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Allergen soy on bakery product

soy allergen

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#1 roby

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 03:29 PM

Hello to everyone,

 

I 'm working in a bakery product factory, we made a type of bread.

 

I analyzed some of our products and I find traces of soy; exactly I found these results:

9 ppm, 8 ppm, 14 ppm, in different products. All our flour suppliers indicate a possible X-contamination by soy, so we decide to make some analisys to evaluate the presence in our product.

 

Please, do you have some study where I can find a threshold value for these allergen.

Do you think we need to indicate it in the label as "MAY CONTAIN..."

For now we report the possible X-contamination only in some product , because we are waiting to ristampe all the other labels.

 

How do you think I can manage this risk?

 

Thank you for your help!


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#2 Tony-C

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Posted 25 October 2017 - 07:38 AM

Hi Roby,

 

As you have suggested, I would use 'may contain'. Calculations need to take into consideration allergen threshold levels and serving sizes.

 

Here is some information from the FSA: EU FIC regulations on food labelling https://www.food.gov...belling-changes

 
And here advice on threshold levels - Summary of the VITAL Scientific Expert Panel Recommendations http://allergenburea...rt-Oct-2011.pdf
 
Kind regards,
 
Tony

 


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#3 roby

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 03:37 PM

Thank you Tony!!


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 29 October 2017 - 07:36 AM

Hello to everyone,

 

I 'm working in a bakery product factory, we made a type of bread.

 

I analyzed some of our products and I find traces of soy; exactly I found these results:

9 ppm, 8 ppm, 14 ppm, in different products. All our flour suppliers indicate a possible X-contamination by soy, so we decide to make some analisys to evaluate the presence in our product.

 

Please, do you have some study where I can find a threshold value for these allergen.

Do you think we need to indicate it in the label as "MAY CONTAIN..."

For now we report the possible X-contamination only in some product , because we are waiting to ristampe all the other labels.

 

How do you think I can manage this risk?

 

Thank you for your help!

 

Hi roby,

 

JFI - Regarding VITAL threshold data, can also see Post linked below whose VITAL attachment apparently updates a few of the data in Tony's second link,  although no change for soy.

Also note the various caveats. Afaik, the VITAL recommended data are currently, officiallly,  utilised in very few locations for labelling purposes.

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ge/#entry116956


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#5 moskito

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 09:05 AM

Hi,
For Risk Assessment I refer to the former FDA threshold group and today to Vital 2- nothing better available. The conclusion reg labelling you have to refer to local legislation esp if you export globally.
If you have a cross contamination check for GMOs - authorised and especially non authorised, esp if you sell in Europe.
Rgds
moskito


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#6 dfreund

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 12:15 PM

New Zealand has a nice guideline document

[PDF]2007 Allergen Management and Labelling Guide PDF - Allergen Bureau

allergenbureau.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Allergen_Guide_2007.pdf


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#7 roby

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Posted 01 November 2017 - 04:33 PM

thank you for your help. 

At the end the only solution is to indicate the possile cross-contamiantion in label.


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 02 November 2017 - 02:55 AM

thank you for your help. 

At the end the only solution is to indicate the possile cross-contamiantion in label.

 

Hi roby,

 

Thks for the feedback.

 

Probably a not infrequent conclusion.

 

This 2009 paper illustrates what may still represent various potential legal complexities.

 

Attached File  Some legal aspects involving 'may contain'.pdf   303.19KB   3 downloads


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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