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New BEIC/ CRRU Code of Practice


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#1 Irishlass105

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 01:15 PM

Hi guys,

 

New British Lion code of practice is in the final draft stage and a big change has been made to pest control. I am in a different opinion to my pest controller of a way forward although I may be wrong.

 

The new COP states that 'no long term baiting' is allowed and to reference CRRU. It states that long term baiting is not permitted and baiting is only to be used as a reactive treatment and makes reference to using break back traps as your standard monitoring device.

 

My pest controller (who i question everything that comes out of his mouth) has told me he can change to non-toxic bait and we can still use baiting on our laying farms and our packing centre which i disagree with. The standards make no reference to the type of bait being used they just state 'NO LONG TERM BAITING PROHIBITED'. So to be sure I would rather remove any kind of baiting and go break backs throughout all sites.

 

I understand there would be a big financial loss for pest controllers if baiting is no longer needed as once break backs are placed that is it and useless rodent problems are on sites then there is no way to make additional money. I believe this is why my pest controller is against removing all baiting. 

 

Can somebody please clarify?

 

Thanks,

IL


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#2 Charles.C

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 01:27 PM

JFI -

 

CRRU - Campaign for Responsible Rodenticide Use

BEIC - British Egg  Industry Council


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C


#3 Norman.Rosi

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 09:06 AM

Hy,
In Italy we got some limits to use the rodents poison in the outdoor bait stations,This limits are wrotes in the labels of the products and this big changement is a problem for all the pest control companies not because we get some reductions at our budget but because to transform all the bait stations in traps, specially outdoor, is very hard to do it at the same prices.The traps needs to be checked several days per week to eliminate all biological risk because the rodents are dead.One of the solution can be rappresented using the traps with liquid inside to disinfect the rodents but are more expansive that usual price and in case of damage the price is very expensive.
Best regards and happy new year
Norman

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#4 GMO

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 02:54 PM

My pest controller (who i question everything that comes out of his mouth) has told me he can change to non-toxic bait and we can still use baiting on our laying farms and our packing centre which i disagree with. The standards make no reference to the type of bait being used they just state 'NO LONG TERM BAITING PROHIBITED'. So to be sure I would rather remove any kind of baiting and go break backs throughout all sites.

 

 

I would go back to the Lion Egg people to get clarification.  I think your pest contractor may be correct in the intent of this clause as there has been a drive for some years to reduce the level of toxic baiting outside.  I don't think moving to break back traps would decrease your requirements for pest control, in fact it will increase it.  From an ethical point of view you will need to check break back traps weekly if you have no active infestation and possibly daily if you have active problems as they don't always deliver a clean kill but also you want clear traps if you have a problem, a sprung trap (which can happen if it's knocked) or a dead mouse is not going to do anything to kill other mice.   

 

Personally I do like break back traps as they at least do kill the rodents immediately (or at least catch it so it can be killed) but you need to have some not very squeamish members of staff who are prepared to kill a half dead mouse or expect to spent a lot on calling out a pest contractor to do so.  The problem can be a lot of rats and mice avoid them unless they are placed well (as you won't be able to use food as bait) and they are very targeted so a rat non toxic monitor will probably pick up mouse activity but a rat break back probably won't kill a mouse. 

 

I suspect the intent was that non toxic indicator blocks could still be used but as I said, check with British Lion.  Only they can interpret their own clauses!
 


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#5 FurFarmandFork

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 03:37 PM

.The traps needs to be checked several days per week to eliminate all biological risk because the rodents are dead.

 

 While I agree with this for indoor traps. For outdoor/farm traps, isn't a bunch of dead/dieing rodents filled with toxic rodenticide an even bigger hazard? They're just more out of sight?


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#6 GMO

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:39 AM

 While I agree with this for indoor traps. For outdoor/farm traps, isn't a bunch of dead/dieing rodents filled with toxic rodenticide an even bigger hazard? They're just more out of sight?

While I agree both are a problem, the monitors are normally very close to a building and if they then become infested with bluebottles or similar that could be a serious infestation hazard, much better if the rodent has crawled off to their burrow to die which is more likely and normally some distance away.  But as I said, it's rare nowadays (at least in the UK) to be permitted to use toxic baits outside because they cause deaths of birds of prey who catch dying rodents.


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#7 Norman.Rosi

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 07:10 PM

Hi FurFarmandFork

the trap that I talk about is dedicated to catch rodents and keep it in a anti fermentative liquid for weeks,

This concept is to reduce poison's traitment outdoor and keep the dead rodents in a disinfected liquid solution

until the PCO next monitoring.

The only problem about this system: is to be more expensive at the beginning that a bait station's rodents control management

See one of our post about it

 

http://www.romanidis...one-ecologica  

 

Best regards

Norman

Romani Disinfestazioni Lucca Tuscany Italy


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#8 GMO

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 06:44 AM

Hi FurFarmandFork

the trap that I talk about is dedicated to catch rodents and keep it in a anti fermentative liquid for weeks,

This concept is to reduce poison's traitment outdoor and keep the dead rodents in a disinfected liquid solution

until the PCO next monitoring.

The only problem about this system: is to be more expensive at the beginning that a bait station's rodents control management

 

I can't understand from the page quite what you mean but it seems like an interesting idea.  I suppose what would be ideal is a trap which is 100% effective at an instant kill whether it catches rats or mice and continues working after it's been activated once which I can't tell from your webpage whether that's the case.  This is one of the downsides to the break back traps, it's not just the fact a dead rodent body is there (with the potential to be an attractant to flies) but also the death may not be clean, sometimes the rodent is just injured or has a slow death and secondly once the trap is activated, the trap no longer works.  Additionally break back traps are more specific to species than baits. 

 

The other problem I have with break backs as your only monitor is you don't know what's triggered it unless it catches something and they don't always work.  I'd love to know if your system is different?  Break backs can be triggered by being knocked, by a rodent who manages to get away or possibly even by slugs and snails if used outside.  So your contractor does his / her monthly walk round, finds triggered break backs with nothing in them, what do they do?  Do they just reset them and walk away?  Or do they switch to toxic baits assuming there's an active infestation?  The latter does seem like an overreaction but the former seems like a weak response.  At least a non toxic rodent block shows you not only what is there but what has nibbled it slime = slugs, the whole block is gone or mostly gone = rats, dainty nibbles = mice.  Also non toxic baits and toxic baits change the colour of the rodent droppings (differently) so if you see droppings inside or outside you can then tell if they are taking your baits so you know the rodent is dying or it can be a reason to switch to toxic then if you need to.


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#9 GMO

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Posted 04 January 2018 - 06:44 AM

While I agree both are a problem, the monitors are normally very close to a building and if they then become infested with bluebottles or similar that could be a serious infestation hazard, much better if the rodent has crawled off to their burrow to die which is more likely and normally some distance away.  But as I said, it's rare nowadays (at least in the UK) to be permitted to use toxic baits outside because they cause deaths of birds of prey who catch dying rodents.

 

Sorry I should say, it is permitted to use toxic baits outside but only when there is active infestation.


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