Jump to content

  • Quick Navigation
Photo
- - - - -

Infused Beef Fat


  • You cannot start a new topic
  • Please log in to reply
1 reply to this topic

#1 nomio1972

nomio1972

    Grade - Active

  • IFSQN Active
  • 5 posts
  • 6 thanks
2
Neutral

  • United Kingdom
    United Kingdom

Posted 03 January 2018 - 09:46 AM

My company wants to look at producing an infused beef fat product as we have beef fat as a by product of our stock production. Ordinarily our process is to heat 90deg for 10mins, hot fill and rapid chill which gives a extended shelf life chilled product. The infused fat cannot be taken up to 90deg as it affects product quality, and it cannot be hot filled as the tubs are not heat stable.

 

What time/temp would provide me with the kill I need? Does it need to be hot filled or am I better doing a shorter shelf life. Sorry lots of questions,

I'm afraid I know little or nothing about solid fats and so I'm hoping someone might help me 

 

Thanks


  • 0

#2 FurFarmandFork

FurFarmandFork

    QA Manager/FS Blogger

  • IFSQN Principal
  • 908 posts
  • 408 thanks
56
Excellent

  • United States
    United States
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:USA

Posted 03 January 2018 - 02:28 PM

Note: I have not worked with a product like this before, not an expert.

 

If you're keeping it chilled afterward you don't necessarily need to hot fill, just cool quickly/safely. Fat should be heated significantly since salmonella and things tend to be more heat tolerant with increased fat content. I wouldn't heat any less than 76ºC to give yourself some margins on pathogen reduction for an instantaneous kill. As far as shelf life, depends on what spoils your fat, but that 76ºC should help quite a bit if you're refrigerating the product after. If you already have another upstream kill step or if your manufacturing process already provides some sort of reduction you may be able to go lower. But I can't find any microbial lethality monitoring data for pure fat products in combase.


  • 0

QA Manager and food safety blogger in Oregon, USA.

 

Interested in more information on food safety and science? Check out Furfarmandfork.com for more insights!

Subscribe to have one post per week delivered straight to your inbox.

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users