Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

HELP: Unable to identify the cause for PUFFING and HARDNESS in Cookies

flour baking Alveograph Cookies Cracker

  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 ShannieB89

ShannieB89

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 15 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Jamaica
    Jamaica

Posted 31 October 2017 - 10:15 PM

Hi Everyone:

 

Our manufacturing process is experiencing extensive puffing and hard texture of cookies/crackers when a particular's flour is used.

 

I am seeking knowledgeable expertise along with outside the box information as to this issue affecting our process. Also if persons could pose possible root cause questions to help investigate causes never thought about, that would be appreciated.

 

The situation is we were introduced to a new supplier of flour. Whenever that flour is run in soft cookies, it leads to puffing of the cookies. When it is used in crackers, there is a detectable crispier or hard-bite to the product requiring more chewing. I am very new (a baby) to the attributes of flour and am learning that protein levels affect the strength of the flour. That it, higher protein level = stronger flour = preferably bread making WHEREAS lower protein level = weak flour = preferably cookies and cracker manufacturing.

 

The only data I currently have is the Alveograph readings, both from the supplier and internal testing.... and being new, I am trying to interpret how these values affect overall production as well as whether they contribute to the puffing and hardness. When another brand of flour is used, though puffing might take place, it is not as extensive when the new flour is used. The only variance during the manufacturing process is the two different flours. Products are run under the same conditions yet still puffing occurs extensively in 1 and minimal in the other.

 

Though I am doing my best to read the literatures regarding flour, if persons could assist in answering these questions of mine:

 

1. What causes the puffing? (Current thoughts are its probably the release of some type of gas from the other ingredients e.g. Ammonium Bicarbonate)

 

2. What does the Alveograph values (P, L, W, P/L) represent in dummy terms (for me)?

 

3. Are there production processes (e.g. mixing, rotary, baking) that could be the cause for the puffing and hardness (e.g. uneven heat distribution during baking)?

 

4. How can I interpret the Alveograph readings to understand the issue I am experiencing (do they even relate?)?

 

ANY OTHER​ remarks/questions or curiosity you possess and wish to ask please do so that I can tackle any other underlying issues I am not considering

 

I APPRECIATE WHATEVER ASSISTANCE I CAN GET (Hopefully I am using the right forum-if not please recommend the correct forum)

 

 

Kind Regards,

Niesha

 


  • 0

#2 Zerokill_Guiding

Zerokill_Guiding

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 14 posts
  • 2 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 03 November 2017 - 05:43 AM

Where is the flour coming from and are you aware of the type? Winter or Summer?

The higher levels of proteins can cause issues.

We are a manufacture of a baked pretzel product.

 

We run our ovens and kilns at certain temps and times due to many different reasons, to include weather and humidity changes.


  • 0

Thanked by 1 Member:

#3 ShannieB89

ShannieB89

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 15 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Jamaica
    Jamaica

Posted 06 November 2017 - 07:15 PM

Where is the flour coming from and are you aware of the type? Winter or Summer?

The higher levels of proteins can cause issues.

We are a manufacture of a baked pretzel product.

 

We run our ovens and kilns at certain temps and times due to many different reasons, to include weather and humidity changes.

Hello, firstly thanks for asking some questions to which I didn't know all the answers.

 

1. The wheat is soft red winter

 

Temperature: Same here at our bakery, though we have specifications for time and temperature for our ovens, these vary depending on the weather. We don't monitor humidity and temperature of the internal factory though...I think that's something we should do. Do you monitor the temp and humidity of your bakery (environment)? If you do, how does this information benefit your process?

 

Do you do alveograph on the flour? If you do, do you interpret the readings? How do you interpret it?


  • 0

#4 Zerokill_Guiding

Zerokill_Guiding

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 14 posts
  • 2 thanks
0
Neutral

  • United States
    United States

Posted 07 November 2017 - 04:35 AM

Sorry for all of the questions, just trying to get a better background on your product and process.  

 

We do not test our flour here in our production facility. Our strains of winter and spring flour are very constant year round. We make a baked product that ultimately can be changed with time and temps in our ovens and kilns. 

 

After doing some research n the topic i located this helpful link id like to share with you.... After reading the website it looks as if you need to try some non red flour...

 

http://www.thefreshl...pring-vs-winter

 

How about your water testing? High Ph levels?

 

 

i hope this gves you some aide in the process


  • 0

#5 ShannieB89

ShannieB89

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 15 posts
  • 1 thanks
0
Neutral

  • Jamaica
    Jamaica

Posted 15 November 2017 - 07:39 PM

Sorry for all of the questions, just trying to get a better background on your product and process.  

 

We do not test our flour here in our production facility. Our strains of winter and spring flour are very constant year round. We make a baked product that ultimately can be changed with time and temps in our ovens and kilns. 

 

After doing some research n the topic i located this helpful link id like to share with you.... After reading the website it looks as if you need to try some non red flour...

 

http://www.thefreshl...pring-vs-winter

 

How about your water testing? High Ph levels?

 

 

i hope this gves you some aide in the process

All questions are welcomed Zerokill_Guiding. I will definitely read up on the link you shared. Any help I can get more than willing to take. The pH levels vary depending on the dough but the highest we have is 8.

 

Question: How does humidity affect your process?


  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: flour, baking, Alveograph, Cookies, Cracker

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users