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Size of Recycling Batches?

recycling batch recycling batch size of batch

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#1 ZeroWasteAdvo

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 01:37 PM

When our recycling is processed, it's processed in batches.  These batches are important because if any type of contaminant or hazard (food, liquid, broken glass, etc) is found in the batch, the entire batch of recycling has to be thrown out.  I've been trying to figure out how large these batches are (weight, inches, however it is measured), and I'm wondering if anyone can lead me to an answer.



#2 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 04:06 PM

What are you recycling? Cardboard, paper, plastic?


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#3 ZeroWasteAdvo

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 04:37 PM

What are you recycling? Cardboard, paper, plastic?

 

Glass! (Bottles, food containers, etc.)



#4 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 08:38 PM

Okay, to melt down into new containers? Or is this a bottle washing procedure for food? I'm confused as to your application, you said above that broken glass would be considered a "contaminant" above.

 

Unless your recycling is part of a food production process this forum may not have the expertise you're looking for.


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