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#1 Rolly Angeles

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 08:58 AM

Dear All,


My name is Rolly Angeles, 43 yrs old from the Philippines, married and with 3 childres, currently I am self-employed with my own small firm as a reliability consultant, my firms name is RSA Reliability & Maintenance Consultancy firm. My line of work includes providing technical training and consultation with industries currently in my country on Maintenance Best Practices and Continuous Improvement. My interest in joining this forum is perhaps in the not so distant future someone may have some questions regarding equipment maintnenance and TPM practices. I can provide some sharing regarding this subject matter.


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#2 Simon

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Posted 21 December 2006 - 09:40 AM

My name is Rolly Angeles, 43 yrs old from the Philippines, married and with 3 childres, currently I am self-employed with my own small firm as a reliability consultant, my firms name is RSA Reliability & Maintenance Consultancy firm. My line of work includes providing technical training and consultation with industries currently in my country on Maintenance Best Practices and Continuous Improvement. My interest in joining this forum is perhaps in the not so distant future someone may have some questions regarding equipment maintnenance and TPM practices. I can provide some sharing regarding this subject matter.

Fantastic to hear from you Rolly.

OK so taking you up on your very kind offer, what are Rolly's top TPM tips? :smile:

Regards,
Simon
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#3 Rolly Angeles

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Posted 24 December 2006 - 01:21 AM

Hello Simon and TO all,

Here are some lessons I would like to share with you and the others, this is not only about TPM but on other courses I teach as well

LESSONS ON RELIABILITY

1) Focus must be on RELIABILITY & not reducing cost, because if RELIABILITY starts to improve then COST will definitely go down, there will be times that focusing on reducing COST will tend to hurt RELIABILITY, it cannot be the other way around. Having a low cost maintenance is a consequence of good maintenance practice. Reducing cost had been a focus for most maintenance managers and that perhaps, we need to learn from the lessons of history. Cost must be studied thoroughly not just based from its initial cost but on the entire life cycle cost of the equipment . . .

2) Never ever accept failures in our plant. Trouble shooting is no longer an effective strategy. In today's competitive world, the analysts finds real solutions to the problems. When we get really good at doing things then something is wrong because we are doing it much too often, but when we expect a different result from the same tasks we are doing then this is simple not possible, the Chinese called this INSANITY . . . . .

3) The best time to address a problem is when it is small. It is very hard to advance to any form of specialized maintenance activities and improvement efforts if equipment's Basic Equipment's Condition had not been well established. Always remember our equipment is a shared responsibility for both operators & maintenance people, a lesson we must all learn from the Japanese.

4) In a REACTIVE ENVIRONMENT, we always complain that we lack manpower resources to address failures, but once equipment starts to improve we always wonder where they have been in the first place. In reality maintenance is not outnumbered, they are just too busy working with breakdowns. Maintenance is not measured by how fast we repair but on how we are able to eliminate the failure itself.

5) Every failure has its specific set of consequences, being PROACTIVE has something to do about reducing or eliminating the consequences of failure to a minimum rather than completely eliminating the failure itself. The best maintenance strategy to adopt will always have to be based upon the consequences of the failure itself.

6) A question on why industry remain reactive may lead to a thousand reasons or more & those who fear that improving reliability may lead to elimination of jobs are right only to the point where they resist change. Increasing reliability is not achieved by cutting manpower nor are they contrasting goals. Increasing reliability means slowly getting out of the repair business so that new doors will open to maintenance function. Always remember that the best position an industry have always belong to the maintenance function therefore, lets be proud we belong to maintenance . . . .

7) The real mission of the maintenance department is to provide reliable physical assets & excellent support for its customers by reducing and eliminating the need for maintenance. Do not confuse maintenance as synonymous to repair, these 2 are entirely different.The distinction between a true blooded maintenance & a mechanic is a maintenance uses more of his brain than his hand while a mechanic uses his hand much of the time. Let us treat our people as maintenance & not as mere mechanics

8) There is no silver bullet program or strategy that can transform a plants reliability overnight all will start with its basic foundation and that is through 'EDUCATION' and this is the most most powerful weapon to change the mindset of our people. Reliability is not a program with an end but a culture without an end, its the same as any continuous improvement philosophy . . . .

9) Always remember that in any Reliability Improvement Initiative, the focus must be on the
people provide them with the skills they need & these skills will be used to improve their
equipment. People will improve their machines and it is not the other way around.

Here are the courses I offered here in my country on maintenance & reliability, I hope you dont mind :

1) Adopting Lubrication Strategy - Understanding The Importance of Tribology and Oil Contamination Control

2) Understanding Condition-Based Maintenance - Total Approach To Failure Prediction and Analysis

3) Understanding Total Productive Maintenance - JIPM Approach

4) Understanding TPM's Planned Maintenance 4 Phases To Zero Unplanned Breakdown

5) Root Cause Failure Analysis - Waging War With Failures

6) Reliability-Centred Maintenance For Industries

7) Optimizing Equipment's Reliability - Gearing From Reactive TO Proactive Maintenance

8) Meaningful Measures Of Equipment's Performance - Understanding MTBF, MTBA, MTTR, MTTF, Failure Rate

9) World Class Maintenance Management - The 12 Disciplines Of Maintenance

10) Understanding TPM's Autonomous Maintenance Steps 1 to 3 ( Part 1)

11) Understanding TPM's Focused Improvement Pillar

12) Understanding The Relationship Between Equipment Losses and Overall Equipment Effectiveness

13) Understanding Proactive Maintenance - Achieving A Culture Of Relaibility

14) Basic Maintenance Concept - Understanding Reactive, Preventive, Predictive and Proactive Miantenance

Thank you simon for your interest,

Rolly Angeles


Wishing you and your family the best this holiday season . . Merry X-mass and A Happy and Prosperous New Year for all of us . . . God Speed Us All,


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#4 KellyB

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Posted 29 December 2006 - 12:15 PM

Hello Rolly and welcome (from someone who is also new to the forums).
I find your employment very interesting and your lessons maybe very helpful to some people.
Thank God, I don't have much to do with maintenance where I work, the firm that employs me only imports foodstuff from all over Asia (including the Philippines), it's been 4 years now and I am just beginning to understand your food (and all those strange names of ingredients, LOL). I handle quality matters.
Are you situated in Manila? I visited your country last March with my boss and we carried out some audits with our providers there.
Perhaps you could post your lessons as a topic, I suppose packagers would find it interesting.
Regards and many wishes for a healthy and prosperous New Year :band:
Kelly B.


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