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Best lighting for fresh produce inspection?


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#1 wil08

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 05:03 PM

Hi, is there anyone who can advise on the most suitable lighting they have used for product inspection areas / tables in terms of improving identification of any defective products and to enable the graders to find these more easily and to remove these from the line.

If anyone has any suggestions that would be very useful - as we are looking to improve our current lighting but not sure what to change over to and which have the most benefits - would be great to hear from those of you within fresh produce especially. 

 

 


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#2 GMO

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:07 PM

it will probably depend on the product and defect.  You want something which will differentiate one from the other.  It may help to give a bit more detail?


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#3 bacon

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Posted 13 February 2018 - 07:54 PM

A while back we had an issue for color verification in a 100 year old cannery. Basically "off" grade colors were getting through the to a latter process step in another part of the plant (upsetting that area and causing and extra steps to resort). We had some (expensive at the time) "true light" LEDs to replace the old florescent ones (no need to change the ballasts I believe). 

1) is stopped poor grading the problem

2) the LEDs last along time (easy ROI)

3) people in the area we MUCH happier to work in "natural" lightning.  

4) proved the point that, when it comes to individual performance, 9 times out of 10, the System drives the Behavior (in this case, the "lighting" was part of the "system"). 

 

I had the same issue in a large jewelry company in a warehouse, so we "standardized" the lighting in all the inspection areas (receiving vs. returns).

-B


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#4 wil08

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 09:49 AM

thanks for the replies folks - yes great to hear your experience with LED lighting - sounds very beneficial.

I am actually looking into LED lights, so just wanted to hear from others who may use it also and if they find it helped / improved their quality and processes.

This change sounds like it definitely worked within the business!

many thanks for your replies and help!

 

regards

Danielle


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#5 Charles.C

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Posted 14 February 2018 - 12:26 PM

Hi, is there anyone who can advise on the most suitable lighting they have used for product inspection areas / tables in terms of improving identification of any defective products and to enable the graders to find these more easily and to remove these from the line.

If anyone has any suggestions that would be very useful - as we are looking to improve our current lighting but not sure what to change over to and which have the most benefits - would be great to hear from those of you within fresh produce especially. 

 

Hi wil,

 

This quote is a little old (1998) but from a well-respected origin -
 

 

Additional points to consider

Lighting should be appropriate such that the intended production or inspection activity can be effectively conducted. The lighting should not alter food colour and should not be less than the following:

Inspection areas are defined as any point where the food product or container is visually inspected or instruments are monitored, e.g. the place where empty containers are evaluated or where products are sorted and inspected.·

 

540 lux (50 foot-candles) in inspection areas
220 lux (20 foot-candles) in work areas
110 lux (10 foot-candles) in other areas

 

http://www.fao.org/d...8e/w8088e04.htm


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Kind Regards,

 

Charles.C





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