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HACCP documentation for a university assessment on frozen peas


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#1 Taryn Blair

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 01:48 AM

Hi all

As part of my BSc. Food Science & Tech degree we have to prepare HACCP documentation for snap frozen peas, as a group project.  My group is a bit confused as to whether receival of the fresh peas would be a CCP as we can't control the pesticide residues or heavy metal or lubricant contamination in peas, and within the  packaging the non-food compliant chemicals and we do not process (treat for possible rodent urine etc).  We have in place supporting programs with contracts detailing use of pesticides and lubricants & a regular pest control program with the suppliers/services but would like some advice to know we are heading in the right direction.

 

Our first CCP is the blanching stage of the process.

 

Kind regards

 

Taryn


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 03:02 AM

Hi all

As part of my BSc. Food Science & Tech degree we have to prepare HACCP documentation for snap frozen peas, as a group project.  My group is a bit confused as to whether receival of the fresh peas would be a CCP as we can't control the pesticide residues or heavy metal or lubricant contamination in peas, and within the  packaging the non-food compliant chemicals and we do not process (treat for possible rodent urine etc).  We have in place supporting programs with contracts detailing use of pesticides and lubricants & a regular pest control program with the suppliers/services but would like some advice to know we are heading in the right direction.

 

Our first CCP is the blanching stage of the process.

 

Kind regards

 

Taryn

 

Hi Taryn,

 

Sometimes different Countries have their own preferred haccp methodology. I'm unaware if this applies to Australia.

 

From a generic haccp POV, I suggest you read the haccp textbook of Mortimore et al especially regarding the handling of  process ingredients.

 

Offhand the answer could simply be to set the reception stage as a PRP (therefore haccp low risk) in respect to yr various noted potential hazards. The justification for PRPs could then be provided via (checked) lot documentation from Supplier and "occasional" haccp Verification thereof by Receiver.

 

haccp process analyses for RTE fresh produce can be complicated but also depending on the process.

 

(PS - I'm not sure how much specific help I'm able to give for this project)


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


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#3 AudreyB

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 12:21 PM

Hi Taryn, 

 

What type of HACCP decisional tree are you using? 

 

The way I like to think about eat hazard when completing a HACCP analysis is as follows - what is the risk (ie. pesticide residues on the peas), where is the hazard from / how did it occur (ie. pesticides used during cultivation leading to excess residues on the product), what is the frequency of this hazard (ie. all peas contain pesticides, 1 batch per month, etc ...) and what is the gravity of the hazard on the consumer (ie. pesticides exceeding regulated limit can cause adverse health effects and even death). Using this information, you can better complete a HACCP analysis as is allows you to determine if your PRP will completely control a hazard or if more control is necessary. 

 

In your examples (pesticides, heavy metals, and lubricant contamination) these are hazards which arise from improper supplier handling or practices. I see this being controlled by the following PRPs / procedures:

1) Supplier approval program - using suppliers who have been approved based on their own GFSI certification, self-assessments and onsite audis. You would also request certificate of analysis to confirm absence of pesticides and heavy metals. 

2) Receiving PRP 

3) Inspection / Analysis conducted by the receiver (ie pesticide testing, heavy metal testing, etc.) 

 

IMO I would not consider this a CCP since your PRP should be more than sufficient to control these hazards so long as they are efficient. 

 

Hope this helps, best of luck!


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#4 CMHeywood

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Posted 25 September 2017 - 02:20 PM

Here's my opinion:

 

CCP is a critical control point in the process where you can remove contamination or reduce it to an acceptable level.  You are not doing any contamination control when receiving the fresh peas.

 

However, you do have a program for your suppliers that many would consider to be a prerequisite program (PRP).  Inspection of the incoming peas would likely be considered a PRP.  Random testing of incoming peas for contamination would likely be considered a PRP.


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#5 Taryn Blair

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Posted 08 November 2017 - 02:53 AM

Thank you to everyone who replied to this topic and helped with their expertise and suggestions, thanks to you all we achieved the top mark in the class of 89% for our assignment!

 

Thanks again

 

Kind regards

 

Taryn


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