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Air plate Exposure test Air Microbial test

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#1 shanedaganta

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Posted 20 November 2017 - 04:14 AM

Can anyone help me? I need to have a reference for air microbiological test for air plate exposure/settling plate for food packaging industry in flexible packaging material using film/plastic laminates. Also the standard count allowable or tolerance for yeast and mold and Aerobic Plate Count.

 

Example for dairy products Standard Counts: <10 - 180 cfu/m2/minute - Aerobic plate count, <10-50 cfu/m2/minute - Yeast and Mold.

Reference: NZTM 2: microbiological methods manual section 110: Air Sampling and testing exposure plate method issue 11.0 February 2005.

 

Do we have this for food packaging materials: flexible packaging material using film laminates.

 

Thank you so much.


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#2 Simon

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 07:55 PM

I would say there are no such standards for food packaging.


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#3 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 04:47 PM

I would say there are no such standards for food packaging.

Ditto simon. Collect some data from areas of your plant you consider "dirty" (or outside) and set a standard of "better than outside" or monitor periodically for potential problems.


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#4 Charles.C

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 07:31 PM

The situation might be more sensitive if an aseptic packaging scenario was anticipated.

 

Example for dairy products Standard Counts: <10 - 180 cfu/m2/minute - Aerobic plate count, <10-50 cfu/m2/minute - Yeast and Mold.

 

 

I hv no idea what this means mathematically ? Perhaps you could post an accessible link.


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#5 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:24 PM

Example for dairy products Standard Counts: <10 - 180 cfu/m2/minute - Aerobic plate count, <10-50 cfu/m2/minute - Yeast and Mold.

 

 

I hv no idea what this means mathematically ? Perhaps you could post an accessible link.

Sounds like it's a surface area "settle" standard to demonstrate how many CFU would land on a 1m sq surface per minute. So if I exposed a 10cm diameter plate to my environment for ten minutes and counted 5 colonies, that would be 5cfu/.785 sq meters/10 minutes or 39.25 CFU/sq meter/minute.

 

Not sure how meaningful that ultimately would be but it wouldn't be completely useless? Especially if you had an area with less stellar air quality you could determine how many CFU would be theoretically contributed as your product traveled through that space based on available surface area and length of exposure.


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#6 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:27 PM

Correction on my arithmetic, the area of that plate in my example above would be .00785 sq meters. Final answer would be 0.39 CFU/sq meter/minute.


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#7 Charles.C

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 04:26 AM

But why < (A-B) ?

 

Perhaps < should be = ?


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#8 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 05:25 PM

You mean the limits? No clue why those would be standardized.


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