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Work Trousers in Food production


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#1 trubertq

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 05:22 PM

HI all,

 

It's been a while, I've been busy.

 

A customer has requested one of my clients to consider having work trousers which are captive to the site.

 

The current protective clothing is a knee length white coat, long sleeves with sleeve protectors if necessary, white knee high wellington boots, hairnets , beard snoods yadda, yadda, yadda....

 

I am going to risk assess the necessity for trouser in this nifty little outfit. 

 

Auditor quoted Hygiene and allergen control. i.e. nuts eaten at home wiped hands on trousers ...I'm thinking there's about an couple of centimeters of fabric visible between boot and coat,unless the product fell off the conveyors ( which means it would be binned), and miraculously rubbed off the visible fabric of the trouser the risk is low.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Customer is European, I'm wondering do all European food processors have full trouser/coat combo?

 

 


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#2 BrummyJim

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 03:52 PM

It sort of makes sense, but I've never seen it in foods. It was the norm in the nuclear industry when I worked there, but the protection worked the other way round - protection from the product rather than protecting the product!


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#3 Snookie

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 10:07 PM

I think the auditor needs to get a life.  LOL  But that's my two cents.  


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#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 08 September 2017 - 06:54 PM

Overkill. Unless you have production lines that are running at boot/knee height, this is nitpicking.


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#5 usmanashraf

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 06:26 AM

No need


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#6 GMO

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:04 PM

HI all,

 

It's been a while, I've been busy.

 

A customer has requested one of my clients to consider having work trousers which are captive to the site.

 

The current protective clothing is a knee length white coat, long sleeves with sleeve protectors if necessary, white knee high wellington boots, hairnets , beard snoods yadda, yadda, yadda....

 

I am going to risk assess the necessity for trouser in this nifty little outfit. 

 

Auditor quoted Hygiene and allergen control. i.e. nuts eaten at home wiped hands on trousers ...I'm thinking there's about an couple of centimeters of fabric visible between boot and coat,unless the product fell off the conveyors ( which means it would be binned), and miraculously rubbed off the visible fabric of the trouser the risk is low.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Customer is European, I'm wondering do all European food processors have full trouser/coat combo?

 

Pointless.  Whenever people ask this kind of question, I point out that we don't wash our faces on entry into our production areas which are far more likely to have allergen residues.

 

There has to be some pragmatism at some point.  Also it needs to be considered that trousers cannot be put on hygienically.  They trail on the floor etc.  Then what happens when someone needs to go to the toilet?  Do they have to change out of their trousers to do so first?  If they don't, really, what is the point?


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