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Ingredient Hazard Analysis - how does this look?

ingredients hazard analysis

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#1 TonyM

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 10:44 PM

I am updating our HACCP plans and finally adding something that Ive been leaving out, a hazard analysis of each ingredient. In the years that we've had this particular line up and running, we have never had an issue with any ingredients. I called out allergens as a chemical hazard but Im not coming up with any likely hazards otherwise. This is a low volume product line that we are running, so some of the ingredients are purchased at Cash & Carry or Restaurant Depot. I'd appreciate any feedback!


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#2 TonyM

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 10:46 PM

Forgot to attach.... here it is

Attached Files


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#3 TonyM

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:16 AM

Downloaded 36 times, 2 people followed the topic but replies. For anyone who looks at that list of ingredients, can anyone think of any potential hazards? There must be something I havent considered....


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#4 Timwoodbag

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:40 AM

I am no expert, but here are a few things to consider...

 

For Chili Peppers

 

This link thinks that heavy metal in sugars can be a worry.

https://www.research...lp_A_case_study

 

And last thing I have time for, isn't Maltodextrin sometimes made out of Wheat?  Maybe double check that yours is corn based or you're gonna have a bad time.


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#5 ati

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 08:15 AM

Maybe pesticide residue - garlic and sulphur dioxide - sugar.


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#6 Madam A. D-tor

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 08:59 AM

Dear TonyM

 

some suggestions:

- MCPD in soy sauce and oils;

- physical hazards are possible in almost all production processes. Depending on the product and on the process of the supplier these still can be present. Maybe process of supplier includes magnets, metal detector or sieve. This makes physical hazards less or more likely.

- are any of the products (e.g. sherry) packed in glass?  This is certainly a hazard and you should (probably have) implement control measures. Also consider other packaging materials. You don't want plastics or papers in your products.

- are all the products ambient stable? temperature abuse following growth of pathogens can be considered if you have chilled or frozen ingredients.

- sudan red in red coloured food

- moulds in ketchup, chilisauce. probably also in coconut milk?

- yeast in ketchup;

- is the chicken base fresh or dried? --> if it is fresh: bone particles, salmonella, listeria, staph aureus, allergen cross contamination, temperature abuse, ...

- PAKs in products that have been heated or smoked;

- allergens: what other allergens have the suppliers on site --> is cross contamination at the site of the supplier possible. e.g. peanut contamination in your garlic. Don't know if this is possible, but maybe the supplier handles peanuts (or other allergens)  on the same line. Are their control measures good enough.

- some of your products may also be vulnerable to food fraud.

- for dried products: packaging insufficient, products get higher moisture, growth of moulds and mycotoxins. Please be aware that some products, when getting mouldy are dried (e.g. ginger) or the mould is whipped of (e.g. chestnuts)

- aflatoxins in dried chilies;

- salmomella in dried spices;

 

in fact: buying your raw materials in cash and carry or restaurant depots is a hazard itself.

In my experience it is very hard to receive correct specifications. Sometimes you do not know who the producer is, so you do not have information about food safety control systems. You can not ask for advice or support. Traceability maybe difficult if you do not know the producer/supplier. Getting statements in case of incidents... etc.

 

I used the RASFF database to do a quick search. I am sure there will be such a database also in USA. Also a good source is riskplaza. However this is a paid database. I do not have access myself.


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Kind Regards,

Madam A. D-tor

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#7 debeerjp

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 11:33 AM

Hi TonyM

 

I would add physical hazards such as paper, plastic, string to sugar and other raw material. You have to risk assess.

 

If SO2 is a concern as an allergen, check your vinegars.

You can consider heavy metals on most ingredients and pesticides on any plant based product.

Test for Clostridium botilinum on any tinned product.

 

Depending on the method of manufacture, some soy sauce could have 3-MCPD (mostly in harsh acid hydrolysis).

 

Jaco


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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:19 PM

Hi TonyM,

 

I am intrigued as to the intended recipient for yr ingredient hazard analysis and associated Food Standard. And how you've managed to explain away the HA absence in previous audits. :smile:

 

It's only a matter of opinion but for me the numerous "none identified(s)" tend to suggest (rightly or wrongly) a token attempt to research potential hazards. Such text IMEX likely generates an auditorial query.

 

Again, it's not mandatory, but IMO the inclusion of a quantitative risk column(s) indicates a more complete evaluation from an auditorial POV. And maybe ticks a box.

 

I assume you have detailed product specifications for all the stated input items. (this is a frequent problem with buying things from supermarket counters).

 

Based on the product specifications, I preface the hazard analysis with a quick overview of some typical hazards associated with the (to follow) input items, grouped where possible. This then facilitates placing  entries into the "none identified".

 

Similarly, IMO, a suitable preventive control for typical potential hazards in some ingredients like additives, flavourings etc is that the latter are simply required to be certified as Food Grade.

 

As a partial example of above -

 

http://www.ifsqn.com...ge-4#entry50651


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C






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