect. I never see that clearly defined! I've seen sample hazard analysis and they seem to show just process steps but I ask, "dose an auger or belt have the potential to introduce a potential hazard? My answer is yes! I'm on the fence about this, gut says go the extra 20 miles (lol) but not sure. Help!


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#2 Tony-C

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 05:23 AM

Hi Breezysharp,

 

I would agree with you, if they have the potential to introduce a hazard then they should be included in the flow diagram. Sometimes I see 'transfer' as a step in a flow diagram.

 

A step by definition can be a point, procedure, operation or stage in the food chain including raw materials, from primary production to final consumption and a flow diagram a systematic representation of the sequence of steps or operations used in the production or manufacture of a particular food item.

 
Since you believe there to be hazards associated with belts/augers and it is normal for the HACCP team to list all of the hazards that may be reasonably expected to occur at each step ​in preparation for hazard analysis I would include them in your flow diagram.
 
Kind regards,
 
Tony

 


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#3 Breezysharp

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 01:44 PM

So I understand that the belts/augers should be in the flow diagram, but to be clear u would add them to the hazard analysis as well? Because that's the gap I've been seeing, they're in the flow diagram but NOT in the actual hazard analysis . I.e., flow diagrams I've seen have receiving, hopper, auger, shredder, auger, mixer, auger etc. as the actual hazard analysis would have, receiving, hopper, shredder, mixer etc.


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 10:08 PM

Hi Breezy,

 

FS Standard = ?

 

It can be relevant.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Peaches

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Posted 21 August 2017 - 11:12 AM

In my experience, the hazard analysis should match all the steps in your flow chart.  So if it's on your flow chart, then there should be a hazard analysis conducted on that step.  


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#6 Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 04:12 PM

Dear Breezysharp,

 

(what is an auger? I searched internet and came on this definition: a tool with a helical bit for boring holes in wood. I do not really understand what this can be in food industry)

 

However, answering your questions.

Each process step have equipment or tools. You need to identify the hazards rising from equipment, tools including internal transport, etc. at the process step.

It is quite strange that your product flow only indicates machinery.

Would you be willing to share your product flow diagram?


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Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

#7 Caglar

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 04:30 PM

"dose an auger or belt have the potential to introduce a potential hazard? My answer is yes!

 

I think this is good enough reason to include it in the flow diagram and also in HACCP study. Isn't the purpose of HACCP study to determine/assess the potential hazards? You have determined a potential hazard. So you should definitely assess the risk.


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#8 Crabrays

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 04:58 PM

In our plant each process in the flow chart  is done in a piece of equipment for instance sub batching cooking is done in the cook kettle. I list the sub batching in the HACCP plan and the Kettle in step by step work instructions which include cleaning and sanitizing the equipment. 


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#9 Tony-C

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 05:24 PM

I'm a traditionalist so:

 

CODEX GUIDELINES FOR THE APPLICATION OF THE HACCP SYSTEM INTRODUCTION
The application of HACCP principles consists of the following tasks as identified in the Logic Sequence for Application of HACCP.
List all potential hazards associated with each step, conduct a hazard analysis, and  consider any measures to control identified hazards.
The HACCP team should list all of the hazards that may be reasonably expected to occur at each step according to the scope from primary production, processing, manufacture, and distribution until the point of consumption.
The HACCP team should next conduct a hazard analysis to identify for the HACCP plan, which hazards are of such a nature that their elimination or reduction to acceptable levels is essential to the production of a safe food. 

 

​If you have identified a hazard at a step that doesn't exist according to your flow diagram then clearly something is wrong.

 

Kind regards,

 

Tony
 


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#10 CMHeywood

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 07:21 PM

As Tony has pointed out, every process on your flow chart should have a corresponding hazard/risk analysis.  Every hazard should refer to the appropriate documents that provide the control.

 

If it contacts the food, then you need to address the potential hazards.


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#11 kamau

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 11:20 PM

I totally agree with Tony.

For instance in our case we have fruit conveying as a step on the flow chart.

On Hazard  analysis,we list down all the possible hazards associated with the step (fruit conveying) eg.belt peel offs,oil,metal,caustic residue etc.


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