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NC Section 2.5.1 Flow chart


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#1 Qualitelpcn

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 11:56 AM

Hello Everyone, 

On my last BRC audit, We receive a NC on our HACCP flow chart. 

This is what the auditor wrote on my report: 

2.5.1 Water was provided from well. It went through UV step as preventive measure for microbiological hazards. However, this step was not included in the flow charts

So now the Water step and UV is now inclueded in  the flow chart. Does any one have any exemple of how you verify the flow charts. We do a yearly plant tour and analyse each steps me and my HACCP team and we sign the Flow charts. But maybe this could be done by using a checklist to make sure everything was check.... does anyone have something I could base my self on for verification ??

 

Thanks 


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#2 Ehab Nassar

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 04:17 PM

Hi Qualitelpcn ,

 

this is normally through  using a physical walk-through of the process within the production area , you can print your flow diagram and go through all the steps , from receiving of raw material till distribution of the final product , then any step that included in the process and do not in the flow diagram should be noted and added to the chart .

 

another method is to use a physical tour , then write all the steps with all the control measures then at the office compare with the team what you have and what is documented in the flow chart.

 

Also I'd like just to highlight that if you have a UV lamp make sure that you have an appropriate method to prevent the hazard of glass splinters in case of UV lamp is broken , this is could be via SS strainer of any other appropriate method method it depends on your processes.

 

Interpretation Process flow diagram BRC :

An accurate flow diagram indicating all the process steps, including all inputs and outputs, needs to be constructed for each HACCP plan. This may be achieved through one diagram or in a modular form with several documents compiled to provide the complete information (in this situation it must clearly identify the interaction between the process steps). The Standard lists guidance on the points to consider and include when developing the flow diagram. This includes:
A plan of premises and equipment layout to facilitate consideration of cross-contamination risks (e.g. allergen control).
Raw materials – it should be clear where raw materials are stored and the routes they take into the production; this includes the introduction of utilities and other contact materials (e.g. water, packaging).
Sequence and interaction of all process steps (e.g. method of transportation between each step).
Outsourced processes and subcontracted work.
Potential for process delay (i.e. how products or ingredients will be handled if a delay occurs).
Rework and recycling.
Low-risk/high-risk/high-care segregation (i.e. clearly indicating where the different production zones are located).
Finished products, intermediate/semi-processed products, by-products and waste (e.g. where waste products leave the production process and the storage of intermediates and finished products).
 
Interpretation Verifying the flow diagram BRC
The flow diagram shall be verified as accurate. A member of the HACCP team who is based at the site, part of the team or the whole team must check that the flow diagram is accurate ‘by on-site audit and challenge’ and this may be achieved using a physical walk-through of the process within the production area. A report of the activity and any findings will help to demonstrate that this has been completed. The auditor is likely to undertake part or all of this process during the BRC Standard audit, so any anomalies between the documented controls and what is seen in practice may highlight a non-conformity.
It is vital that the process flow diagram remains up to date and therefore verification should occur whenever there is a review of the HACCP (e.g. whenever there is a change to the HACCP plan or operational activity) and at least once per year.
It is important that any daily or seasonal variations are considered during the verification process (e.g. the production of a Christmas product range that uses ingredients or processes not used during the rest of the year).

 

there is a link you can use 

 

https://haccpmentor....process-charts/

http://www.ifsqn.com...s-flow-diagram/

 

BR,

Ehab

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#3 Charles.C

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Posted 28 October 2017 - 05:15 AM

Hi Ehab,

 

Thks for the input and attachment.

 

I noticed the BRC brochure examples include temperatures/times on the flowcharts. Personally i have always avoided such and never had it auditor queried. I think it makes the flowchart look "cluttered" up.

 

@Qp, yr basic Verification Procedure sounds OK to me except that you might note the comment in attachment/re-iteration in Post2  -

 

It’s recommended that any new or amended processes or products are verified as soon as production commences and all diagrams must be verified at least annually

 


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#4 Qualitelpcn

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 03:36 PM

Hi Qualitelpcn ,

 

this is normally through  using a physical walk-through of the process within the production area , you can print your flow diagram and go through all the steps , from receiving of raw material till distribution of the final product , then any step that included in the process and do not in the flow diagram should be noted and added to the chart .

 

another method is to use a physical tour , then write all the steps with all the control measures then at the office compare with the team what you have and what is documented in the flow chart.

 

Also I'd like just to highlight that if you have a UV lamp make sure that you have an appropriate method to prevent the hazard of glass splinters in case of UV lamp is broken , this is could be via SS strainer of any other appropriate method method it depends on your processes.

 

Interpretation Process flow diagram BRC :

An accurate flow diagram indicating all the process steps, including all inputs and outputs, needs to be constructed for each HACCP plan. This may be achieved through one diagram or in a modular form with several documents compiled to provide the complete information (in this situation it must clearly identify the interaction between the process steps). The Standard lists guidance on the points to consider and include when developing the flow diagram. This includes:
A plan of premises and equipment layout to facilitate consideration of cross-contamination risks (e.g. allergen control).
Raw materials – it should be clear where raw materials are stored and the routes they take into the production; this includes the introduction of utilities and other contact materials (e.g. water, packaging).
Sequence and interaction of all process steps (e.g. method of transportation between each step).
Outsourced processes and subcontracted work.
Potential for process delay (i.e. how products or ingredients will be handled if a delay occurs).
Rework and recycling.
Low-risk/high-risk/high-care segregation (i.e. clearly indicating where the different production zones are located).
Finished products, intermediate/semi-processed products, by-products and waste (e.g. where waste products leave the production process and the storage of intermediates and finished products).
 
Interpretation Verifying the flow diagram BRC
The flow diagram shall be verified as accurate. A member of the HACCP team who is based at the site, part of the team or the whole team must check that the flow diagram is accurate ‘by on-site audit and challenge’ and this may be achieved using a physical walk-through of the process within the production area. A report of the activity and any findings will help to demonstrate that this has been completed. The auditor is likely to undertake part or all of this process during the BRC Standard audit, so any anomalies between the documented controls and what is seen in practice may highlight a non-conformity.
It is vital that the process flow diagram remains up to date and therefore verification should occur whenever there is a review of the HACCP (e.g. whenever there is a change to the HACCP plan or operational activity) and at least once per year.
It is important that any daily or seasonal variations are considered during the verification process (e.g. the production of a Christmas product range that uses ingredients or processes not used during the rest of the year).

 

there is a link you can use 

 

https://haccpmentor....process-charts/

http://www.ifsqn.com...s-flow-diagram/

 

BR,

Ehab

That is a great way to check the flow diagram. Wow thanks I didn't think of that as a revision for the flow chart. But I will certainly use that for preventive action. 


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