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Pasteurisation Process for Liquid Egg


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#1 Simon

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 10:02 AM

Can anybody tell me the process for pasteurising liquid egg (yolk and white)? And also, how long liquid egg will last for when pasteurised.

I think the pasteurisation process uses heat, so how do you keep the egg from cooking?

Thanks in advance,
Simon


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#2 pinar

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 11:34 AM

Hello Simon,

You're right, pasteurisation is a heat process. Pasteurisation temperature is enough to kill pathogen microorganisms, but not enough to cook liquid egg. Pasteurisation temperatures are 56 C for liquid egg white and 61 C for liquid egg yolk. Holding time is also important.
Shelf life of pasteurized liquid egg depends on packaging type. It lasts 3-4 weeks at 0 - (+4) C when aseptic filling is applied.
It's very important to keep raw and pasteurised egg at good conditions ( below +4 C).

I hope I could answer your question.

Best regards, Pinar


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#3 Simon

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 12:20 PM

Thanks for that Pinar, I appreciate your help. When you say holding time is critical, can you be more specific please?

Thanks,
Simon


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#4 pinar

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 01:18 PM

Simon,

With these mentioned pasteurisation temperatures, about 3,5 minutes holding times are applied for egg yolk and white. If past. temp. increases, holding time decreases. If you pasteurise egg at low temperature you have to decrease holding time. Otherwise protein denaturation occurs and you may have diffuculties to take cooked egg from the heat exchanger tubes.

Rgrds, pinar


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#5 Simon

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Posted 16 November 2007 - 08:16 PM

Simon,

With these mentioned pasteurisation temperatures, about 3,5 minutes holding times are applied for egg yolk and white. If past. temp. increases, holding time decreases. If you pasteurise egg at low temperature you have to decrease holding time. Otherwise protein denaturation occurs and you may have diffuculties to take cooked egg from the heat exchanger tubes.

Rgrds, pinar

Thank you so much Pinar. I'm guessing denaturation means the runny egg starts to turn into scrambled egg. Remember I'm a really dumm on these things. Have you got any other do's and don'ts Pinar?

I may have some very specific questions later, but I will need to PM you. :biggrin:

Regards,
Simon
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#6 cazyncymru

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Posted 11 December 2007 - 05:49 PM

Simon

Pasteuriation is legally a "time / temperature" combination

In milk production it is 71.7 degrees for 15 seconds, but most dairies will use 72 degrees for 25 seconds.
we have a dairy who does a cultured product and their pasteurisation time temperature combination is completly different ( a holding time of around 5 minutes, but at a much lower temp).

As Pinar says , in eggs they have to be careful as not to cook the egg......bet its worse than milk to get off a pasteuriser plate (or tube)

if you'd like to know more Simon, i can send you some wonderful literature (Yawn!)


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#7 Simon

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Posted 12 December 2007 - 08:31 AM

Simon

Pasteuriation is legally a "time / temperature" combination

In milk production it is 71.7 degrees for 15 seconds, but most dairies will use 72 degrees for 25 seconds.
we have a dairy who does a cultured product and their pasteurisation time temperature combination is completly different ( a holding time of around 5 minutes, but at a much lower temp).

As Pinar says , in eggs they have to be careful as not to cook the egg......bet its worse than milk to get off a pasteuriser plate (or tube)

if you'd like to know more Simon, i can send you some wonderful literature (Yawn!)

Thanks for that Caz. I wanted to know because I had a brainwave for a new range of food products. :rolleyes: Knowing what's involved I've gone a bit cold on the idea. I tend to have ideas quite a lot; it's converting them that's the problem. Maybe I should go and see them at Dragon's Den. Would you believe I once had an idea for a Lottery game? I wrote it all down and sent it to Camelot. They reviewed it and sent me a letter back thanking me and explaining the technical reasons why it wouldn’t work. I also wrote to Simon Cowell's company on an idea for a new talent(less) competition. He didn't reply. :thumbdown: There are countless others. Did you know I once started a food safety and quality website. (double rolleyes)

Anyway it's nice to see you back Caz. Please send me the literature, you never know.

Cheers,
Simon
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#8 Charles.C

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 03:58 AM

Dear Cazx,

Anyway it's nice to see you back Caz.


Indeed so but preferably not yawning. Been counting cows again ? All work and no play :smile: :whistle: (or is it the other way round ?)

@ Simon -

I tend to have ideas quite a lot; it's converting them that's the problem

Just like English Football without the ideas :smile:

Rgds / Charles.C
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#9 Simon

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Posted 13 December 2007 - 08:02 PM

@ Simon -
Just like English Football without the ideas :smile:

Nice one Charles. Maybe it will be different if Capello beomes Manager as expected. He has a good pedigree and will be very tough on the prima donnas. Bye, bye to the WAGS. :bye:

Regards,
Simon
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#10 cazyncymru

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Posted 14 December 2007 - 04:06 PM

Dear Cazx,



Indeed so but preferably not yawning. Been counting cows again ? All work and no play :smile: :whistle: (or is it the other way round ?)

Rgds / Charles.C



It's nice to be back......I've had a busy 6 months working on a project. Hopefully things should calm a bit now!
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