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Hazards for ingredients that are absent in the CFIA Hazard Database


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#1 NicoD

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 05:41 PM

Hello everyone.

 

While working on a new HACCP plan for new products/processes/equipment, I found some ingredients are not mentioned/assessed in the 2008 CFIA Hazard Database.

 

I went through the scientific literature, but it looks like either a specific topic is absent (such as, you can find tons of papers about the given ingredient, but none mentioning specific hazards of it in the food industry context), or there is so much data that it would make an encyclopedia just to write about 1 ingredient in 1 HACCP plan.

 

How would you proceed?

 

Thanks.


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#2 mgourley

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 11:58 PM

Perhaps this document from the FDA?

 

Marshall


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#3 mgourley

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 11:59 PM

Sorry.. attached

Attached Files


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#4 NicoD

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 01:40 PM

Thanks mgourley, however, I had already tried with that.

Lots of products aren't there.

 

For example, I tried to search salmon or trout in it. Then I tried to search just "fish", but there's nothing.


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#5 FSQNNow

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 02:33 PM

CFIA: http://active.inspec...azdane.aspx?i=2

 

CategoryFISH / MARINE MAMMALS - RAW (WILD OR AQUACULTURE (FARM RAISED)) (SEE ALSO MARINE AND FRESH WATER ANIMAL PRODUCTS)

 

 

BiologicalPresence of parasites (e.g., Anisakis simplex [Octopus, Squid] Pseudoterranova decipiens, Diphyllobothrium latum [Trichinella nativa] specific to marine mammals)   Presence of pathogens (e.g., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes [marine mammals])ChemicalPresence of Ciguatera Toxin (in carnivorous tropical or reef fish [e.g.:, Barracuda, Amberjack, Moray Eel, Spanish Mackerel, Snapper, Grouper])   Presence of drugs residues (Farm raised species [e.g., Tilapia, Trout, Sturgeon, Sole, Salmon, Snapper, Paddlefish, Oscar, Milkfish, Mahi-Mahi, Halibut, Flounder, Eel, Red Drum, Char, Catfish, Carp and Bass])   Presence of environmental contaminants (e.g., heavy metals in fresh water fish, Marine mammals)   Presence of environmental contaminants (e.g., pesticides in fresh water fish)   Presence of histamine (e.g., Anchovies, Big Eye, Herring, Jack Crevalle, Mackerel, Mahi Mahi, Marlin, Blue Fish, Scad, Tuna, Wahoo)   Presence of tetrodotoxin from puffer fish and related species
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#6 NicoD

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 02:54 PM

 

CFIA: http://active.inspec...azdane.aspx?i=2

 

CategoryFISH / MARINE MAMMALS - RAW (WILD OR AQUACULTURE (FARM RAISED)) (SEE ALSO MARINE AND FRESH WATER ANIMAL PRODUCTS)

 

 

BiologicalPresence of parasites (e.g., Anisakis simplex [Octopus, Squid] Pseudoterranova decipiens, Diphyllobothrium latum [Trichinella nativa] specific to marine mammals)   Presence of pathogens (e.g., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes [marine mammals])ChemicalPresence of Ciguatera Toxin (in carnivorous tropical or reef fish [e.g.:, Barracuda, Amberjack, Moray Eel, Spanish Mackerel, Snapper, Grouper])   Presence of drugs residues (Farm raised species [e.g., Tilapia, Trout, Sturgeon, Sole, Salmon, Snapper, Paddlefish, Oscar, Milkfish, Mahi-Mahi, Halibut, Flounder, Eel, Red Drum, Char, Catfish, Carp and Bass])   Presence of environmental contaminants (e.g., heavy metals in fresh water fish, Marine mammals)   Presence of environmental contaminants (e.g., pesticides in fresh water fish)   Presence of histamine (e.g., Anchovies, Big Eye, Herring, Jack Crevalle, Mackerel, Mahi Mahi, Marlin, Blue Fish, Scad, Tuna, Wahoo)   Presence of tetrodotoxin from puffer fish and related species

 

 

Thanks. Yes I found fish products in the CFIA database, that was just an example I used to address the FDA document.

 

However, there are many other ingredients and products that cannot be found in neither of the databases.

 

A few examples:

 

• Dried Citrus Pulp

• Rosemary extract

• Duck meat (I found poultry and birds, however I believe HACCP plans should be very specific when it comes to hazard analysis)

• Kelp

• Salmon oil

• Pumpkin

 

etc.

 

I don't mean to ask you guys to do the research for me, these are just examples. My question is: how do big multinational companies do their HACCP hazard analysis.

 

I wonder if Nestle's HACCP team stumbles upon that rosemary extract for example, or any of the above, or a vitamin or anything that isn't in the CFIA or FDA databases. What do they do? How do they assess the potential hazards that are specific for those ingredients?

 

Thanks


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#7 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 04:26 PM

Hi NicoD,

 

I think you're looking for too specific of information. As to how Nestle does it, they have dedicated researchers that do the work you're doing now, and if it's a novel ingredient look to trade organizations or industry peers to assess hazards.

 

As for your examples, if you can't find the specific ingredient, you need to do your hazard analysis using a surrogate ingredient or your general industry knowledge of the category. For example, without doing any research on these ingredients at all, here's how I would start looking at these:

 

• Dried Citrus Pulp: Dried products, upstream hazards from source fruit, is this a raw product with high expected micro or pasteurized, is final moisture content critical to stability or to my use, is this a "juice" that needs patulin controls?

• Rosemary extract: Is this extract in alcohol or oil so that I can handle it as if it were alcohol/oil? Does the rosemary itself impart a particular risk when it's raw, is this highly refined?

• Duck meat (I found poultry and birds, however I believe HACCP plans should be very specific when it comes to hazard analysis): I disagree. Same hazards as other poultry, see FDA guidance for "game meats" for any others.

• Kelp: Dry, wet? This is essentially a leafy green and you can treat it as a dried one or a fresh one

• Salmon oil: so this is an oil. Is it highly refined so that you can treat it as oil only, or if it isn't what hazards could the salmon contribute (heavy metals etc.)

• Pumpkin: same as any other gourd. Has to follow the produce rule and associated hazards.

 

Pumpkins and cucumbers are the same, duck meat and game poultry are the same. Your hazard analysis needs to list your specific ingredient but there's no reason that a cornish game hen should have drastically different hazards than chicken.


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For discussions related to food safety, production, and agriculture. Check out my blog at http://furfarmandfork.com/.

 


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#8 NicoD

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 05:43 PM

Wow! Thanks so much!!

 

Okay I'll follow the path you suggested.

 

By the way, except the oil and duck meat (frozen) it's all dry ingredients (powders, or flakes).

 

Thanks.


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#9 Charles.C

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 03:15 AM

Hi Nico,

 

I agree with 3F that a substantial amount of "grouping" is in practical use. It's almost unavoidable in practice except where a certain item is well-known to have a specific individualistic vulnerability.

 

There are a few specialist books/encyclopediae which cover micro. characteristics of a huge range of basic commodities/groups of commodities, one notable one is the ICMSF Microorganisms in Foods, volume 5.

 

Additionally some member/stockholder organisations have commissioned subscription volumes specifically for food "hazards" of basic groups. , eg Australia

 

But afaik no, freely accessible, single text/reference claims to cover hazards  for "everything food".

 

IIRC, Nestle have in fact exampled their initial "working list" of potential hazards for assessing certain groups of commodities.


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#10 NicoD

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Posted 29 August 2017 - 12:34 PM

Thank you so much Charles.


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