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How to implement a procedure for Food Fraud?


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#1 Brianna

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 03:06 AM

Hi, may I know how do we implement a procedure on food fraud in factory?


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 04:20 AM

Hi, may I know how do we implement a procedure on food fraud in factory?

 

Hi Brianna,

 

Please supply a little more context, eg -

 

Product ?

Process ?

FS Standard (if any) ?

Require procedure for Vulnerability Assessment or Food Defense ?


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Peter C.

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 05:38 PM

Hi Brianna,

     The first step is performing a food fraud vulnerability assessment. There are a number of tools and guidance documents available to walk you through this. Once you have completed your vulnerability assessment next is to perform an impact assessment, that is if food fraud were to occur, what would the impact be to public health and your organization. Finally, you would combine your vulnerability and impact assessments to determine which ingredients you should focus your mitigation strategies on. 

 

     From there you can create a food fraud mitigation plan specific to those ingredients which represent the highest risk. How you implement that plan will depend on a number of factors including why that ingredient is so vulnerable to fraud and what specific steps can be taken to mitigate those risks. 

 

Best Regards,

Peter


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 07:50 PM

Hi Brianna,

     The first step is performing a food fraud vulnerability assessment. There are a number of tools and guidance documents available to walk you through this. Once you have completed your vulnerability assessment next is to perform an impact assessment, that is if food fraud were to occur, what would the impact be to public health and your organization. Finally, you would combine your vulnerability and impact assessments to determine which ingredients you should focus your mitigation strategies on. 

 

     From there you can create a food fraud mitigation plan specific to those ingredients which represent the highest risk. How you implement that plan will depend on a number of factors including why that ingredient is so vulnerable to fraud and what specific steps can be taken to mitigate those risks. 

 

Best Regards,

Peter

 

Hi Peter,

 

Thks for input,

 

I would just note that, i think, GFSI (et al) focusses more on the VA aspect rather than further involving "Impact". This is a difference IIRC to the USP approach.

 

[Hence (partially) my unanswered Post 2.]


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 Peter C.

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:10 PM

Hi Charles,

    Great point. From my understanding of what is written in the GFSI benchmarks, it states that one should complete a documented vulnerability assessment (VA) and a documented food fraud mitigation plan. I would argue that in addition to the VA one should also complete an impact assessment so they understand the risk to their organization and where to focus their efforts. 

 

     What is IIRC?  

 

Best Regards,

Peter


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#6 Charles.C

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:42 PM

Hi Peter,

 

IIRC = If I recall correctly

http://www.ifsqn.com...-abbreviations/

 

Just as an example, BRC's response to GFSI  suggests (for reasons explained in their Guideline) a preference to use Likelihood of Occurrence vs Detection matrix to determine "sensitive" ingredients rather than the traditional "Severity" (~ Impact). BRC do not preclude use of alternative methods though.

BRC then suggest a range of ( sort of generic) mitigation procedures (~Preventive measures). Impact per se is, i think, not mentioned.

 

I think (not quoting BRC) that one practical difficulty in using "Impact" (eg as in the USP approach) is simply "how to do it". But i do appreciate this approach is a/the standard model in many published non-food "vulnerability" scenarios.


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Charles.C


#7 Peter C.

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 08:59 PM

Hi Charles,

    Thanks for that and I do need to increase my acronym knowledge!

 

     The impact approach looks at if food fraud were to occur one should look at the impact from two points. 

 

1 - Food Safety perspective

2 - Economic impact to that organization

 

     There are then 3 multipliers which could amplify the impact of either Food Safety or Economic impact. 

 

1 - Focused consumption: This could be highly concentrated consumption for certain groups, frequent consumption (for example taken daily, like vitamins) and temporally focused consumption such as foods commonly eaten during holidays.  

2 - Nutritional sufficiency: Pet food, baby food and infant formula where if the nutritional content has been reduced where it would cause a public health impact.  

3 - Public Confidence: The impact of a loss in consumer confidence and the indirect economic impact. 

 

Best Regards,

Peter


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 09:13 PM

Hi Charles,

    Thanks for that and I do need to increase my acronym knowledge!

 

     The impact approach looks at if food fraud were to occur one should look at the impact from two points. 

 

1 - Food Safety perspective

2 - Economic impact to that organization

 

     There are then 3 multipliers which could amplify the impact of either Food Safety or Economic impact. 

 

1 - Focused consumption: This could be highly concentrated consumption for certain groups, frequent consumption (for example taken daily, like vitamins) and temporally focused consumption such as foods commonly eaten during holidays.  

2 - Nutritional sufficiency: Pet food, baby food and infant formula where if the nutritional content has been reduced where it would cause a public health impact.  

3 - Public Confidence: The impact of a loss in consumer confidence and the indirect economic impact. 

 

Best Regards,

Peter

 

Hi Peter,

 

Yes, BRC in fact have reservations about the assumption you refer.

I think (1-3) illustrates the difficulty to which i referred previously. One can compare to the BRC approach.

But, nowadays, the most difficult aspect for food fraud assessors seems to be with the "database". ;)


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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